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Whatever And Ever Amen Explicit Lyrics


Price: CDN$ 21.62
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Product Details


1. One Angry Dwarf And 200 Solemn Faces
2. Fair
3. Brick
4. Song For The Dumped
5. Selfless, Cold and Composed
6. Kate
7. Smoke
8. Cigarette
9. Steven's Last Night In Town
10. Battle of Who Could Care Less
11. Missing The War
12. Evaporated
13. Video Killed The Radio Star
14. For All The Pretty People
15. Mitchell Lane
16. Theme From Dr. Pyser- Brendan O'Brien Studio Version
17. Air
18. She Don't Use Jelly- Lounge-A-Palooza Version
19. Song For The Dumped- Japanese Version

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 20 reviews
23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
Great album with filler tacked on. April 24 2005
By geekzapoppin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This album is considered by a lot of folks to be Ben Folds Five's best album. It certainly was their most commercially successful. Any way you slice it, it's purty darned good. This reissue sounds marginally better than the original release, but the selling point is ostensibly the seven extra tracks that have been included. Well, I'm here to tell you folks that they're not all gold. All of the tracks have been available officially and unofficially for some time and if you're a BFF fan, then most likely you already have them. "Video Killed the Radio Star", "She Don't Use Jelly", and "Air" are decent tracks but the others are strictly for completists only. If you don't already own the album, then by all means pick it up; the original is killer and worth the price alone. If you already have a copy of the original release, then the slight increase in sonic quality and the extra tracks aren't really worth shelling out another $15 to line the pockets of the record company. Go to Ben Folds' website and buy his recent EPs instead. He gets a much bigger cut of the money that way. ;)
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Fantastic! March 9 2007
By Alwin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Ben Folds/Five are one of the few artists (out of tons of genres that I like to listen to) that have risen to the top of the must-have-in-my-library list. This CD is worth more than it costs.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Outstanding! A Perfect Album! March 10 2006
By A Music Fan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This album is absolutely fantastic. It is a great album for listeners who would like to be introduced to the unique music of Ben Folds Five. The album, originally released in 1997, was the bands second album. It went out of print eventually, and so this version was released with improved sound quality, and seven b-sides tagged on. The opening track, "One Angry Dwarf And 200 Solemn Faces", was released as a single. It bursts with a furious piano riff by Ben. The song is a revenge anthem, portraying the life of a young kid who was bullied and picked on at school, who becomes to be a very successful star. "Fair" is one of my favorite tracks on the album. What makes this song so great is the chorus of Darren and Robert singing "Buh ba ba, buh ba ba, buh ba ba, bop ba ba ba ba". It gives the song a very old fashioned, unique feel. This song is a typical Folds love-story-gone-wrong song, with the famous phrase "All is fair in love". "Brick" was surprisingly the bands first, real radio hit. The song, which is written about a trip to the abortion clinic, is highly emotional in lyrics and in music. With a soft piano, and Robert on the double-bass, it has a somber jazz feel to it. "Song For The Dumped" was also released as a single. The song, written by drummer Darren Jesse is obviously about a recent experience of getting dumped by his girl. The song was originally recorded just for fun, as you may be able to tell by the conversation at the beginning. There was no intention on putting this on the album, but somehow, it made its way. This song really shows the bands great sense of humor, with the chorus "Give you my money back/give me my money back, you bitch/I want my money back/And don't forget/And don't forget to give me back my black t-shirt".

The next song on the album is "Selfless, Cold and Composed". It is written about the all american guy, struggling through relationships, unable to really show his true feelings to people. This is a great, slow, quiet song, clocking in at 6:10, it is the longest track found on the album. "Kate" was released as a single, and is one of my favorite songs by the band. It is a typical crush song, about a girl that you see everyday, but never have the courage to talk to. A great, upbeat song. "Smoke" is a very cool song, featuring Ben on mouth organ, and other unique instruments. The song is about not being able to escape past events in your life. "Cigarette", also known as "Fred Jones, Part 1" is a great interlude, clocking in at a little over a minute. The song is written about Ben's character Fred Jones, and his struggles through daily life. One of my favorite lyrics from the song. . . ". . . Set the house ablaze/With a cigarette"

"Steven's Last Night In Town" explodes out of the ending of cigarette. A fantastically upbeat, fun song. Written about Ben's friend, Steve, who lived with him in an apartment in North Carolina. Steven kept on saying that he would move out of the apartment. He did, but he always kept coming back. A great song with fun lyrics, and great harmonies from Robert and Darren.

"Battle Of Who Could Care Less" was the final single released from Whatever And Ever Amen. "Missing The War" is one of my personal favorite songs off of the album. It is the sister song to "The Last Polka" found on Ben Folds Five first, self-titled album. The meaning is pretty self explanitory.

The B-sides: Adding b-sides to an already perfect album is risky business, but is always great for the fans. The seven added tracks found on this re-issue are great, and add the the whole feel of the album. "Video Killed The Radio Star", originally written and performed by '80's band The Buggles, is a great cover by Ben Folds Five. "For All The Pretty People" is a great song, featuring a hilarious conversation between the band.

"She Don't Use Jelly" is another cover, originally performed and written by the Flaming Lips. The lyrics were changed and rearranged from the original song. Great cover. "Theme From 'Dr. Pyser'" is a great, catchy instrumental.

All in all, this is a fantastic album from Ben Folds Five. Highly recommend it.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Piano pop. April 22 2007
By Dr. Rock - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I had heard their song "Air" on the Godzilla soundtrack I had on cassette when I was in elementary school (don't ask me why I owned it). That song was pretty cool but I didn't really start listening to them. I strayed away from them, actually, because a local artist in my area sounds just like them (and I wasn't a fan of that local artist). It wasn't until a few weeks ago when I heard "Song For The Dumped." That hooked me in. After buying this album I was pleased to see the bonus b-sides they included. Like a lounge version of "She Don't Use Jelly" (originally by The Flaming Lips). All in all, very catchy piano pop.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Better than your average reissue March 29 2005
By G. Maynard - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
If you are a recent Ben Folds Five Fan, this is a great album to start with, as it contains many of the songs that launched the band to mainstream popularity including "Brick" and "Battle of Who Could Care Less." The reason you should start here, instead of with the original recording, are the extras... (Including a cover of "Video Killed the Radio Star," and the flaming lip's "She Don't Use Jelly.") Most reissues are simply a way to capitalize on a fan base that must have everything an artist has done. If you are looking to add to your Ben Fold's collection, this disc has a significant amount of new material which makes it better than your average reissue.


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