Voodoo River (An Elvis Cole Novel) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 8.54
  • List Price: CDN$ 8.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 0.45 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Voodoo River has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Voodoo River Mass Market Paperback – Apr 1 1996


See all 29 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 8.54
CDN$ 1.67 CDN$ 0.01

Best Canadian Books of 2014
Stone Mattress is our #1 Canadian pick for 2014. See all

Frequently Bought Together

Voodoo River + Sunset Express: An Elvis Cole Novel + Lullaby Town
Price For All Three: CDN$ 29.28


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion (April 1 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786889055
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786889051
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 3.2 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 204 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #34,202 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Fifth installment in Crais's Elvis Cole series, in which the wisecracking private eye journeys from Los Angeles to Louisiana to trace a client's past.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

On a trip to Louisiana in order to locate the biological parents of a popular television actress, private eye Elvis Cole runs into more than he bargained for, including a cast of memorable characters. From the author of Lullaby Town (Bantam, 1992).
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mac Blair on Nov. 17 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the fifth book for me in this series. I think I liked it least of all. I am so glad I did not read the Booklist Review before I bought the book or I would not have bought it. Why they had to give the main information I do not know. Elvis is in Cajun country, Crais is at home. But, I was not pleased with a lot of pages of talk, talk and more talk with Lucy. Elvis does his job, see review, but thought a lot of the book just drug. The ending was good but only lasted a few pages. Would also like a lot more of Pike. He is so good. Can do without Lucy in future books but I gather she is going to be in them. If you have not read a Crais book before do not start with this one. Any of the first four are better, I think.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Feb. 18 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Having just read Hostage, Demolition Angel, and LA Requiem, I am now reading Voodoo River. I guess you could say that I like Robert Crais" writing.
The back page always refers to Mr. Crais' credentials as a screenwriter for LA Law and Hill Street Blues, both excellent TV shows from years gone by. Why hasn't any of his books been considered for full-length movies? It seems to be a natural consequence, given his prior work.
I can't help but visualize each of the characters, especially, Joe Pike. I think of Jan Michael Vincent as Joe Pike, cat-like, etc.
Given the success this year of the movie version of Mystic River, I think it might be time to consider one of Crais' novels for a similar treatment. The difficulty lies in deciding which one to do first. LA Requiem was good for the action and character of Joe Pike. Might be a good one to begin with. I'll have to read the rest of the books so I can assess them all.
Later.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul Skinner on June 27 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Elvis gets a call to help out a TV actress discover info about her biological parents, which leads him to a small town in Louisiana. Interesting characters abound, including a giant snapping turtle. Soon, Elvis realizes another detective is on the scene, and not everything is as it first appears. The storyline also involves some romance with Elvis first meeting Lucy Chenier (who appears in subsequent Elvis stories), a lawyer from Baton Rouge. Somewhere about 2/3rd of the way into this book, the storyline changes as Elvis takes on a mission to right the wrongs of several folks in the back woods.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on May 17 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you have yet to begin the marvelous Elvis Cole series by Robert Crais, you've got a great treat ahead of you! Few series get off to a stronger start than Mr. Crais did with The Monkey's Raincoat, which won both the Anthony and Macavity awards for best novel while being nominated for the Edgar and Shamus awards as well. Stalking the Angel followed powerfully with classic noir style of the 1930s hard-boiled detective up against evil moderated with wise cracks. Lullaby Town updated the 1930s detective stories about Hollywood. Free Fall looked hard at the corruptibility of the police and found them wanting. And the books just keep getting better from there in their characterizations, action, story-telling and excitement.
Elvis Cole is the star attraction, the co-owner of The Elvis Cole Detective Agency. He's now 40ish, ex-Army, served in Vietnam, ex-security guard, has two years of college, learned to be a detective by working under George Feider, a licensed P.I. for over 40 years, does martial arts as enthusiastically as most people do lunch, and is fearless but not foolish. He's out to right the wrongs of the world as much as he is to earn a living. Elvis has a thing for Disney characters (including a Pinocchio clock), kids, cats, scared clients and rapid fire repartee. He drives a Jamaica yellow 1966 Corvette Stingray convertible, and usually carries a Dan Wesson .38 Special.
His main foil is partner, Joe Pike, an ex-Marine, ex-cop who moves quietly and mysteriously wearing shades even in the dark . . . when he's not scaring the bad guys with the red arrows tattooed on his deltoids, which are usually bare in sleeveless shirts.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on Aug. 21 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Missing-persons specialist Elvis Cole (Free Fall, 1993, etc.) thinks his fifth case is right up his alley: locate the blood family of white-hot TV actress Jodi Taylor, adoptive and concerned about her long-term medical history. So Elvis plunges into the Louisiana bayous, racing against another local shamus, and soon finds not only the bashful parents, but a secret about Jodi that nobody told him when he was first hired. So far, so good: the first half of this tale is so cunningly tailored to Elvis's strengths--the cocky confidence, the droll humor, the aw- shucks authority--that reading it is like scrunching into a comfy featherbed. But just as it seems the case is winding down, Elvis stumbles onto an elaborate plot to smuggle illegals into the country. Jodi, who's been promised confidentiality, has a hard time dealing with this development, and no wonder: Except for some shared characters, this second plot has nothing to do with what she thought was her book. It's a lot less tricky and inventive, too, though a lot more violent. Half a masterpiece is better than none, but you've gotta feel for poor Jodi, abandoned still again just when she thought she finally had it made.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback