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West


Price: CDN$ 9.49 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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21 new from CDN$ 6.92 14 used from CDN$ 2.66 1 collectible from CDN$ 34.22

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Price For Both: CDN$ 21.55

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Feb. 13 2007)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Universal Music Group
  • ASIN: B000LXHGFI
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #4,103 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Are You Alright?
2. Mama You Sweet
3. Learning How To Live
4. Fancy Funeral
5. Unsuffer Me
6. Everything Has Changed
7. Come On
8. Where Is My Love?
9. Rescue
10. What If
11. Wrap My Head Around That
12. Words
13. West


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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Esthero on Feb. 21 2007
Format: Audio CD
"West" is Lucinda's eighth studio album and simply quite brilliant. Nobody does that low-down dirty country blues like Lucinda, locking into a languid, aching groove and sending shivers down the spine of any living thing within range of that earthy vibrato.
Not that she is interested in staying within some country comfort zone, "Wrap My Head Around That" straying into uncharted territory.
It is not the first time she has slowed a lyric to spoken level, but this is a rhythmic bona fide country rap epic, a compelling narrative over nine minutes long, punctuated by snarling guitar chops and solos.

"Words" is another wise old tale written on that cracked parchment of a voice, wafting over an intoxicating melody.

She quotes her father, literature and poetry professor Miller Williams on West's sleeve notes: "You do not know what wars are going on down there where the spirit meets the bone", and these songs are a product of an internal turmoil caused by her mother's death and an intense relationship that spectacularly crashed and burned.

Put brutally selfishly, Lucinda's loss is our gain, gut-wrenching songs like "Unsuffer Me" burn with the agony and ecstasy of "Essence", and "Fancy Funeral" has the rare power to reduce grown men and women to tears.
She has assembled a great band including Bill Frisell, Jim Keltner and her long-time guitarist, the superb Doug Petibone, who do ample justice to this scintillating set of songs.
I like it. You will be moved, to say the least.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Hal Charles on Feb. 13 2007
Format: Audio CD
Loss and loneliness are at the core of Lucinda Williams' eighth album, "West".

The album's 13 songs together form a largely down-tempo disc, but "West" doesn't only find Williams in a somber mood.

"Mama You Sweet" is upbeat and "Come On" is a nasty, almost raunchy kiss-off, musically akin to "Atonement" from her last album, 2003's "World Without Tears".

She injects doses of hope and light in tracks like "What If", in which she imagines a world where the president wears pink and a prostitute is a queen.

"I get tired of people looking at my songs and feeling that they're all sad and dark. There's more to them than that. Some people might read Flannery O'Connor and see that as simply dark - and it is dark and disturbing - but there's a philosophical aspect, even a comical aspect to it as well. I think that's all there on this album. It's a full circle, like I've come through a metamorphosis", she says...

"West" is Williams's finest hour.

There are uncomfortable truths here, carried on easy-going melodies. "Fancy Funeral" is a wry look at death's priorities that flows as easily as drink.

Williams lost her mother and an errant lover as these songs were being written. These two truncated relationships fill "West" with exquisitely turned suffering; Williams and band provides the expert musical succour. Hal Wilner is the producer who organised this record's quietly unconventional sounds as Williams wanted them.

Equally raw and sensual is the unravelling blues of "Unsuffer Me", where Williams's ravaged voice begs: "Undo my logic/ Undo my fear" with an intensity that verges on the erotic.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Christi Serrao on March 20 2007
Format: Audio CD
Like her pervious albums, Lucinda Williams is very open and honest about her life, and isn't afraid to express her most personal feelings in her songs.

This album is probably her most confessional yet. The album deals heavily with love. But despite being released during Valentine's Day week, it is a very dark album. It deals with topics such as having anger at a lover, grief, and love that is lost. But it's not all bleak, as the album does also have tracks that deal with embracing the chance to change things. Williams is once again very open and honest with her emotions, and her frankness is in stark contrast to most of the cookie cutter music that gets released.

The music is also very good, and fits her vocals and tone perfectly. Some of the highlights include "Come On", "Learning how to Live", and "Wrap My Head Around That".

For anyone that likes to hear real emotion in their music, they certainly can't go wrong with this album.

