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Viva la Vida [NTSC, Import]

Coldplay Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 23.88 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Viva la Vida + A Rush Of Blood To The Head (Vinyl) + Parachutes (Vinyl)
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Product Description

Product Description

Limited Asian two disc (CD + NTSC/Region 0 DVD) Tour Edition includes a bonus DVD that contains six music videos to the singles off the album: 'Strawberry Swing', 'Violet Hill', 'Viva La Vida', 'Lost!', 'Lovers In Japan' and 'Life In Technicolor II'. The 2008 album comprises 10 brand new tracks, recorded in London, Barcelona and New York with producers Brian Eno and Markus Dravs. Viva La Vida followed the hugely successful album X&Y, which has sold 10 million copies since its release in 2005. EMI.

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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Favorite Coldplay April 14 2014
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I am biased when it comes to their music- it is great artistry and I think songs from this CD in particular will become timeless classics... thought provoking lyrics, contemporary style music and in the pocket vocals. Coldplay employs sophisticated musical arrangements that have cross-generation appeal.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Viva la Vida Aug. 9 2014
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Nice summertime CD.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected but I love Coldplay so meh Jan. 15 2010
Format:Audio CD
I though this would be a CD with an entire Live performance from one of their Viva La Vida Tour concerts, but all it was, was a copy of Viva La Vida/Death ANd All Our Friends (the STudio or regular CD) and a DVD with all their music videos on it (for the songs that were only featured on the album so, viva la vida, technicolor II, strawberry Swing, lost, etc.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars  566 reviews
236 of 257 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Viviendo La Vida! June 17 2008
By Rudy Palma - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Coldplay has turned in another solid effort with its 4th studio album, the indecisively-titled "Viva La Vida or Death and All His Friends," but they expand their boundaries this time. Gone is the predictability of tightly-wound, highly catchy 4 minute arena pop/rock anthems marching in succession, not to mention the sensitive male singer/songwriter clichés and often dial-by-numbers production values. The British quartet has traded that solid but stagnant formula for artsy experimentation, and the results are commendable, even if their enlisting legendary studio wizard Brian Eno to bolster the LP's ethereal, left-field sound is in and of itself predictable. These songs do not lend themselves to radio playlists in the vein of "Clocks" or "Talk," but the album is their most intriguing and memorable. The results are a little less Phil Collins, a little more Peter Gabriel.

The highly digitized, nearly instrumental "Life In Technicolor" opens the album on a high note with sweeping Middle-Eastern instrumentation and loopy, buoyant beats. Immediately ascertainable is that this is not an album that can safely grace the intercom of the local ShopRite. With hand claps and frothy production values behind a droning, funereal organ, "Lost!" is a poignant, yearning ode to finding salvation and a new lease on life. Accented by just the right amount of electric guitar, the intriguing, atypical track not only rocks and invigorates but finds these talented musicians trying for something new and succeeding, underscoring the album's unexpectedly adventurous direction.

With its soul-searching sentiments and sizzling melody, chugging lead single "Viva La Vida" is the only track that oozes mainstream appeal with its sweeping, gorgeously evocative melody that has landed it at #1 on the Billboard pop charts. In that light, it is classic Coldplay and, amazingly, their first Top 5 hit. Even alternate lead single "Violet Hill," a Top 40 hit, defies radio programmers with its mercurial tempo and deep, adventurous lyrics. Singer Chris Martin, however, has never sounded more confident in his delivery, and the band's playing skills have never been demonstrated so impressively in-studio. These four guys sound truly in-sync, and rather than burying their sound Eno smartly accentuates it, bringing out the essence of the songs.

The plaintive "42" is another awesome outing. After 90 seconds of mellow piano and dark lyrics the song zooms into a succession of production swirls, fast melody swings and snazzy electric guitars. It is not only a marvel, but worth many listens. "Lovers In Japan" is also a winner with its sunny, bristly melody - the way Martin wraps his vocals around the proceedings is a pleasure to hear. The thunderous ode to peace that is "Death and All His Friends" is also a highlight as it closes the album before revealing a hidden track titled "The Escapist," a mellow finale set to the tune of "Life In Technicolor."

The men of Coldplay will likely lose fans who prize clear-cut ear candy over adventurousness, yet will surely gain respect from those who had previously written them off as creators of slick but predictable radio-savvy pop/rock. What's for sure, however, is that this is their most interesting outing to date.

The painting on the album covers is "Liberty Leading the People (La Liberté guidant le peuple)" by French artist Eugène Delacroix depicting the July Revolution of 1830.
85 of 96 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Assuming We Knew Nothing of Coldplay... June 17 2008
By Liam F. - Published on Amazon.com
And assuming that we had no knowledge of any of Coldplay's previous 3 albums, and assuming that we had no idea of Coldplay's alleged greatness in today's music world. So without any comparison or benchmark, here's what I have to say.

"Life in Technicolor" is so aptly titled. An instrumental arrangement that gradually picks up in volume, texture and excitement, this album opener is so colourful it reminds you of a carnival. It gets your foot tapping and your head nodding. Some sources rumour that this song will be sung in words in Coldplay's next CD. The mood then glooms down when "Cemeteries of London" comes along. Sinister synthesizers flood the atmosphere and mysterious notes tinkle from the piano before the beats enter and the song erupts into a minor-key rock anthem. You'll find yourself singing "la la la la la" in no time. "Lost" bounds in, as track #3, with claps and a bouncy beat. Featuring some of the most intriguing lyrics (either deep or nonsensical will depend on you) - "just because I'm hurting, doesn't mean I'm hurt" and "just because I'm losing, doesn't mean I'm lost" - this song maintains the upbeat tempo throughout.

The mood becomes sombre once again at the beginning of "42". Apparently this is the favourite number of this band's lead singer. Anyway, by the time you finish pondering what makes 42, the number, so likeable, this song takes a sharp turn and rages forward, pounding drums screeching guitars and all. "42" finishes off back where it began - kinda like a fine day turning into a storm and becoming peaceful once again after the storm. Work of art. "Lovers in Japan/Reign of Love" is really 2 songs. "Lovers in Japan" sports a `happy' tune, with racing piano. If drums were replaced by a techno beat, it could easily pass off as the next hottest dance-pop tune in the vein of Dario G's "Sunchyme". "Reign of Love" is soothing, tranquil and relaxing. The vocals are gentle, cradled by softly played piano, all enveloped by warm synthesizers. Reminiscent of a walk in the garden in the evening.

"Yes/Chinese Sleep Chant" is once again 2 songs. "Yes" seems like it is sung by a different singer. Turns out it's not. Same singer, lower register. Interesting presentation. Dangerous sounding, minor-key tune. At the 1:33 mark, Arabic-flavoured strings add zest to the instrumental arrangement of the song. "Chinese Sleep Chant" could easily sit in the track listing of the soundtrack to "Lost in Translation". Guitar distortion and feedback, pounding drums, and a faded yet ethereal voice makes listening to this track a giddying sensation. You could be hypnotised.

"Viva La Vida". Remarkably intelligent songwriting. Encapsulates originality, creativity, artsiness and yet retains every element needed for commercialism. Chorus is catchy as ever. The bell and strings stick in your head - for a long, long time. "Roman cavalry choirs", "Jerusalem" and "St Peter" will pop up in your head a lot. Come minute mark 3:00, when the band erupts into "Oh oh oh oh oh", the song lift itself into the stratosphere, sweeping you along with it. "Violet Hill" comes next. A dark, brooding rock song, A piano-laced song, sprinkled with distorted electric guitar and a mean guitar solo - I'm inclined to call this rock song of the year. A little U2, a little Phil Collins, a little White Stripes - brilliant.

"Strawberry Swing" starts like a folk tune. The beats enter like tribal drums. Can you see yourself dancing around the fire? Catchy melody, immaculate instrumentation. "Death and All His Friends" is a piano-based song that starts with a gentle lullaby-ish chanting and builds up into a soaring and memorable crescendo, as the album bids you good-bye with a reprise of "Life in Technicolor", entitled "The Escapist". "Death and All His Friends" reminds you what a thrilling ride your musical senses have just been on. By the time this CD leaves you, you'd be eager to push play again.

"Viva La Vida or Death and All His Friends" is a most enjoyable listening experience that keeps getting better each time. Don't judge it in comparison to the 3 previous Coldplay CDs. This one is completely different but just as, if not more, haunting.

Liam
18 June 2008
73 of 87 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Coldplay enters into yet newer territory, with great results June 17 2008
By Paul Allaer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
As a fan from Coldplay's very early days (I still have "Parachutes" as one of my favorite albums of the last decade, and I saw the band's second ever US gig, in February 2001 in Portland, OR), I have to admit that I was somewhat apprehensive about the new album, which has been widely touted as Coldplay's 'experimental' album. One of the things touted was that the album would feature sounds recorded in a Barcelona church, as if anyone really cares about that, in the end we just want to hear good songs/a good album. So.... three years after "X&Y", finally comes Coldplay's 4th studio album.

