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We Are What We Are [Blu-ray]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Ambyr Childer;Kelly McGillis;Michael Parks;Wyatt Russell
  • Directors: Jim Mickle
  • Format: AC-3, DTS Surround Sound, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: eOne Films
  • Release Date: Jan. 7 2014
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00FXOO2A2
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #4,365 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

The Parkers have always kept to themselves, and for good reason. Behind closed doors, patriarch Frank rules his family with a rigorous fervor, determined to keep his ancestral customs intact at any cost. As a torrential rainstorm moves into the area, tragedy strikes and his daughters Iris and Rose are forced to assume responsibilities that extend beyond those of a typical family. As the unrelenting downpour continues to flood their small town, the local authorities begin to uncover clues that bring them closer to the secret that the Parkers have held closely for so many years.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Corey Lidster TOP 50 REVIEWER on Oct. 25 2014
Format: Blu-ray
I was going to say that 'We Are What We Are' is the best cannibal film I've ever seen, thinking that might be humorous at the microscopic or subatomic level. Then I realized I've seen quite a few movies that prominently featured cannibalism, as well as a surprising contingent for which cannibalism was the central theme: Silence of the Lambs, Ravenous, Alive, Soylent Green, The Hills Have Eyes, Sin City, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Wrong Turn, The Road, Motel Hell, and Delicatessen. Then there's an entire sub-species of exploitation film, known simply as 'The Cannibal Genre', which was an Italian phenomenon of the 1970's. And Zombies could be considered dead-ish, rotting cannibals, if you decide to cast the net a little wider... While the competition is quite a bit tougher than I originally thought, I still think this is the best film ABOUT cannibalism I've seen. It approaches an inherently sensationalistic subject with the maturity and simmering reserve of Eastwood's 'Mystic River', refusing to portray the characters as monsters.

This is not a formulaic Hollywood horror flick. It's a haunting and horrifying drama with beautiful cinematography, about a family whose colonial ancestors were driven to Donner party extremes by the harsh winters of a not-so abundant New World. The human mind finds clever ways to let the survivors of such a traumatic ordeal live with what they've done. Justifying it as the will of God, and finding scriptural basis for 'transubstantiating' the act of cannibalism from atrocity to sacred ritual, is actually quite believable. Catholics and Protestants have killed one another over...
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
“What in the world was I thinking” about what you said, oh of course, this movie, nice slow pace,
then this thing hit you, especially the most bizarre and “Shocking ending you will ever, ever See,
This is the Re-make of the Spanish speaking movie out of Mexico, “We Are What We Are” is a movie you
will soon not forget, if you decide and has the stomach to endure it’s outcome, weak stomach, stay away,
the way Director “Jim Mickle shot this, is nothing more than outstanding, the rainy atmosphere that we see
from the very fist opening scene of the movie, when Mrs. Parker, head into town to get supplies for the family,
from there on this movie takes on a slow ride, like you don’t know what’s going to happen, everything was
going through my mind, trying very hard to figure out it’s outcome, from the four main characters of the movie,
or I should say five, which includes the doctor, played be Michael Parks” I remember him from, (“From Dusk Till Dawn”
the very first scene in the corner store") played their part to an absolute perfection, Bill Sage” Ambyr Childers” and
Julia Garner” plus little Nick Damici” hope they had a green screen so that kid couldn’t see that one scene of mayhem,
if you think Hannibal Lector was gross, this one overshadow that by a mile, may not be in story wise but Oh Boy,
but the ever, ever, ever, unrecognizable “Kelly McGillis” not until the end credits did I know it was her, see if you can,
she was also in “Stake Land” and I didn’t know it, till the end, I warn you again, weak stomach stay away,
English 5.1 DTS-HD master Audio.
2.35:1 Widescreen.
Runtime 105 Min.
This Dinner Will Leave A Very Bad Taste In Your MOUTH....
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 75 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Lamb Sunday Dec 17 2013
By Dayna Newman/Slasher Diva - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
This remake of the 2010 Spanish speaking film from Mexico is very different with many changes one of which is the genders of the main characters.This film takes place in the backwoods where as the original was in the inner city.They focus more on religion or what this family has come to know as religion.

The acting was superb ,Bill Sage was exceptionally good as the patriarch of the family " Frank Parker" impressive performances were also turned in by Julia Garner and Ambyr Childers as Iris and Rose Parker ,Frank's two daughters.

The scenery was beautiful and beautifully shot, the dreary, rainy look lent to the Gothic feel of the film.The gore was turned down in comparison to a lot of other films of this nature but they let you have it when really needed.I would give it a 5 on the gore scale of 1-10.the effects ran from very well done to just ok.

