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When You Work for a Bully: Assessing Your Options and Taking Action [Paperback]

Susan Futterman


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Book Description

Aug. 28 2004
For employees who are tired of constant confrontation, this book provides instructions for leaving an abusive situation in the workplace in a dignified way and moving on in a manner that is financially practical. Employees learn the numerous exit strategies available to get out of the abusive work situation, along with the benefits and drawbacks of each. From the decision-making process that will determine an employee’s next steps to the information needed to implement this decision, this book provides the data and resources to make those difficult choices as well as the knowledge required to set them into action. Advice on everything from knowing how to identify a bully to utilizing self-defense tactics and budgeting finances enables bullied employees to take control of complicated and uncomfortable situations.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Croce Publishing Group, Llc (Aug. 28 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0971953880
  • ISBN-13: 978-0971953888
  • Product Dimensions: 21.7 x 14 x 1.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #837,452 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Inspired by her own experience with a workplace bully, Futterman (Self-Defense for Men and Women) describes in familiar detail the emotions, actions and toll on life that an overbearing boss can take. She explains how to spot the signs of bullying, distinguish between a bully and a negative manager, and understand how serious it is-"Of those targeted by bullies, 41 percent were diagnosed with depression and more than 80 percent reported effects that prevented them from being effective at work (severe anxiety, lost concentration, sleeplessness, etc.)." She provides suggestions for dealing with bullies, addresses cases in which legal action might be in order and offers realistic advice for preparing to leave a job, noting that "leaving your job without another one waiting is stressful...but if you don't take a deep breath, marshal your forces and do what it takes to move forward, you're likely to regret it later." The tone of the book is appropriate-neither overly sensitive nor dismissive. Anecdotes from victims of workplace bullying underscore the author's points, illustrate bullies' traits and create a framework of support for the reader.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Susan Futterman has worked as a writer and editor for Investor’s Business Daily and as a business reporter for the Omaha World-Herald, California Business Magazine, and the Hayward Daily Review. She is the author of Self-Defense for Men and Women and Using CompuServe to Make You Rich. She lives in San Francisco, California.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
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This book comes out of my own experience with a workplace bully-my former boss. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  15 reviews
43 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A "must read" for every employee and involved professionals Aug. 16 2004
By Thankful Reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I found this book very helpful - empowering, informative and compassionate. It is a comprehensive plan of action packed with ample practical advice, extensive listings of resources and bibliography. In her book, Susan Futterman points out and discusses multiple options and solutions (how to maintain healthcare coverage, how to plan and reallocate financial resources, how to apply for disability if need arises, how to pursue legal remedies, how to fight attempts of blacklisting etc) which can be easily overlooked by someone distressed by workplace bullying.

This book enables workers to remain in proactive control of their careers and lives, to overcome emotional, financial and professional damage caused by workplace bullying/mobbing and to successfully move on after such devastating experience. What a huge amount of time and effort it must've taken for the author to research all this information and to put it together. Thank you.

I wholeheartedly recommend this "anti-bullying guide" not only to those who already found themselves in a hostile workplace situation, but also to any employed individuals (workplace bullying remains widespread; often it's a matter of being in the wrong place at the wrong time - and it never hurts to be prepared) as well as to those in a position to assist people targeted by bullying - therapists, counselors, legal specialists, employment agents, arbitrators, HR professionals, and others supposed to handle such situations and to facilitate the process of "moving on" for their clients. Being "armed" with this information will make your help much more effective.
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When You Work for a Bully Oct. 8 2004
By Nancy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is an excellent book for helping an employee understand what bullying is and how to deal with it before it affects a persons health and well-being. Ms. Futterman's book outlines the options you have when confronted with a bully at work. I highly recommend it for anyone in the workplace who may be feeling undue stress brought on by bullying managers or co-workers.
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From self-defense to exit strategies March 17 2006
By D. Donovan, Editor/Sr. Reviewer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Employees who work for a bully face daily and constant confrontation with little recourse - but WHEN YOU WORK FOR A BULLY: ASSESSING YOUR OPTIONS AND TAKING ACTION offers such recourse, from exit strategies to leave an abusive situation to learning how to identify a bully and utilizing self-defense tactics to keep ego intact. From financial concerns to preserving job integrity and seeking government assistance, WHEN YOU WORK FOR A BULLY juxtaposes case history examples with practical tips. Very highly recommended: it provides specifics rather than theory.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A book about quitting - not about coping Jan. 7 2010
By Lisa Shea - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I can see why some people love this book. It talks about how awful bullies are how much they can destroy your life, and it goes into great detail about how to quit, how to manage your finances after you quit, how to pursue legal action to get revenge on the bully, and how to get a new job.

