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Weaving a Website: Programming in HTML, Java Script, Perl and Java Paperback – Aug 6 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 747 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall; 1 edition (Aug. 6 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0130282200
  • ISBN-13: 978-0130282200
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 4.3 x 23.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,068,901 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Inside Flap

Preface

A decade ago, the World Wide Web was nonexistent. Today, it is a pervasive part of our everyday lives. Web sites exist for every imaginable topic. The best sites are well-designed, easy to use, interactive, and error free. Since these sites typically include JavaScript™ scripts, Java™ applets, or Perl® scripts, creation of such sites requires programming.

Programming is not an obscure art form accessible only to computer science majors or hackers; it is a craft that shares many similarities with other crafts, such as woodworking, quilting, or model building. Mastery of any craft requires plenty of practice, the right tools, and knowledge of the vocabulary associated with the craft.

Practice is crucial because mastery of any craft depends upon experience. Throughout this book, readers are asked to think about the problem and a solution before they examine the code. Additionally, each chapter contains several practice exercises.

A programmer's key tool is the programming language used. Just as apprentices use simpler tools and techniques than do experienced craftpersons, a newcomer to programming will experience less frustration working in a simpler language. The book begins with the simplest of the web languages, HTML. This is only a mark-up language; the beginner learns to create simple, but static pages. The introduction of frames and images to HTML in chapters 5 and 6 produces visually appealing pages. These images were created with PhotoShop® (a commercial product available from Adobe Systems and not included with this text.) The book also covers three programming languages: JavaScript, Perl, and Java. Of the three programming languages discussed in this book, JavaScript is by far the easiest. The book also covers this language first, so that we can concentrate on learning programming fundamentals. Many of the concepts, vocabulary, and conventions that are introduced in the discussion of JavaScript apply to Perl and Java. Thus, learning the later languages will be easier.

An experienced programmer always wields an arsenal of testing techniques to ensure that pages are error free. These techniques are stressed throughout the book. Most web programming books do not discuss these techniques. Either they don't care, or they assume that the reader's code will work correctly.

As a teacher with more than twenty years experience, I know that programming can be a frustrating experience for beginners. It requires a level of accuracy and attention to detail that many of us initially lack. I believe in a progressive, hands-on approach. Any individual, if given clear instructions and visual examples, can learn to program. The examples chosen for the text cover a wide variety of topics. The book includes pages containing recipes, football terms, crossword puzzles, multilanguage dictionaries, suggestion boxes, opinion polls, Shakespearean quizzes, and bird identification pages. The examples are designed to rouse your interest and to encourage you to develop creative and imaginative web pages. I hope that you enjoy reading the book as much as I enjoyed writing it.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

First, I would like to thank the many students who helped class-test this book. Students in the Introduction to the Web class used drafts of Parts I and II. Computer Science students used drafts of Parts III and IV in upper-level courses. Special thanks to the Introduction to the Web instructors, Moreena Tiede, Paul Kapitza, and Roussanka Loukanova, for their many helpful suggestions.

I am also indebted to my office suite mates, Jorg Tiede, Lon Shapiro, and Chris Boucher. Jorg v patiently corrected my German in the several German-English pages. All my suite mates provided ongoing support for this project. Thanks also to Harold Grossman, Clemson University; Bert Lundy, Naval Postgraduate School; Scott Henninger, University of Nebraska; Rayford Vaughn, Mississippi State University; Marc Loy, Galileo Systems; and Jesse Heroes, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, who reviewed early drafts of this manuscript.

I would also like to thank our technical reviewers who took the time to review the manuscript: Harold C. Grossman, Computer Science Department, Clemson University; Berty Lundy, Computer Science Department, Naval Postgraduate School; Scott Henninger, University of Nebraska; Rayford B. Vaughn, Mississippi State University; Marc Loy, Galileo Systems, LLC; and Jesse Heroes, University of Massachussetts-Lowel.

I would also like to thank Petra Recter, Senior Acquisitions Editor, Prentice-Hall, for her ongoing support and encouragement. I thank Amy Waller, Publisher's Representative, Prentice-Hall, for bringing the manuscript to Prentice-Hall's attention. Thanks also to all of the other individuals at Prentice Hall who helped bring this book to fruition, with special thanks to Sarah Burrows and Rose Kernan.

I especially thank my husband, John, and my daughter, Jenny, for their ongoing support and patience. I appreciate their willingness to assume family chores so that I had additional time to write. And I owe a special debt of gratitude to my parents, Don and Jeanette Anderson, for all their assistance and encouragement over the years.

