Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Vlasov and the Russian Liberation Movement: Soviet Reality and Emigré Theories [Paperback]

Catherine Andreyev
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
List Price: CDN$ 35.95
Price: CDN$ 25.40 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: CDN$ 10.55 (29%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Friday, October 3? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover CDN $80.76  
Paperback CDN $25.40  
Save Up to 90% on Textbooks
Hit the books in Amazon.ca's Textbook Store and save up to 90% on used textbooks and 35% on new textbooks. Learn more.
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

March 30 1990 0521389607 978-0521389600 Reprint
This book deals with the attempt by Soviet citizens to create an anti-Soviet Liberation Movement during the Second World War. The Movement's ultimate importance lies in its expression of grass-roots opposition to the Soviet regime, the first substantial such efflorescence since 1922. The motivation of its titular leader, Vlasov, is examined in detail, as is its fundamental ideology, analyzed within the context not merely of wartime but of prewar Soviet and Russian emigré society.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Join Amazon Student in Canada


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

Review

"Her main aim is to synthesize and comment on the political ideas of the Russians and others associated with what she properly calls not simply the 'Vlasov movement' but the Russian Liberation Movement....Her book includes a comprehensive and judicious survey of what others have done, full citations to sources, and an extensive bibliography. The writing is clear, graceful, and precise." American Historical Review

"...an elegant, authoritative but highly readable book." The Journal of Soviet Military Studies

"Andreyev's book is likely to become the standard reference work on an important movement whose leading figures were hanged in Moscow in August 1946" Journal of Ukrainian Studies

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Almost at once after the outbreak of war between the USSR and the Third Reich on 22 June 1941, Soviet citizens in German hands, particularly prisoners-of-war and those civilians employed as forced labour by the Nazis, made clear their active opposition to Stalin and his regime. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars A look at the controversial General Vlasov May 26 1998
Format:Paperback
Every so often a text appears which dispells the conventional wisdom of what we come to accept as history. Catherine Andreyev's "Vlasov and the Russian Liberation Movement" is such a work. This narrative tells the story of one of the strangest, yet most compelling episolds in the history of the second world war. In July of 1942, a Soviet Army general, Andrei Vlasov was captured by the invading German Army. He later came to lead a non-existant force known as the ROA, or Russian Liberation Army. Although this force had never exsted, he was in fact the ideological leader of an estimated 800 million Russians who were opposed to Stalin and served in various capacities during the war. Throughout the war it was clear that the movement was not, as their opponents had charged, blind collaboration with the Nazi forces but a political movement in its own right. The goal of Vlasov and his group was none other than a free and democratic Russian state. In the course of the movement, it was in fact the Nazis themselves that provided the strongest opposition to the goals of the ROA. They, in fact had desired to use Vlasov only for the purpose of propaganda against the Soviets. Andreyev's story tells the story of the various individuals in the movement and the tragic outcome of this movement. Particular emphisis is placed on different factions involved. In this story we learn about the soldiers themselves who were mostly russian prisoners of war, as well as the civilian emigre groups who supported the ROA. We also see the internal struggle between the Vlasov's group who sincerely wanted to liberate their homeland and the Nazi hierarchy who concidered the russians as being racially inferior and wanted to use them as puppets. In short this is an excellent story of an idealistic, but doomed group of people and their struggle.
Tom Pierce
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A look at the controversial General Vlasov May 26 1998
By BERWYN1014@aol.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Every so often a text appears which dispells the conventional wisdom of what we come to accept as history. Catherine Andreyev's "Vlasov and the Russian Liberation Movement" is such a work. This narrative tells the story of one of the strangest, yet most compelling episolds in the history of the second world war. In July of 1942, a Soviet Army general, Andrei Vlasov was captured by the invading German Army. He later came to lead a non-existant force known as the ROA, or Russian Liberation Army. Although this force had never exsted, he was in fact the ideological leader of an estimated 800 million Russians who were opposed to Stalin and served in various capacities during the war. Throughout the war it was clear that the movement was not, as their opponents had charged, blind collaboration with the Nazi forces but a political movement in its own right. The goal of Vlasov and his group was none other than a free and democratic Russian state. In the course of the movement, it was in fact the Nazis themselves that provided the strongest opposition to the goals of the ROA. They, in fact had desired to use Vlasov only for the purpose of propaganda against the Soviets. Andreyev's story tells the story of the various individuals in the movement and the tragic outcome of this movement. Particular emphisis is placed on different factions involved. In this story we learn about the soldiers themselves who were mostly russian prisoners of war, as well as the civilian emigre groups who supported the ROA. We also see the internal struggle between the Vlasov's group who sincerely wanted to liberate their homeland and the Nazi hierarchy who concidered the russians as being racially inferior and wanted to use them as puppets. In short this is an excellent story of an idealistic, but doomed group of people and their struggle.
Tom Pierce
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vlasov and the Russian Liberation Movement March 30 2000
By James Koo - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This work is primarily on the ideology of the wartime German sponsored Russian Liberation Movement. Its leadership, who had advanced under Stalin and had been captured by the Germans, attempted to combine Communist, Russian nationalist, and Western democratic beliefs, in a platform that would appeal to the majority of Russians, as well as to the United States. The main statements of the Movement, which the author examines, were devoid of Nazi ideology, and the Movement itself never received the full approval of Hitler and his highest subordinates. Because the leaders of the Russian Liberation Movement were able to express their views on the Stalinist system, without the constraints of the system, this analysis of their ideology, would be of great interest to students of Soviet internal politics before and during the Second World War.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback