CDN$ 123.11 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
In Stock. Sold by thebookcommunity_ca
Add to Cart
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.

More Buying Choices
  • Add to Cart
    M and N Media Canada
    CDN$ 121.87 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

War Game/Culloden


Price: CDN$ 123.11
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by thebookcommunity_ca.
3 new from CDN$ 121.87 4 used from CDN$ 83.99

Product Details



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 17 reviews
58 of 59 people found the following review helpful
What Independent Cinema is Supposed to Be July 27 2006
By John Capute - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Why it has taken all this time for these two films to make it to the US in DVD form is a story that I hope comes out. Peter Watkins is finally being ackowledged in the US for his radical, truly independent vision, what with the release in the last two years of Punishment Park and The Gladiators. But it is here, in his first two feature films, that he is arguably at his best. The War Game is a horrifying recreation, done in documentary style, of what the effects of nuclear war would be. It may not have the impact it had when it was first released in 1964 as the US and the Soviet Union had their fingers on the button that would have assured, as the film so disturbingly shows (so disturbingly that the BBC, who commissioned the film, refused to show it and it was effectively banned in England for years after), mutual destruction. Nonetheless, the threat of nuclear warfare has not totally disappeared from the radar screen, so the film still carries relevance. Culloden, which predates The War Game, is perhaps the more contemporary and frightening film. Here, Watkins introduces for the first time in a feature length piece his "you-are-there" technique, as participants in the Scottish uprising against Britain in the mid-eighteenth century are interviewed as though news and camera men existed at this time. Both films reek with realism, as they are acted by non-professionals; and in the case of Culloden, the grime and sweat of eighteenth century life and the ferocity and brutality of combat at this time comes across as though, indeed, cameras were available at this time. Watkins is clearly aghast at what people can do to each other, and Culloden, culminating with the massacre of the Scottish clans by the better armed and more ruthless British military, clearly, as Watkins himself as said, is another way of looking at what was occuring and would continue to occur in Vietnam. Today, with another war, the film retains its power and relevancy. These are not easy films to watch: they are no doubt one sided and pedantic: yet they speak to a time when filmmakers were willing to alienate and confound in order to make what they felt was a difference: a time when the idea of popular film instigating change, naive as it may be, felt possible.
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
a pair of lost masterpieces Dec 4 2006
By Jonathan Lapin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
a double bill of films made for bbc-tv, i had seen both of these some thirty years back and never got over them. the earlier of them, "culloden" is a recreation of the events leading up to and following the 1746 battle that spelled the final end of scotlands days as a seperate country from england. adapted from the classic book by john prebble (incidentally, the rabbits favorite book), the film is a brilliant reflection on the conflicts among the idiotic bonnie prince charlie and his advisors, the ruthless english army, and the average scottish soldieer caught in the crossfire. filmed on a minimal budget (they had ONE cannon!), the battle scenes are so creative that you will believe youre part of it. this was the old walter cronkite "you are there" concept taken to the heights of art. now as to "the war game" -- well, once watkins had a major surprise hit on his hands with "culloden", he got to make "war games". akin to the similar path of patrick mcgoohan a few years later, who followed up the overwhelming success of "secret agent" with the artistically brilliant but controversial "the prisoner", watkins shot his wad with "WG", and never recovered. this fantasy about an english town in the days leading up to and following a nuclear attack is far more frightening than any of the myriad of other films which have used the same conceit. its matter-of-factness and use of ordinary people in lieu of actors works in watkins's hands in a manner that would have been artsy in the hands of another director. the finished product proved so controversial that the bbc declined to air it, and the movie was ultimately released in theaters, where ironically it won an oscar as best documentary. as i said previously, i saw both films on television in the 70s -- back when pbs still carried out its mandate to air quality television, rather than wayne dyer infomercials or doo-wop retrospectives. i cant more heartily recommend a dvd to watch than this.
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
The first and the best Sept. 17 2006
By Pablo Martin Podhorzer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Watch this and after ask yourself how two films made in 1964 and 1965 are many times more powerful than most of the drivel you saw during this decade. The western world was during forty years scared to death with the idea of nuclear war but accepted it as a possibility. After "The War Game" and "Culloden", you will doubt also the reasons for the current war "on terror".
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
cinema masterpieces restored Nov. 13 2011
By Robert D. Harmon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Two Peter Watkins films here, pioneering examples, perhaps, of what we now call "mockumentaries", documentary-style films of fictional events (here, "The War Game") or past, you-are-there events (Culloden).

As for "The War Game," although it's very much a work from the Cold War era (1965) it's still effective in spite of, or perhaps because of, it being black-and-white, gritty, short in running time, and focused on a small part of a pre- and post-attack Britain. I've seen "Testament," "Threads," and "The Day After" and this seems more effective -- and more graphic -- and while the other three nuclear-attack films show a story, "The War Game" is more immediate. You are watching society coming apart in almost real time, and it's scary.

I differ from other reviewers in that I find that "Culloden" seems to have aged well, if you accept 1964 state-of-the art news media in 1745 as a premise. Given the few actors, and some clever camera angles, the story manages to suggest fragmentary and smoke-shrouded parts of the battle as believable (in a battle that involved 15,000 men in real life). No spectacle, just confusion and the sort of narrow field-of-vision that those caught in such a battle would see, with the participants talking to the camera as the battle unfolds, horribly wrong. The Greek-chorus commentary on the pre-battle failures on the Scottish side does not take away from the story, rather, the viewer is watching an unfolding and inevitable tragedy. Nor does the film neglect the post-battle search-and-destroy by the victorious British forces, in many ways as harrowing as the battle. And you learn something of the participants, famous or not, Scottish, British and Irish (they were there, too, as you see).

Highest recommendation for those with an interest in British/Scottish or cinematic history.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
An Uncomfortable Close-Up of the Horrible Face of War Feb. 17 2012
By drqshadow - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
A chilling pseudo-documentary dedicated to the measures England had in place to deal with nuclear attacks during the cold war era. Framed as a newscast interspersed with short, stern-faced lectures and quotes from the experts, it's a brutally honest glimpse into the horrors that were looming around every corner. Since it is, at heart, a public service film, it falls into a few of the associated traps - a low budget, obviously staged setups, a flood of monotone speakers glaring directly into the camera - but the unflinching approach it takes to such a powerful, intense subject excuses most of those shortcomings. By no means a party picture, it's still a fascinating look into how poorly prepared humanity was (and still is) for the mutual destruction its nations were flirting with, almost playfully, at the time. Chillingly effective, alarmingly grounded and hauntingly vivid - our trigger-happy national leaders could stand a modern viewing, lest the concept of nuclear war become too abstract.


Feedback