"Viva la Vida or Death and All of His Friends" (10 tracks, 46 min.) starts off with a 1-2 blast of the soaring instrumental "Life in Technicolor" and the equally great "Cemeteries of London". "Lost!" finds Chris Martin pensive ("I May Be Losing/But I'm Not Lost"). The album centers around the two long tracks into the middle: "Lovers in Japan/Reign of Love" (2 separate songs stapled together for whatever reason, with "Lovers in Japan" reminding me of U2's "Where the Streets Have No Name", courtesy of producer Brian Eno) and "Yes", which also features 2 different songs, albeit under the same name. "Viva La Vida" (2nd single, also featured in the iPod commercial, prompting Coldplay to its biggest Billboard Hot 100 success ever at No. 3) is a nice dreamy song. "Violet Hill" (1st single) is for me the best song on the album, even without it being catchy as such. The album's closer "Death and All of His Friends" crashes in after a pensive beginning and also includes the 'hidden' track "Chinese Sleep Chant", which reprises the"Life in Technicolor" theme, and a nice way to round off the album.

In all, this album makes clear that this is not the Coldplay of yesteryear. Even "X&Y" sounds dated by this. There isn't a single "catchy" song as such on here. "Speed of Sound" from "X&Y", the last link to the earlier Coldplay instantly recognizable sound, sounds far, far away now. No falsetto singing from Chris Martin is to be found here. This is the new Coldplay. "Viva La Vida or Death and All of His Friends" is intended what U2's fourth studio album, 1984's "The Unforgettable Fire", was intended to be: a nice break with the previous band's output, paving the way for more ambitious future outings, and on that level, Coldplay definitely have arrived. Whether Coldplay has an album like U2's next album, 1987's "The Joshua Tree", in them remains to be seen. But this album sure feels like Coldplay is up to it. I am in for the ride.
28 of 34 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not terrible, but not brilliant either June 17 2008
By Freelancer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
3.5 Stars. I just want to to say to those who are giving this album one star is that you aren't listening to it enough. When I first heard the album I hated it. But I also can't agree with the rosy 5 star reviews that call this their best album yet. And that won't change over time either. Coldplay made this album in part because of some macho complex that kept telling them they are a girly band, Martin has a girly voice, and their music isn't all that serious. In other words, they made this album for critics. And the critics, to no surprise, love it.

I have liked every album Coldplay has put out and I will say that I don't think they have really made an atrocious song yet. That streak has come to an end. As I mentioned, I listened to this album straight through the first time and I did not care for it all. But being a fan and listening to other positive fan reviews I decided to keep listening. After this exercise, I have to say there are a few good songs on here, but this is not the complete album that Coldplay's previous efforts have produced. On those other albums I may occasionally skip one song. On this album, I find myself only listening frequently to a few. Here are my thoughts:

I want to say that I really like the first part of the album. Cemeteries of London is a good song. It has a great pace and catchy chorus in the refrain. I also absolutely love 42. It's probably the most familiar song Coldplay fans will find on this record. As for Lost! and Lovers in Japan, I like them, but I love! love! love! their acoustic versions better. It is kind of ironic that these acoustic versions sound much more like Coldplay than the regular tracks. With Lost!, perhaps it is that the piano, which I absolutely adore, lets this track shine and the lyrics and Martin's voice shine through. I don't think I have ever patently preferred an acoustic version of a song over the original until now. As for Lovers In Japan, I like both versions, but again, the acoustic brings out the lyrics better than the original.

The next part of the album is what I would call more experimental. Reign of Love is okay, but it lacks something that I can't quite pinpoint yet. Yes is very much experimental... sort of like A Whisper. What I don't like is Martin trying to change his voice. It sounds brooding and dark. I hate Chinese Sleep Chant.

Viva la Vida is one of the two singles getting air time. It is a great song. I think if it was placed earlier in the album it would probably play better. My head is still ringing from Chinese sleep chant. I think it could also use some piano. More Piano! More Cowbell!

Violet Hill, the main single, is okay. But again it feels out of place on the album. It also sounds like an 80's song I can't quite place. I think another reviewer referenced this. I like the song... but it just doesn't really sound like a Coldplay song.

Strawberry Swing... the concept and jingle is interesting, but is very poorly executed. Martin sounds like he is mumbling like a later Eddie Vedder. I also think it could use a more robust guitar. Something more akin to the guitar work in Green Eyes. It's a song worth listening to once to sample the band's experimentation, but I can easily see my self forgetting this song over time.

Death and all his friends... okay ending song. But again, you are kind of already asleep from Strawberry Swing to really get the effect of the intro. I would take it or leave it.

I get the sense that this album will most likely sound better live without all the extra layers of production Brian Eno felt the need to saddle this album with. The guy who produced Arcade Fire also worked on this album and it shows. I don't much care for Arcade Fire because while their music is interesting, it's also so layered and textured that it almost becomes an exercise in itself to listen to it. Many songs on this album require that similar exercise. I am glad Coldplay decided to break the mold a bit, even though I really liked X&Y. But I think they could have been experimental without abandoning their sound on much of the album. It seems almost like an imposter band is playing the music on some of this album because they were trying to make their sound more macho. I think they failed in this respect and also failed in staying true to their sound. The song Yes is the epitome of this effort. Coldplay needs to stop listening to producers and critics that are telling them to go this direction. It ignores the millions of fans that fell in love with their first three albums.

On a final note, I can't recommend to you enough to get the acoustic versions of Lost! and Lovers in Japan.
19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Assuming We Knew Nothing of Coldplay... June 17 2008
By Liam F. - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
And assuming that we had no knowledge of any of Coldplay's previous 3 albums, and assuming that we had no idea of Coldplay's alleged greatness in today's music world. So without any comparison or benchmark, here's what I have to say.

"Life in Technicolor" is so aptly titled. An instrumental arrangement that gradually picks up in volume, texture and excitement, this album opener is so colourful it reminds you of a carnival. It gets your foot tapping and your head nodding. Some sources rumour that this song will be sung in words in Coldplay's next CD. The mood then glooms down when "Cemeteries of London" comes along. Sinister synthesizers flood the atmosphere and mysterious notes tinkle from the piano before the beats enter and the song erupts into a minor-key rock anthem. You'll find yourself singing "la la la la la" in no time. "Lost" bounds in, as track #3, with claps and a bouncy beat. Featuring some of the most intriguing lyrics (either deep or nonsensical will depend on you) - "just because I'm hurting, doesn't mean I'm hurt" and "just because I'm losing, doesn't mean I'm lost" - this song maintains the upbeat tempo throughout.

The mood becomes sombre once again at the beginning of "42". Apparently this is the favourite number of this band's lead singer. Anyway, by the time you finish pondering what makes 42, the number, so likeable, this song takes a sharp turn and rages forward, pounding drums screeching guitars and all. "42" finishes off back where it began - kinda like a fine day turning into a storm and becoming peaceful once again after the storm. Work of art. "Lovers in Japan/Reign of Love" is really 2 songs. "Lovers in Japan" sports a `happy' tune, with racing piano. If drums were replaced by a techno beat, it could easily pass off as the next hottest dance-pop tune in the vein of Dario G's "Sunchyme". "Reign of Love" is soothing, tranquil and relaxing. The vocals are gentle, cradled by softly played piano, all enveloped by warm synthesizers. Reminiscent of a walk in the garden in the evening.

"Yes/Chinese Sleep Chant" is once again 2 songs. "Yes" seems like it is sung by a different singer. Turns out it's not. Same singer, lower register. Interesting presentation. Dangerous sounding, minor-key tune. At the 1:33 mark, Arabic-flavoured strings add zest to the instrumental arrangement of the song. "Chinese Sleep Chant" could easily sit in the track listing of the soundtrack to "Lost in Translation". Guitar distortion and feedback, pounding drums, and a faded yet ethereal voice makes listening to this track a giddying sensation. You could be hypnotised.

"Viva La Vida". Remarkably intelligent songwriting. Encapsulates originality, creativity, artsiness and yet retains every element needed for commercialism. Chorus is catchy as ever. The bell and strings stick in your head - for a long, long time. "Roman cavalry choirs", "Jerusalem" and "St Peter" will pop up in your head a lot. Come minute mark 3:00, when the band erupts into "Oh oh oh oh oh", the song lift itself into the stratosphere, sweeping you along with it. "Violet Hill" comes next. A dark, brooding rock song, A piano-laced song, sprinkled with distorted electric guitar and a mean guitar solo - I'm inclined to call this rock song of the year. A little U2, a little Phil Collins, a little White Stripes - brilliant.

"Strawberry Swing" starts like a folk tune. The beats enter like tribal drums. Can you see yourself dancing around the fire? Catchy melody, immaculate instrumentation. "Death and All His Friends" is a piano-based song that starts with a gentle lullaby-ish chanting and builds up into a soaring and memorable crescendo, as the album bids you good-bye with a reprise of "Life in Technicolor", entitled "The Escapist". "Death and All His Friends" reminds you what a thrilling ride your musical senses have just been on. By the time this CD leaves you, you'd be eager to push play again.

"Viva La Vida or Death and All His Friends" is a most enjoyable listening experience that keeps getting better each time. Don't judge it in comparison to the 3 previous Coldplay CDs. This one is completely different but just as, if not more, haunting.

Liam
18 June 2008
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