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Wheels Of Fire Original recording remastered, Live


Price: CDN$ 21.80 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
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Frequently Bought Together

Wheels Of Fire + Disraeli Gears + Fresh (Rm)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 40.84


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 7 1998)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Original recording remastered, Live
  • Label: Polydor / Umgd
  • ASIN: B0000067L3
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #13,118 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. In The Studio: White Room
2. In The Studio: Sitting On The Top Of The World
3. In The Studio: Passing The Time
4. In The Studio: As You Said
5. In The Studio: Pressed Rat And Warthog
6. In The Studio: Politician
7. In The Studio: Those Were The Days
8. In The Studio: Born Under A Bad Sign
9. In The Studio: Deserted Cities Of The Heart
Disc: 2
1. Live At The Fillmore: Crossroads
2. Live At The Fillmore: Spoonful
3. Live At The Fillmore: Traintime
4. Live At The Fillmore: Toad

Product Description

Product Description

Wheels of Fire topped Disraeli Gears in two ways. First, it found Clapton, Bruce and Baker growing yet further as players and writers. Second, it showcased both their studio artistry and live power, divided as it was between a studio half and live half. Here's the double-LP on 2 CDs: White Room; Crossroads; Anyone for Tennis; Politician; Spoonful; As You Said; Born Under a Bad Sign a certified rock classic!

Amazon.ca

Cet ultime chef-d'oeuvre du trio (mais non pas le dernier disque puisque Goodbye sortira au début de 1969) comprend un disque studio et un autre live. Le premier, en plus de reprises flamboyantes telles que "Sitting On Top Of The World" de Howlin' Wolf et "Born Under A Bad Sign" d'Albert King, réunit quelques titres parmi les plus aboutis de Cream, comme ce monument qu'est "White Room" (avec un Clapton littéralement indomptable à la guitare wah-wah). Quant au second, enregistré en mars 1968 au Winterland et au Fillmore West de San Francisco, il est l'occasion pour Clapton, Bruce et Baker, notamment sur "Crossroads" et "Toad", de rivaliser de virtuosité devant un public conscient de vivre un moment privilégié du rock. --Philippe Margotin

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
If you play, or have ever wanted to play, improvisational rock and roll, you must have this album. From a musical standpoint, this ranks as among the handful of most influential rock records ever made. Even now, more than 35 years after its making, it is a breathtaking tour de force of musical power and creativity.
I can't think of any live rock recording that comes close to matching the quality of simultaneous improvisation captured on disc 2 of Wheels of Fire. Many people think of Cream as Eric Clapton's band, but disc 2 proves it was a trio of three equally superb musicians. The 16-minute long "Spoonful" jam features a brilliant interplay of guitar (Clapton), drums (Ginger Baker), and bass (Jack Bruce) that builds to climax after climax.
It's hard to communicate now how revolutionary Eric Clapton's guitar work was in the late 1960s. All I can say is, his live solos on "Spoonful" and "Crossroads" inspired and challenged a generation of rock guitarists. Other guitarists may be faster than Clapton, but no one could match his ability to build melodic climaxes one after another.
Disc 1 consists of nine studio recordings that don't measure up to the intensity of the live performances on disc 2, but there are several excellent cuts. "White Room" is probably the most popular cut, but there are several good blues rock numbers--my favorite is "Politician"--featuring strong vocals by Jack Bruce as well as piercing guitar work by Clapton. Overall, if you are a fan of Cream or of blues rock in general, this is an essential CD of historical as well as musical significance.
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Format: Audio CD
Wheels Of Fire would be Cream's 3rd and final album released while they were still together. This was issued in 1968 when many rock bands, starting with the Beatles, would become more experimental with their studio releases. This would also be the first album to showcase their phenomenal live act.
Disc 1 is the studio disc and it's here where producer Felix Pappalardi would become almost as important to Cream as producer George Martin was to the Beatles. His use of many stringed instruments on tracks such as "Passing The Time", "Those Were The Days", and "Pressed Rat And Warthog" added a diversity that wasn't present on their first two releases. Although the songs here aren't as catchy as on Disraeli Gears, the haunting "As You Said", the driving "Deserted Cities Of The Heart", and especially the huge hit single "White Room" are among the best tracks they ever recorded. Their blues roots are still present here on the strong tracks "Sitting On Top Of The World", "Politician", and their killer version of Albert King's "Born Under A Bad Sign." Upon listening to this disc, it's apparent that Cream were clearly becoming Jack Bruce's band as his excellent vocals and bass playing are clearly the highlight here. Ginger Baker and especially Eric Clapton's playing here is more restrained when compared to their previous albums.
But Disc 2 is where the entire band shines like the sun. Cream were the first to take the improvisation of jazz and combine it with rock music and the results here are stunning. "Crossroads" has become synonymous with Clapton and his playing on this track, particularly his second solo, is among his most intense. Bruce's "Traintime" features some of the most fiery harmonica playing ever recorded.
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Format: Audio CD
Cream's debut album, "Fresh Cream", is undoubtedly their greatest album ever, but this epic comes very, very close. This would be the last album from blues/rock's greatest trio before they called it quits.
The studio disc is very good. Personally, I'm sick of people rambling on about "White Room" like it's a masterpiece or something. It's a good song, but hardly their best. "Sittin' On Top Of The World" and "Born Under A Bad Sign" are excellent blues songs with Clapton providing some superb licks. "Passing The Time" and "As You Said" are forgotten masterpieces that Cream fans never seem to mention (they also never mention "Rollin' And Tumblin'" from the debut album, which is hands down their greatest studio song ever). Both of these songs have a wonderful, haunting atmosphere that I just can't describe. The warm, Christmas-ey feel on "Passing The Time" is particulary enthralling, with Jack Bruce giving his best, most emotional vocal performance ever.
"Those Were The Days" is another great song, but "Pressed Rat And Warthog" is utterly stupid and the guitar solo on "Politician" just doesn't go anywhere. And "Deserted Cities Of The Heart" is pretty much boring.
But wait! Then we have the live disc! This features Clapton at his absolute best. Everyone knows that he jams his heart out on "Crossroads", giving new fire and passion to Robert Johnson's blues chestnut. But even better is the monstrous 17-minute version of "Spoonful", in which Eric plays perhaps the greatest solo of his life. I kid you not. He slowly, carefully builds up the tension until it approaches the 12-minute mark (about 11:50), when he brings it to a grand climax, delivering a frightening tidal wave of notes that just twists your insides in a knot.
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