Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

When in the Course of Human Events: Arguing the Case for Southern Secession Hardcover – Dec 29 1999


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 58.31 CDN$ 16.68

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers; illustrated edition edition (Dec 29 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0847697223
  • ISBN-13: 978-0847697229
  • Product Dimensions: 23.5 x 15.6 x 2.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 490 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (63 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,899,217 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By B. Byars on June 18 2004
Format: Hardcover
I wholeheartedly believe that the confederacy did not secede over slavery, that the north did not invade over slavery, that there is a constitutional right to secession, and that slavery was declining very quickly.
That being said, Mr. Adams' polemical work is not completely convincing.
The first problem is that while he footnotes much of what he says, there are some fairly controversial assertions that he does not. Another problem is that he hardly tackles the very explicit statements from Davis, Stephens, The Declaration of causes of secession for Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Texas.
The blatant statements of the reason for secession being slavery contained therein can be explained as political propaganda, much like the Bush adminstration's reasons for invading Iraq. Adams hints at this fact but does not pursue it.
A huge problem, one that made me almost want to give the book 1 star, was his blatantly deceptive selective quoting.
On pg. 95, Adams quotes an 1861 editorial in the New Orleans Daily Crescent as saying:
" They know that it is their import trade that draws from the people's pockets sixty or seventy millions of dollars per annum, in the shape of duties, to be expended mainly in the North, and in the protection and encouragement of Northern interests.... These are the reasons why these people do not wish the South to secede from the Union. They are enraged at the prospect of being despoiled of the rich feast upon which they have so long fed and fattened, and which they were just getting ready to enjoy with still greater gout and gusto. They are as mad as hornets because the prize slips them just as they are ready to grasp it."
Problem is, the part in between "interests" and "These are" is critical, and runs contrary to Adams' thesis.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on March 20 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is a history book for functional illiterates. Funny how there is nothing about tariffs in the Crittenden Compromise, the last ditch effort to keep the country from dividing. What a shock. Why not? Because secession wasn't about tariffs. Southern Senators could have rejected the Morrill Tariff in 1861, but they didn't. Why not? They had already walked out. Why did they walk out? Because a "black" Republican had been elected President of the United States.
Again, the Morrill tariff passed three months AFTER seven states had already left. They could have blocked it, but they left. The tariff of 1857, the existing tariff at the time, had bipartisan support. The delegation from South Carolina voted for it. It was the lowest tariff in two decades.
If you think don't think the root cause of secession was slavery and slavery extension, I implore you to go to your library and look through some old southern newspapers of the era -- like the Charleston Mercury. Or maybe just take Vice President of the Confederacy Alexander Stephen's word for it:
"The new constitution has put at rest, forever, all the agitating questions relation to our peculiar institution -- African slavery as it exists among us -- the proper status of the negro in our form of civilization. THIS WAS THE IMMEDIATE CAUSE OF THE LATE RUPTURE AND PRESENT REVOLUTION." - Alexander Stephens, March 1861.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
This book gives good coverage of the travesties to the original Constitution. The book pragmatically exposes the North's fascist bent, from the radical left wing socialistic policies of taxation without representation, to the establishment of a nationalist military-industrial complex. The book does little to discuss northern slaveowners (like Ulysses Grant), the New York Race Riot where dozens of blacks were brutally murdered, the rampant racism of the North, the creation of an income tax, the creation of central banking through the use of abolitionists, etc. I am glad my ancestors were on the right side, and am grateful that they killed off dozens of thugs and vandals to defend their homes, families, and constitution. It was not just their right, it was their duty. If you are from the South and are puzzled about the disparity between what is taught in government schools and your family history, journals and diaries, this book will set your mind at ease. If your family was with the 80% of southerners who did not keep slaves, rest assured that they probably fought for the very noble purpose that is defined in this book. This book lets the reader understand, in general, about the festering and rotting of socialism upon a nation and more importantly, about the character and willingness it takes to stand up to it. It helps the sons and daughters of the South to understand the sacrifice, whether in victory or defeat, that is necessary to let an oppressor know that there will be hell to pay for such economic oppression. The author makes an excellent point where he shows the british tax on tea perversely dwarfed by the Morrill Tarrif. How about the subsidization of railroads via government handouts off of the backs of southerners?Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on July 18 2003
Format: Hardcover
I think a quote from Alexander Stephens' infamous cornerstone address will clear up any concerns about the reasons for secession.
"The new constitution has put at rest, forever, all the agitating questions relating to our peculiar institution -- African slavery as it exists amongst us -- the proper status of the negro in our form of civilization. This was the immediate cause of the late rupture and present revolution. Jefferson in his forecast, had anticipated this, as the "rock upon which the old Union would split." He was right. What was conjecture with him, is now a realized fact. But whether he fully comprehended the great truth upon which that rock stood and stands, may be doubted. The prevailing ideas entertained by him and most of the leading statesmen at the time of the formation of the old constitution, were that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of nature; that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally, and politically. It was an evil they knew not well how to deal with, but the general opinion of the men of that day was that, somehow or other in the order of Providence, the institution would be evanescent and pass away. This idea, though not incorporated in the constitution, was the prevailing idea at that time. The constitution, it is true, secured every essential guarantee to the institution while it should last, and hence no argument can be justly urged against the constitutional guarantees thus secured, because of the common sentiment of the day. Those ideas, however, were fundamentally wrong. They rested upon the assumption of the equality of races. This was an error. It was a sandy foundation, and the government built upon it fell when the "storm came and the wind blew.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback