CDN$ 11.63
  • List Price: CDN$ 15.93
  • You Save: CDN$ 4.30 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Vineslearn New Testament Greek Paperback – Jun 4 1997


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 11.63
CDN$ 5.54 CDN$ 4.30

2014 Books Gift Guide
Thug Kitchen is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson (June 4 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785212329
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785212324
  • Product Dimensions: 23.2 x 15.8 x 0.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #626,112 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

About the Author

W.E. Vine, M.A., was a classical scholar, skilled expositor, and a trustworthy theologian. Recognized internationally for his outstanding Greek scholarship, his Expository Dictionary of New Testament Words, first published in 1939, represents the fruit of his lifetime labors and is an unsurpassed classic in its field.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The student should familiarize himself with the alphabet, capital and small letters, and their names, and should observe carefully the notes given below. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
.

Vine's book is adequate, but not one of the best on the market for introducing Koine, or Biblical Greek. Here are the reasons:

(1) Small type format

(2) Grammar focus

(3) Neglects writing the Greek Alphabet

(4) Minimal illustration

The highly compacted textual format, serves as a discouragement to pick up.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
This book is a big aid to those who are not students of Greek and need an elementary level companion to the Greek New Testament. Very inexpensive--lots of info for the cost--a great value!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Sometimes you get what you pay for Nov. 17 2012
By Adriano Hundhausen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I managed to teach myself Koine a decade ago using Hewett's New Testament Greek: A Beginning and Intermediate Grammar. It was, not surprisingly, a hard slog, but by the end I could make my own way through the gospels or Revelations fairly confidently. Then, after neglecting my Greek for years, I decided to brush up on it with a different textbook, since I had written all the solutions to Hewett's exercises directly into that textbook.

Vine was easy to get and cheap, so I figured why not. Unfortunately, I am sceptical that even the most motivated autodidact could learn Koine with only Vine's text. Perhaps if you already knew Latin or another heavily inflected language, and also had a bit of a masochistic streak in you. Vine's method gives you a huge dose of nouns and adjectives and pronouns and declension right at the start - the first 5 chapters give no verbs other than 'to be', in fact. For native speakers of English this is terribly tough to get through, since English is such a verb-centered language. Then, when verbs are finally introduced in lesson 6, Vine gives you all 6 tenses of the indicative mood at once. WOW. I am a professional linguist and that scares the begeepers right out of me. The whole learning process seemed pretty smooth when I was using Hewett's method, which is much more verb-centered, but I shudder to think what it would have been like if my first taste of Greek had come through Vine.

Vine chose to exclusively use verses from the New Testament to form the exercises for his method. This is a noble thought, but it means that towards the beginning of the book, he must help you with direct translations of multiple words from some sentences. These translated words, which you don't know yet at that point, would have distracted me from learning the core material of the given chapter. This method also means that Vine can dispense with writing a key to the exercises, since he can just point you to the NT verse in question, but your Greek will then be colored by whatever English translation you are using to check your work. I am not sure that this doesn't defeat the whole point of learning Koine in the first place, which is presumably to free you from other people's translations and the inevitable interpretations that they carry with them. I preferred Hewett's approach, where he invented the sentences in the exercises at the beginning of his textbook and provided a key to go with them, and then started to introduce some complete NT verses towards the middle of the book.

There are also several annoying details about the edition of Vine that I have (1997, Thomas Nelson Inc.). The breathing marks above letters are so small that I sometimes feel I need a magnifying glass to determine if the mark is hard or soft, and if you try to use this book anywhere but at home at your desk, you may not be able to make them out. I suppose that is really the fault of the font selected, but in that case a larger font could have been chosen. In addition, some of the intratextual references are wrong, e.g. a reference to what is on p. 48 leads you to something different from what was intended; the correct reference should have been to p. 28. Those errors must have crept in when this work went through a new edition at some point.

I did fine with Hewett, and I have heard good things about Mounce as well, but I recommend you not try to save money by using Vine.
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Needs improving Feb. 14 2009
By Bruce Bain - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Vine's book is adequate, but not one of the best on the market for introducing Koine, or Biblical Greek. Here are the reasons:

(1) Small type format

(2) Grammar focus

(3) Neglects writing the Greek Alphabet

(4) Minimal illustration

The highly compacted textual format, serves as a discouragement to pick up.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Not a "Do-it-yourself" book July 11 2011
By Dan W. Crawford - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was and is used as a seminary textbook nationwide. As such, it is excellent. However, without the oversight and help of a professor, this book is of very little use. It is written in an archaic style and needs much more explanation if it is to be useful for the at home layperson.
22 of 30 people found the following review helpful
A Quick Read and a Great Help April 20 2001
By Rachel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is a big aid to those who are not students of Greek and need an elementary level companion to the Greek New Testament. Very inexpensive--lots of info for the cost--a great value!
Review of vine's learn Greek Jan. 30 2014
By La22bay - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I already had this book needed a new one. The is a very good tool to teach beginners in Greek language.


Feedback