Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

We Are What We Are [Blu-ray]

Ambyr Childer;Kelly McGillis;Michael Parks;Wyatt Russell , Jim Mickle    R (Restricted)   Blu-ray

List Price: CDN$ 29.99
Price: CDN$ 22.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
You Save: CDN$ 7.00 (23%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Wednesday, July 30? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Frequently Bought Together

Customers buy this Movies & TV with You're Next [Blu-ray] CDN$ 19.93

We Are What We Are [Blu-ray] + You're Next [Blu-ray]
Price For Both: CDN$ 42.92

Show availability and shipping details

  • This item: We Are What We Are [Blu-ray]

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • You're Next [Blu-ray]

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product Details


Product Description

Product Description

The Parkers have always kept to themselves, and for good reason. Behind closed doors, patriarch Frank rules his family with a rigorous fervor, determined to keep his ancestral customs intact at any cost. As a torrential rainstorm moves into the area, tragedy strikes and his daughters Iris and Rose are forced to assume responsibilities that extend beyond those of a typical family. As the unrelenting downpour continues to flood their small town, the local authorities begin to uncover clues that bring them closer to the secret that the Parkers have held closely for so many years.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.4 out of 5 stars  76 reviews
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good film but beware... Feb. 3 2014
By J. Isaacs - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This film will not be for everyone. Some might find it slow, others will sense the tension building. You might think you know what is going to happen but you don't. This is such a bizarre combination of indie film art and offbeat horror. I don't how else to describe it. I enjoyed it but was definitely macabre.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars (BLU RAY REVIEW) Yum... April 28 2014
By M. Oleson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Blu-ray
There may be spoilers.

I'm going to assume that anyone who is interested in this movie understands what the general theme is. For those of you who don't, cannibalism is involved. So if that isn't what you're looking for in a horror film, you might want to look elsewhere.

While this remake of a 2010 Mexican film certainly qualifies as a horror film, there are no traditional "jump out" scenes and limited gore. The horror is the subject matter and how 2 young sisters, forced by tradition, have to carry out what they believe to be long standing family values. Director Jim Mickle certainly has a handle on drama and horror or to be more precise, suspense. It builds ever so slowly after the Parker family matriarch (Kassie DePaiva) dies mysteriously after fainting and hitting her head on a pipe. She falls into a partially water filled ditch and eventually drowns.

Set in upstate New York, a driving rainstorm causes flooding in the area. This manages to dislodge suspicious artifacts which begin to wash up on a creek bed. Discovered by the local coroner, Doc Barrow (a very good Michael Parks), wonders if they might be clues to the mysterious disappearance of numerous individuals, including his own daughter, over the years. An autopsy of Mrs. Parker provides more clues.

After Mrs. Parker is put to rest, patriarch Frank Parker confronts his two daughters. Iris (Ambyr Childers) is about 16 or 17 and as the oldest must be the chief chef as it were. Younger sister Rose (Julia Garner) is about 14 and takes responsibility for rearing younger brother Rory (Jack Gore). A neighbor, Marge offers to assist Frank but he puts her off. I didn't even recognize Kelly McGillis as Marge. Many horror-schlock fans may not be happy with the pace of the movie and a lack of gore throughout, but patience has its virtue. Others, settling in for a white-knuckled suspense drama, may be unhappy with the conclusion. It took me a day or two to think about it, but I concluded the final scenes are just about perfect.

The Blu ray disc comes in a 1080p video resolution and a 2.39:1 aspect ratio. While I noticed a brief bit of video noise, the film looks good overall. It appears the director and cinematographer purposely wanted a dull color grading. Some of which is due to the bleak home setting and the constant rainfall. The audio comes in DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1. I thought the sound effects were excellent in this film. The constant rain changes from a light drizzle to modestly dense rain to a raging storm. The surrounds are well utilized and the dialog properly centered. Subtitles are limited to English SDH in this Region A disc. Extras include a commentary track with the director, screenwriter Nick Damici and some of the actors, a 55 minute "making of" feature, a trailer and some interviews with the director, Sage and Garner.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Thank you for the sustenance we receive" April 14 2014
By Doug Park - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Dark, slow but steady film about the apparently normal Parker family, who share a macabre secret ritual. Excellent acting and cinematography bring an immediate realism that really carries this film. WARNING: If gore and grossness get to you, stay away. While WE ARE WHAT WE ARE is not just a constant schlock-fest, there is some pretty disturbing stuff here: Short but graphic scenes of an autopsy, etc.