The lyrics, combined with the music, make for an album that, while sad and dark at times, also shows that there are always rays of hope no matter how bleak things may seem.

Like flowers blooming through cracked city concrete, Lucinda Williams's music is a paradox: how can her songs, almost exclusively about death, loneliness and failure, be so beautiful and uplifting?

Nine albums in, Lucinda Williams has reached something approaching perfection.

Her voice traverses country smoothness to Marlboro-ravaged drawl with elegant ease while Bill Frissell's guitar twangs and howls and shimmers with otherworldly wonder. As befits the intimate nature of the lyrics, the arrangements get sparser as the album progresses - the barnstorming Are You Alright?
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 184 reviews
64 of 65 people found the following review helpful
A bluesy mix with a note of hope and redemption. March 2 2007
By joemacktheknife - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It may only be March but I have to say that this is going to be one of my records of the year.

Lucinda Williams has always been a peerless songwriter.She writes about lust, love, and losslike nobody else, and on this album, co-produced with Hal Wilner, she takes on such subjects as her mother's death, the state of the world, and yet another tumultuous relationship which ended badly. It's her usual tough stuff, but this time, Lucinda sneaks in a note of hope and even redemption in the very bluesy mix.

The album's 13 songs together form a largely down-tempo disc, but "West" doesn't only find Williams in a somber mood.

"Mama You Sweet" is upbeat and "Come On" is a nasty, almost raunchy kiss-off, musically akin to "Atonement" from her last album, 2003's "World Without Tears".

She injects doses of hope and light in tracks like "What If", in which she imagines a world where the president wears pink and a prostitute is a queen.

There are uncomfortable truths here, carried on easy-going melodies. "Fancy Funeral" is a wry look at death's priorities that flows as easily as drink.

Williams lost her mother and an errant lover as these songs were being written. These two truncated relationships fill "West" with exquisitely turned suffering; Williams and band provides the expert musical succour. Hal Wilner is the producer who organised this record's quietly unconventional sounds as Williams wanted them.

Equally raw and sensual is the unravelling blues of "Unsuffer Me", where Williams's ravaged voice begs: "Undo my logic/ Undo my fear" with an intensity that verges on the erotic.

Subtle and heroically blunt by turns, "West" is a meditation on abandonment and recovery, abandon and regret that deserves to be hauled out of the Americana ghetto and celebrated everywhere wounded hearts beat.

This collection sees her at her best with emotion, raw power and intoxicating, intense tunes which should appeal to much more than country and folk fans.

Four years on from "World Without Tear"s comes this studio album from Lucinda Williams, her eighth in a 37-year career - she doesn't rush.

OK, the predominant theme is pain, and no one does pain as eloquently as Lucinda - or as multifariously.

Yet "West" is all musical mood swings: from stoic, heartbreak country to fierce revenge rock, retro pop to folk, poetry to rap, mellow California to dark LA rock.

What makes Lucinda Williams such an important country artist, besides the excellent songwriting and that sultry, scarred southern voice, is her skill at stretching the genre's boundaries while mining its essence.

Which, often as not, is pain.
134 of 159 people found the following review helpful
Everything Has Changed Feb. 17 2007
By Lee Armstrong - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
On August 10, 2005 Lucinda Williams played at the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh. It was the last live concert that my wife and I saw together. Lucinda was touring in support of "Live @ the Fillmore" & said she was writing songs for a new record. As I recall, she played a new song she said she'd recently written, "Everything Has Changed." I preordered Lucinda's "West" set while my wife was still here. Today marks the fourth week since breast cancer ripped a giant unfillable hole in my universe. Lucinda lost her mother; and so themes of adjustment to loss not only resonate with me, they punctuate every breath I take. I spin the CD & Lucinda's gentle aching voice comes on, "Are you alight?" When people ask me that, I want to say, "He*l no!" But when she sings, "All of a sudden you went away; I hope you come back around someday; I haven't seen you in a real long time; Could you give me some kind of sign? Are you alright? ...Cause I've been feeling a little scared," it sounds like she's tapped into my inner dialogue as I look toward heaven and speak to the one I love. What an amazing song, "Just tell me that you're okay." If this were the only song on the CD, it'd be worth it.

"Unsuffer Me" is a grueling unflinching look at the pain of loss. Sometimes you have to stare it in the face to get through it. "Anoint my head with your sweet kiss, my joy is dead; I long for bliss," she sings as what I assume is Dan Pettibone's electric guitar churns mercilessly. Yet somehow the song achieves a magical dignity. During my wife's last weeks, my daughter said to me, "It's like watching a train wreck; you can't look away." There something of that strength that comes through in Williams' music.

Other cuts are also amazing. "Learning How to Live" is a breakup song, adjusting to loss. "Fancy Funeral" may sound a bit bizarre, but I can attest that my daddy and I had almost an exact same conversation in 2001 when my mother passed. The sheer force of Lucinda's anger in "Come On" puts a smile on my face as a classic bashed-breakup song, "Dude, you're so fired; shut up, I'm not inspired." "Words" has Lucinda's voice, weathered, worn & laden taking comfort in something she likes best, writing a good song.

Yes, Lucinda has an amazing catalog of recordings from "Happy Woman Blues" to the self-titled record to Car Wheels & World Without Tears. "West" takes a well deserved place at the table as one of her most compelling, moving works. Bravo!
25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
Heartfelt and carefully crafted Feb. 13 2007
By A. H. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
West marks a different direction for Lucinda Williams. Her last studio album, World Without Tears, was recorded live in the studio (i.e., the whole band is playing together simultaneously, not laying down separate tracks). That approach yielded a rugged and raw production that was a departure from the highly polished recordings embodied in Essence and Car Wheels, the two albums through which many of Lucinda's current fans discovered her. West does not have that "live in the studio" rawness, but it has a looser feel than Essence and Car Wheels. (I'm listening on good headphones with a good headphone amplifier; the recorded sound is gorgeous and the textures of the music and Lucinda's vocals are amazing.) It has that effortless quality that demonstrates just how much effort went into getting it right.

West shows that Lucinda has matured significantly. She worked out a lot of raw emotion through World Without Tears and the ensuing live album. West doesn't sound as edgy or raw as those recordings, though "Come On" does come close. At the same time, West also sounds more organic and earthy than many of the tracks on Essence. And as many reviewers are already pointing out, it doesn't sound the way Car Wheels does either. But it doesn't need to sound the way Car Wheels does. At first blush, West sounds like something of a new direction for her, but I get the sense that if you take the time to listen carefully, you'll recognize that the songwriting talents that have made her such a unique performer in our disposable age are here in spades. The songs and lyrics are as intimate, engaging, and heartfelt as anything she's written or sung in the past two decades, if not more so. There is something immediately familiar about them. They're great songs, just not the kind that are going to get you dancing on the lawn when you see her on a summer tour.

Posterity is a hanging judge, but I think time will prove this album's worth. I'm glad to have it. Recommended without reservation. Keep up the good work, Lucinda.
23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
Tortured Brilliance Feb. 22 2007
By moviegal - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Even though Lucinda Williams has looked for her joy from West Memphis to Slidell, she still hasn't found it- lucky for us. Finally, a record by Lucinda that surpasses Car Wheels.... This is her best work to date by far. Her lyrics are always superior and nothing has changed here in that respect. What has changed for the better in my opinion, is the music itself. The use of strings on this record is mesmerizing. It gives the music a full and complete feel-very deep and rich. And her lyrics blow me away- just listen to "What If" and "Mama You Sweet"- how does she do it????? This is an absolutely beautiful record- I think it's my favorite of 2007 so far. Raw, raunchy, sweet, funny, sad, and real. You can't beat that.
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
From The Heart Feb. 13 2007
By Double O Gator - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Let's start by saying that by today's standards, there are very few singer songwriters better than Lucinda Williams. It's almost unfair to compare it to her other work, because the bar has been set so high. With that said this one is still very good, although I would disagree with anyone that would call this her best yet. A previous reviewier stated that if you like "Essense" then you'll like this, and I have to agree with him. But "Essense" is still hard to top.
All and all, I do think that when we look back at the end of the year, and measure this C.D. with every other record put out by various artist, this one will still rank as one of the best of 2007. Great stuff as always by one of the best!

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