The story was given another layer with the always great Michael Parks as the town doctor who's daughter disappears years earlier and due to flooding in the area he finds human remains in the form of bones in the Parker's creek thus leading him on a mission to unfolding the mystery of how and why she went missing.The third act is really exciting as there are showdowns and power struggles leading into a shocking and brutal climax.Both this and the original are good films that I highly recommend.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Good film but beware... Feb. 3 2014
By J. Isaacs - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This film will not be for everyone. Some might find it slow, others will sense the tension building. You might think you know what is going to happen but you don't. This is such a bizarre combination of indie film art and offbeat horror. I don't how else to describe it. I enjoyed it but was definitely macabre.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Very well-acted and it sucks you right in from the start Aug. 3 2014
By Farrah T. Giroux - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Very creepy and very spooky because it appears so normal and humdrum. Very well-acted and it sucks you right in from the start. Look out for that dinner scene, it's a doozy. For one of the few times in my life, I'll say that I liked this version better than the original.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Where the Meat Comes From Oct. 25 2014
By Corey Lidster - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
[[SPOILERS]]
I was going to say that 'We Are What We Are' is the best cannibal film I've ever seen, thinking that might be humorous at the microscopic or subatomic level. Then I realized I've seen quite a few movies that prominently featured cannibalism, as well as a surprising contingent for which cannibalism was the central theme: Silence of the Lambs, Ravenous, Alive, Soylent Green, The Hills Have Eyes, Sin City, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Wrong Turn, The Road, Motel Hell, and Delicatessen. Then there's an entire sub-species of exploitation film, known simply as 'The Cannibal Genre', which was an Italian phenomenon of the 1970's. And Zombies could be considered dead-ish, rotting cannibals, if you decide to cast the net a little wider... While the competition is quite a bit tougher than I originally thought, I still think this is the best film ABOUT cannibalism I've seen. It approaches an inherently sensationalistic subject with the maturity and simmering reserve of Eastwood's 'Mystic River', refusing to portray the characters as monsters.

This is not a formulaic Hollywood horror flick. It's a haunting and horrifying drama with beautiful cinematography, about a family whose colonial ancestors were driven to Donner party extremes by the harsh winters of a not-so abundant New World. The human mind finds clever ways to let the survivors of such a traumatic ordeal live with what they've done. Justifying it as the will of God, and finding scriptural basis for 'transubstantiating' the act of cannibalism from atrocity to sacred ritual, is actually quite believable. Catholics and Protestants have killed one another over... well, lots of things, one of them relating to the meaning of Christ's words and deeds at 'The Last Supper', and whether or not the unleavened bread distributed as part of the 'blessed sacrament' actually becomes the literal flesh of Christ upon consuming it. An 18th century diary kept by the eldest daughter becomes a religious document of sorts, and scenes dramatizing the history it records are interspersed with the modern-day chain of events that 'precipitate' the Parker clan's demise.

The story begins with a storm that causes widespread flooding in the rural American community in which the film is set. The mother of the Parker family dies in the opening minutes of the film, drowning in a shallow pool of water... although the moments that precede her accident tell the viewer a great deal about the family's sinister secret. As the two teenaged daughters and youngest son struggle to help their father, who is presumably weakened by the severity of his grief, clues pointing toward the exact nature of this secret are everywhere. As the floodwaters wash human bones from their property downstream, the town's doctor -- whose daughter was one of the many to go missing in the area -- follows the truth upriver. When the sickening reality that the viewer suspects is finally made graphically clear, their fathers condition forces the daughters to kill the 'livestock' and process the meat themselves. The traumatic experience is exacerbated by the appearance of the older girls' childhood boyfriend, who is now a deputy helping the doctor with his investigation.

The finale is appropriately gruesome, but I didn't find it as shocking as some people obviously did. Knowing absolutely nothing about this film, after examining the cover image and the critic's blurb about the 'shocking climax', I imagined a scenario that was pretty damn close; check out the photo for yourself and make a guess... you'll probably figure it out.

As for the performances -- 'They Are What They Are', and that is friggin' brilliant. Statements like that get thrown around too much, and I'm one of the culpable parties. But the layers of guilt and grief that bleed through the stony southern resolve of the various Parkers is something beautiful to behold. Michael Parks, who is experiencing a late-career renaissance thanks to fans like Quentin Tarantino and Kevin Smith, justifies all the adulation he's received for films like 'Red State' once again. This is an absolutely compelling film. Even though you can guess at some of the 'bare bones' of the tale, it's impossible to look away... and the writer-director has plenty of surprises you won't see coming.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
I found it gripping and beautifully shot. The young actresses playing the daughters were ... Oct. 14 2014
By Allison Nible - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
The thinking man's horror film. Having not seen the original, I can't speak to this film's faithfulness. However, I found it gripping and beautifully shot. The young actresses playing the daughters were compelling. Loved the ending.

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