There's been some debate about whether or not WAWWA is really a horror film, and I would vote a definite "yea" even though the whole mood and atmosphere are different (and better in many ways) than most contemporary horror flicks. There are some elements of suspense, but you know the big "secret" before it's halfway through--the cover also gives a decent hint--so it doesn't exactly work as a mystery. Regardless, the brief flashbacks to the family's ancestors in the 1780s add a great deal.

Though none of the individual elements here are anything that hasn't been done plenty of times before, WAWWA's whole combination of qualities make it a different experience. It's obviously low budget but still far from being another super-amateurish cheapie. The makers of this film did an excellent job with what they had to work with. There are some blank spots--e.g., the body in the water--and a little stronger sense of place would have been nice. At the same time, it's probably better that they don't explain every little thing away.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars DECENT MOVIE BUT... Feb. 15 2014
By MURIEL65 - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
It was a slow but good story, good actors, and even if soon enough you start to realize what this family dirty secret is, it is still keep you watching until the end...which end was, at least to me, a bit disappointing but I will not tell about it cause it would probably spoiled the entire movie... But if nothing else, you can rent this one... It may be slow but not boring at all, even suspenseful at some point...
4.0 out of 5 stars Free to be...you and me. July 28 2014
By Robert Beveridge - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
We Are What We Are (Jim Mickle, 2013)

Less than a minute into Jim Mickle's reimagining—one cannot call it a remake with a straight face—of Jorge Grau's fine 2010 film Somos lo que Hay, he has already made it plain to the viewer who has seen the previous film that We Are What We Are is a different movie indeed. The two movies start with the same event; the death of the head of a family. While that death is never explained in the 2010 film (the family gets a visit from the coroner about two-thirds of the way through this version with a cause of death, not that it matters), the two of them are virtually identical in the method in which each family member dies; it starts with a nosebleed, descends quickly into convulsions, and within seconds that person has shuffled off this mortal coil. It is the circumstances surrounding the two deaths that make all the difference. When Papa does in the 2010 film, he is in a large city. He is surrounded by people, yet he is utterly alone and anonymous. (One of the movie's finest, funniest, blackest scenes is the revelation of what happens to him after his death, which takes place in the following minute or so.) In the 2013 film, Emma Parker (Evil Dead II's Kassie DePaiva) is trying to beat a coming storm in a small backwoods town somewhere in Appalachia, frantically grabbing groceries, but still managing to have time to have a conversation with the clerk at the general store. (Yes, this town is small enough to still have a general store.) In the space of a couple of minutes, Jim Mickle has changed the sex of the dying parent and the type of city in which the family lives. This should be creating a string of “what if?”s in the head of any viewer who has seen the original movie. It is to Jim Mickle (Mulberry St.)'s credit that instead of doing this and then trying to shoehorn the rest of the movie into remake territory, he gives us, essentially, an entirely new film based on those “what if?”s. And it is a good one indeed, Jim Mickle's best film to date.

After Emma's death, her husband Frank (Mysterious Skin's Bill Sage), is distraught enough that his daughters, Iris (The Master's Ambyr Childers) and Rose (Martha Marcy May Marlene's Julia Garner), have to step up and take charge. Well, that's the way it looks at first, but here's where those amazing what-ifs start cascading; Emma and her family, it seems, are from a long line that stems from an entirely matriarchal culture, and so Frank is stuck playing second fiddle and, occasionally, enforcer. This is especially the case when the girls' younger brother Rory (Every Secret Thing's Jack Gore in his screen debut) starts to get close to Marge (Top Gun's Kelly McGillis), their nearest neighbor, and the friendship between the two threatens to expose the Parkers' long-held secrets.

Perhaps the biggest change to the original film is when those secrets are revealed. They become obvious in the original film not long after the two children (sons in that one) are forced to take over the family; here, they are held back longer, turned into a Big Reveal(TM). This could be because I've seen the original and am a fan of it, but I didn't think the skeletons in the family's closet were really as big a deal as that would lead one to think; in many ways, that seems to me the weakest link in this otherwise very good film. I hesitate to say that this is the best way to remake a movie, but it is certainly a far sight better than the vast majority of remakes that have been coming out of Hollywood for the past ten or so years. Imaginations ran wild when Mickle and longtime partner in crime Nick Damici were putting this script together, and most everything falls into place pretty nicely; those pieces that had to be forced or shimmed are minor, really, and We Are What We Are is a worthy descendant of the original film that manages to blaze its own trail successfully. *** 

Look for similar items by category


Feedback