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Wainwright Rufus:Want One Enhanced


Price: CDN$ 13.22 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Wainwright Rufus:Want One + Release The Stars + Poses (W/2 Bonus Tracks)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 35.08

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Sept. 23 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Enhanced
  • Label: Universal Music Group
  • ASIN: B0000C7PSW
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (147 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #10,865 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Oh What a World
2. I Don't Know What It Is
3. Vicious World
4. Movies of Myself
5. Pretty Things
6. Go or Go Ahead
7. Vibrate
8. 14th Street
9. Natasha
10. Harvester of Hearts
11. Beautiful Child
12. Want
13. 11:11
14. Dinner at Eight

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By FalseName on Sept. 24 2003
Format: Audio CD
"Want One" is quite easily my number one album of 2003 (and 2002, for that matter). I have never heard this incredibly talented man sound so utterly beautiful. Come to think of it, I've said that with each of his new albums.
Rufus's musical style and sense of orchestration have definitely matured over time. This album is like stepping into the mind of a guy sitting in a coffee shop or on the subway and reading this thoughts. He still hasn't lost that great sense of lyrical playfulness. Standout tracks include "Vibrate," "Oh, What A World," and "14th Street," and "Harvester of Hearts."
It's wonderful to find an album that brings one to tears with simply the music and the singer's voice. Through his excellent self-titled debut, and "Poses," I was waiting for THIS album from a wiser Rufus. "Not that I have that much to offer/God knows I have so much to gain." He's growing up.
Rufus, you are just . . . such a beautiful child.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Wanda102 on Feb. 14 2004
Format: Audio CD
Rufus Wainwright - Want One ([...])
"The statement is basically, 'I'm your knight in shining armor. I'm here to save you from Linkin Park." (Rufus Wainwright, referring to the cover of his new album, which features him in King Arthur-style metallics)
The new Wainwright album opens up with what sounds like a thousand Rufus' humming what becomes the vocal melody for the track "Oh What a World." It is, in fact, Rufus's own voice looped over itself well over a hundred times. how he'll duplicate it in concert, one never can tell. I believe he said something about cloning himself. Which only leaves the problem of where he'll put the full orchestra...
Which is a central theme to Want One. With vocals that alternate from delicate hush to commanding falsetto, all backed up by the biggest orchestra one could expect, Wainwright's new disc is full of the kind of triumphant declaration that is sometimes only found in the best of musicals.
Not to say that the album itself plays out like some campy Broadway production, but it does have sincere star-quality. Rufus sings with the kind of broken-heart honesty that is best conveyed by a solemn piano ballad (see his previous works, the self-titled and Poses albums), yet is preformed with serious attention to instrumentation. The combination works, with unbelievable results. The infectious lead tracks, "Oh What a World" and "I Don't Know What It Is" yank the listener face forward into Rufus' catty and, at long last, sober world. His soon-to-be-well-known addiction to Crystal Meth is a constant undercurrent to the albums tracks, as is his search for true love.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ian Murdock on Feb. 9 2004
Format: Audio CD
...but it helps. You can appreciate this album without absorbing or understanding a single word of it. That's something that any good album exhibits. Of course, Rufus' tired, mush-mouthed vocal delivery would mislead you to miss the energy and sarcasm in the words. Actually, it seems that the theme of the album is being ambitiously tired of the modern world, but even if I am blatantly misinterpreting it, you are guaranteed to be humming at least one passage from this if you buy it. The bombastic production is a blissful departure from what's been heard lately, as is Wainwright's vibrato. The sound may be occasionally repetitive, but it's too fascinating to fault him for. But "Beautiful Child" is the best recorded musical moment in years. That may be sound vague, but when you hear it you'll know, especially if you're a musician. And there isn't a track on here that you wish wasn't. Maybe this sort of thing can stick. I'd like to see less wasted effort on modesty, and more wasted effort on wit and detailed dramatic production...
Oh yeah, just noticed there are a few reviewers who don't like his voice. I'll try to say this politely... Please disregard those reviews, they represent a small, anal retentive percentage of the populus; and I have played Rufus to uniformly enthusiastic reviews from friends.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By turtle5 on Sept. 29 2003
Format: Audio CD
"Wainwright could be singing lists of names out of the phone book and it would still be more exciting and inventive than 99 percent of the other albums out there." - Zac Johnson
Rufus Wainwright is by far my favorite musician and his newest album is no less excellent than his phenomenal first two albums. This album may in fact be the most accessible for those who did not instantaneously fall in love with his previous songs. The key is to listen to the songs multiple times allowing them to become familiar to you, like reading poetry, every time you listen the lyrics and music become richer and reveal their exquisite layers of beauty, emotion, and greatness.
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By Richard Nelson on June 17 2004
Format: Audio CD
This is part of a planned pair-Want Two is due next year--so it's possible that in a few months I'll have some second thoughts about Wainwright's decision to cleave his bombastic efforts in two. On the other hand, W2 is supposedly the darker and more experimental half of the material from the sessions, so the division may have been an apt one.
Either way, Want One earns its five stars for several qualities. It's consistently good-there are songs that are better than the rest, but none that beg to be skipped. The slowest songs are the shortest, maintaining a flow that carries the album along. The best song of all, "Go or Go Ahead," is the longest, over six minutes of outburst that weaves myth and madness into a stunning package of sonic bliss. A microcosm for the album as a whole, the song builds for more than two minutes before erupting.
Lyrically dense, the album starts out in near nonsense territory with the repetitions of "Oh What a World" and builds to the poignant "Dinner at Eight," an almost tear-inducing finale that acknowledges Rufus's mixed feelings about his abandonment by his famous father. "I Don't Know What It Is" and "Movies of Myself" belong on Top 40 radio, where they could oust less intelligent pop; "11:11" sounds silly at first but makes profound the words " I was alive." Born of personal experience and genetically inherited musical genius, Wainwright's latest may be the finest album of 2003.
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