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Waking Nightmares Hardcover – Oct 15 1991


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--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Tor Books (Oct. 15 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312852509
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312852504
  • Product Dimensions: 16.4 x 3.5 x 24.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 431 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,126,999 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Ramsey Campbell has won more awards than any other living author of horror or dark fantasy, including four World Fantasy Awards, nine British Fantasy Awards, three Bram Stoker Awards, and two International Horror Guild Awards. Critically acclaimed both in the US and in England, Campbell is widely regarded as one of the genre's literary lights for both his short fiction and his novels. His classic novels, such as The Face that Must Die, The Doll Who Ate His Mother, and The Influence, set new standards for horror as literature. His collection, Scared Stiff, virtually established the subgenre of erotic horror.

Ramsey Campbell's works have been published in French, German, Italian, Spanish, Japanese, and several other languages. He has been President of the British Fantasy Society and has edited critically acclaimed anthologies, including Fine Frights. Campbell's best known works in the US are Obsession, Incarnate, Midnight Sun, and Nazareth Hill.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
When it comes to chilling examinations of the decaying mind, no one does it better than Ramsey Campbell. Whether the decay is literal (i.e. his mad killer stories) or symbolic (the supernatural stuff), no other writer can summon of the level of dread, isolation, and despair that Campbell can. Waking Nightmares gathers together stories from Campbell's early years (i.e. Jack In The Box) as well as his more recent work. Although some of the stories are a tad predictable (especially if you have read a great deal of Campbell's work), each is powerful in its own quiet way. I can't think of a better way to give yourself the heebie-jeebies than by reading anything by Ramsey Campbell. Highest recommendation.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
No one chills more with less than Campbell does. Dec 25 2003
By Chadwick H. Saxelid - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When it comes to chilling examinations of the decaying mind, no one does it better than Ramsey Campbell. Whether the decay is literal (i.e. his mad killer stories) or symbolic (the supernatural stuff), no other writer can summon of the level of dread, isolation, and despair that Campbell can. Waking Nightmares gathers together stories from Campbell's early years (i.e. Jack In The Box) as well as his more recent work. Although some of the stories are a tad predictable (especially if you have read a great deal of Campbell's work), each is powerful in its own quiet way. I can't think of a better way to give yourself the heebie-jeebies than by reading anything by Ramsey Campbell. Highest recommendation.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
This book once again proves that Campbell is the master March 7 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Ramsey Campbell is the scariest writer of fiction there is. This collection of short stories once again proves that well known fact. A student from the H.P. Lovecraft school of horror, campbell takes the reader on a phsycological journey through the most sacred and untouched realms of our minds, the realm of fear. If you read one book of horror short stories this should be it, because once you've had a taste of campbell you're hooked.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
intruiging, scary, exhillarating, wonderfully moody June 10 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Campbell again shows himself to be a master of mood and atmosphere with a collection of tales of a wide variety of setting and tone. Studied and effective, understated horror. In fact, he accomplishes better than horror (revulsion at something that has happened) and instead achieves terror (fear of something that *may* happen), which is Stephen King's stated highest goal. Thouroughly recommended.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Mostly Mediocre July 29 2012
By M. Weller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I had heard of Ramsey Campbell as a well recognized voice in horror. However, after reading this collection of stories I seriously question why. Campbell does deserve credit for some decent ideas but every story boils down to the same thing: Too much description and a vague or lame ending. Campbell puts King to shame with his description of every...single...thing. After 3 stories, I could care less what the color of the leaves are or what shape the cracks in the living room wall appear to be. It also kills the buzz the 15th time you read about about shadows "that seem to contain more". Each story is a practice in over description followed by an ending that does not fit anything contained in the story or else you see it coming early on. It almost feels like the author lost speed towards the middle of each story and was running on fumes by the end. I feel no desire to read another Campbell story again.


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