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Walden and Civil Disobedience Paperback – Aug 25 1983


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (Aug. 25 1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140390448
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140390445
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.8 x 19.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 363 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #296,000 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

A Note on the Text and Title of "Civil Disobedience" and the Text of Walden I. Civil Disobedience II. Walden 1. Economy 2. Where I Lived, and What I Lived For 3. Reading 4. Sounds 5. Solitude 6. Visitors 7. The Bean-Field 8. The Village 9. The Ponds 10. Baker Farm 11. Higher Laws 12. Brute Neighbors 13. House-Warming 14. Former Inhabitants; and Winter Visitors 15. Winter Animals 16. The Pond in Winter 17. Spring Conclusion III. Contexts and Comments Angelina E. Grimke, from "Appeal to the Christian Women of the South" (1836) William Whipper, from Speech Delivered at the First African Presbyterian Church (1837) William Lloyd Garrison, "Declaration of Sentiments" (1838) Orestes A. Brownson, from "The Labroring Classes" (1840) Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Man the Reformer" (1841) Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, from "Plan of the West Roxbury Community" (1842) Charles Lane and A. Bronson Alcott, from Letter to A. Brooke (1843) Henry Highland Garnet, "Address to the Slaves of the United States of America" (1843) George Ripley, "Life in Association" (1845) William Henry Channing, "To the Associationists of the United States" (1846) Louisa May Alcott, "Transcendental Wild Oats" (1873) Mary Wilkins Freman, "A Church Mouse" (1891) Leo Tolstoy, Letter to Dr. Eugen Heinrich Schmitt (n.d., c. 1895) Leo Tolstoy, "The Beginning of the End" John Albert Macy, "Thoreau" (1908) Mohandas K. Gandhi, A Selection from His Writings, 1919-1940 Martin Luther King, Jr., from Stride Toward Freedom (1958) Martin Luther King, Jr., "A Legacy of Creative Protest" (1962) Works Cited For Futher Reading --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Henry David Thoreau (1817-62) was born in Concord, Massachusetts and educated at Harvard. He became a follower and a friend of Emerson, and described himself as a mystic and a transcendentalist. Although he published only two books in his lifetime, Walden (from which this book is taken) is regarded as a literary masterpeice and one of the most significant books of the 19th century.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Thoreau's collected works in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau (Boston, 1906) will eventually be superseded by The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau (Princeton, 1971- ), a more complete edition that incorporates modern textual principles in its editing. Read the first page
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
You will hear many people describe Thoreau as a transcendentalist philosopher whose two-year-and-two-month experimental habitation in the woods was a defiant yawp of solitude in an age of great societal refinement. You will hear even more people describe Thoreau as a fraud - a man who was too lazy to get a job, and whose "solitude" consisted of raiding his auntie's cookie jar every Sunday afternoon. What too many overlook is the great accomplishment not of his life, but of his literature. Walden is one of the most meticulously crafted works in the American canon, and it reads like a prose-poem ode to the sublime beauty of nature and the resilience of the self-reliant individual. Despite what some may say, his philosophy resounds even more triumphantly and urgently today, when solitude is disappearing (except, of course, within oneself) and society is cheap. Thoreau's ruminations continue to have a great impact on his professed audience - "poor students" - but his economic lessons should be required reading for anyone and everyone entering the professional world. No one has written more eloquently on the experience of man in nature, and the fleeting achievement of wholeness that we sometimes feel in perfect moments of stillness and solitude.

A note on the edition: This copy of Walden has survived with me from the rolling hills of the Blue Ridge Mountains to the jagged peaks of the High Sierras, from Parisian parks to Montreal blizzards, and, most remarkably, through a mess of a thesis. Needless to say, it is compact and durable, set in pleasurable type and very reasonably priced. The inclusion of 'Civil Disobedience' is a necessary one, and the poems are harmless, if nothing more. Books don't come much more perfect than this one.
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Format: Paperback
Thoreau lived for two years and two months at Walden Pond. He said the mass of men live lives of quiet desperation. Henry Thoreau asked hard questions.
He related that when the Masschusetts Bay Colony was founded, earthen houses were built. They were convenient and suitable and they had the advantage of putting everyone in a position of equality and not making the poorer inhabitants feel discouraged. It distressed Thoreau that a good deal of the money spent for shelter and dress was for show, uneconomical.
He farmed organically because he was only a squatter. He found that by working for about six weeks he could meet all of the annual expenses of living. He claimed that memorable events transpired in the morning.
Thoreau went to the woods because he wished to live deliberately. The sounds of the railroad penetrated the woods. Visitors were frequent during three seasons. In the wintertime basically he had only himself for company and some of the animals.
In any season, the woods were surprisingly dark at night. Because he had no helpers or animals to assist him in cultivating the fields he felt that he ws more intimate with the beans in his beanfield. Songs have suggested that husbandry is a sacred art.
The scenery of Walden was on a humble scale. The first ice was especially interesting. He reported seeing fox, jays, chickadees, and red squirrels in the the winter.
In CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE he asserts that in a government that imprisons unjustly, the place of a just man is in prison. Thoreau underwent an overnight jail stay when he failed to pay a poll tax.
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Format: Paperback
Compared to books such as "Voluntary Simplicity" by Duane Elgin and similar books, one realises that many of these ideas are nothing new when one reads Walden by Thoreau. In fact, what strikes me is that we as a Western society have not overcome many of the issues pointed out by Thoreau 150 years ago. Thoreau left Concord MA "disdainful of America's growing commercialism and industrialism", the slavish materialism of that society then. One wonders what he'll say if he would see the extend today - in the post Coca-Cola society. But then Thoreau was a man who clearly stepped to his own drum. Becuase of slavery, he refused to support the state on moral grounds. How would his views have been tolerated today?
I am not luddite, but my favourite quote from the book is this: "We are in great haste to construct a magnetic telegraph from Maine to Texas; but Maine and Texas, it may be, have nothing to communicate". Does this say something about the Internet, newsmedia and our contemporary information overload, or what?
I liked the introduction and footnotes of Meyer. Just enough to provide context and explanation, but never intrusive. This book is as relevant today as it was during Thoreau's lifetime. Highly recommended.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
H.D. Thoreau is the first and most important figure in U.S. Radicalism. This collection provides the essential background for the latent radicalism inherent in American politics, especially as it was vocalized in the Civil Rights and Anti-War movements of the 1960's.
Disobedience is the shorter of the texts, but probably more important. It is an attempt to justify moral anarchism and a call to act on individual judgements about justice.
Walden can be interpreted as an important treatise against consumerism and the dangers of specialization, as well as an appreciation of the natural environment. Those interested in anti-globalization/anti-free trade movements would do well to read Walden to gain an understanding of where anti-consumerism came from and an examination of its ethical implications. However, it also pays to remember that Walden is a failed experiment and, in the end, Thoreau returns to Cambridge.
Thoreau, as political philosophy, has certain problems. Moral anarchy and denial of the social contract is difficult to replace in civil society--Thoreau makes no more than the most vague references as to what could replace it, seeming to rely on the fact that his personal sense of justice is universal.
Nevertheless, Thoreau's conscience has resonance and is as relevant today as ever. His rejection of consumerism as the basis for society and its stratification also teaches important lessons.
Thoreau represents that first step in understanding the other part of American political thought--extremely different from that of the Constitution and Federalist Papers--but with profound connections to the work of Dr. Martin Luther King.
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