Susan Anderson-Freed
Bloomington, Illinois

From the Back Cover

Weaving a Web Site is a comprehensive and dynamic introduction to web programming that assumes no prior programming experience. The text begins with HTML and moves to progressively more complex languages: JavaScript, Perl, and Java. It contains over 200 programs chosen from a variety of topics designed to capture readers' interest and encourage them to use their imagination when developing web pages. Such topics include recipes, football terms, crossword puzzles, multi-language dictionaries, suggestion boxes, opinion polls, Shakespearean quizzes, and bird identification pages.

Weaving a Web Site emphasizes a hands-on approach that asks readers to participate in the design process of a web site. The book contains more than 1000 figures and 500 programming exercises designed to show readers how to translate their ideas into working web pages. Through an emphasis on the programming process, readers are shown how to develop progressively more complex web pages, while avoiding programming pitfalls and errors.

Distinguishing Features:
  • Covers concisely the following programming languages: HTML, JavaScript, Perl and Java.
  • Includes more than 1000 figures and 200 programs encouraging reader comprehension.
  • Emphasizes a hands-on approach that assumes no prior programming knowledge.
  • Extensively class-tested in a wide array of web programming courses.

Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

By A Customer on July 15 2003
Format: Paperback
I'm a former student of Dr. Anderson-Freed and I am currently a professional web developer. I have seen this book in two classes on web programming, the first time in a draft form and the second time in its current form. Having seen the errors and typos in the draft, and having pointed them out during class, I had hoped that the final print of the book would contain at least some of the corrections. Unfortunately, as another reviewer has pointed out, the book still contains numerous errors, typos, and just plain incorrect programming.
I still own a copy of her book because I have penned in corrections to many of the errors in the book. It covers a little bit of everything, and the little bit of reference I need for Perl and Java are met by this book and web references. However, I also currently own and recommend the HTML 4 Bible and JavaScript Bible, both published by IDG Books. I would recommend the Bible series of computer books over Dr. Anderson-Freed's book to anyone who requires a web-related programming reference. The same goes for IWU students who are taking her classes: don't buy this book. While her book contains many examples (many of which she uses in class), a good portion of her examples have code that does not produce the desired results. You would be better off reading another text and recreating the examples on your own.
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By A Customer on June 16 2003
Format: Paperback
This is an absolutely horrible, error ridden book. My college uses this book, with the knowledge how bad it is. The woman can't even get a logical true and false table correct! She does not even use the standard programing format in Javascript. If you want such garbage go ahead and buy it! There are other books that are more informative and without such numerous errors in the text.
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Format: Paperback
THis book is very very good
im in college and the webdesign teacher suggested a different book and i took a gamble and got this book instead and i love it
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
From a former student July 15 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I'm a former student of Dr. Anderson-Freed and I am currently a professional web developer. I have seen this book in two classes on web programming, the first time in a draft form and the second time in its current form. Having seen the errors and typos in the draft, and having pointed them out during class, I had hoped that the final print of the book would contain at least some of the corrections. Unfortunately, as another reviewer has pointed out, the book still contains numerous errors, typos, and just plain incorrect programming.
I still own a copy of her book because I have penned in corrections to many of the errors in the book. It covers a little bit of everything, and the little bit of reference I need for Perl and Java are met by this book and web references. However, I also currently own and recommend the HTML 4 Bible and JavaScript Bible, both published by IDG Books. I would recommend the Bible series of computer books over Dr. Anderson-Freed's book to anyone who requires a web-related programming reference. The same goes for IWU students who are taking her classes: don't buy this book. While her book contains many examples (many of which she uses in class), a good portion of her examples have code that does not produce the desired results. You would be better off reading another text and recreating the examples on your own.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Its pretty good March 19 2006
By Casey S. Lee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book isn't horrible. The guy above obviously is an ex-lover of the author and is none to happy. The book has excellent examples and walks through the basics of HTML, JavaScript, JAVA, and perl. After you have learned the languages it is awesome for using as a reference and refresher.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Error Ridden May 7 2007
By newby tech - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I used this text book in a class on HTML and Java Script. It was too riddled with errors to recommend as a good text book on programming. Previous classes have documented over a hundred errors in the text, and code samples; some minor, and some major. There are much better guides to programming than this book.

You may save money buying just this one book , but I did not find it money well spent.
5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Programming garbage; error ridden book June 16 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is an absolutely horrible, error ridden book. My college uses this book, with the knowledge how bad it is. The woman can't even get a logical true and false table correct! She does not even use the standard programing format in Javascript. If you want such garbage go ahead and buy it! There are other books that are more informative and without such numerous errors in the text.
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The best JavaScript out there July 1 2003
By Chris L. Bellach - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
THis book is very very good
im in college and the webdesign teacher suggested a different book and i took a gamble and got this book instead and i love it


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