However, this book is supposed to be about "assessing your option" - indicating it might actually help you WORK with the bully. In reality, the author, Susan Futterman, pretty much tells you up fron that it is completely hopeless to work with a bully and exhorts you to sue them instead. Entire chapters are dedicated to your legal options. In fact in one section she talks about how most wise career coaches would tell you to leave the company with grace, since it is your own career and life that you are maintaining. She says this is balderdash, that it's much more rewarding to get emotional satisfaction for yourself and burn those bridges.

Reading the bio material, it appears that Susan was herself bullied by a boss, she parted ways with that boss, and the experience caused her to write the book. So one gets the sense that in her case it was futile to find a solution with the bully and now she wants to coach everyone else in the situation to go through that transition using what she learned about getting COBRA insurance, getting on food stamps, and so on. Yes, I appreciate that for people who take her specific path, this book is very helpful. But - again - what about the many people who are looking for tips to COPE and SURVIVE with a bully? She gives up on them very quickly.

So, let's start at the beginning. Susan does briefly cover how to differentiate between a regular manager and a bully. A regular manager will try to phrase criticism so it is at least reasonably constructive. You did well on the report, but need to focus more on catching typos. A bully will constantly criticize, and even the very rare compliments will have a criticism in them. Bullying isn't about one act. It's about a continual, constant stream of criticisms. You could look at one specific instance and think it wasn't that bad if it was a one time thing, but because it happens constantly with no let-up it becomes bullying.

If your boss has a legitimate concern - for example you agreed that your sales quota for March was $X and you made nowhere near $X - then your boss has a correct reason to bring this up and press you to do better. Bullying would be if you never set a quota, you followed his instructions and did everything he asked and he started yelling at you for not doing well enough. Some managers are simply clumsy. They have legitimate complaints with your work and simply do not express their frustration well. With those managers you can learn how to "manage your manager", gently guide them towards a more productive feedback cycle so you can indeed meet the goals. However, with a bully, you never have goals. You don't get useful feedback, you don't get any constructive direction on how to achieve what they want. You just get abuse, yelling, criticisms and demeaning comments.

Bullies usually don't see themselves as bullies! They think they are great, powerful managers. They think they are brutally honest and feel that's a good trait. They feel that they're incredibly thorough, and do not see it as micro-managing or nit-picking. They do not realize their reactions are completely lacking in productive value. They think their yelling should be enough to get the job done.

This information was all *wonderful* and I was incredibly psyched after reading all of this to get into the meat of the matter. After all this was only the first part of the book! We were exploring the nature of bullies, a bit about what made them tick, and how to make sure we weren't calling a "people-challenged" manager a bully just because they were on the gruff side. There was hope to turn the situation around.

Unfortunately, right there is where the helpful information for me ended. The book goes right into "prepare to leave immediately - and here is how". It was a real surprise to me. It is like getting a book on "how to work out things with your grumpy husband" and having the book say "OK this is why husbands can be grumpy. X, Y, Z. Here is what you do - get divorced! Get a great lawyer, sue the guy for all he's worth, and rant to your friends for years afterward about the waste of time he was."

I'm not too far off here. Susan pushes hard for everyone to leave their boss. Journal in detail every thing you do while you're leaving, because you might be able to sue him for millions. Only do what is required of you at the job. Be calm and professional, to bolster your legal case, and document every request and copy every request back to him. Put it all in your legal files. Have witnesses around for any interactions, and get them to sign legal documents.

Then she goes into all the "aftermath". She talks in great detail about finance issues, how to clean up your budget, how to use Canadian pharmacies to save cash? She goes in detail about how someone goes about quitting, and how to negotiate for a nice package on the way out. She talks about the ins and outs of job searching. And, of course, she has a very dense area on legal options and how to get back at your bully boss.

I can see if the book was titled "Bully Boss - How to Quit, Sue, and Seek Revenge". That would be the perfect title for this book. Again, she explicitly tells people that instead of leaving quietly, that it is far more satisfying to leave in a way that lets you exorcise your demons against your bully boss and get you the satisfaction you've craved. She says this even while acknowledging that career coaches would warn you this is the worst thing for your future career. She exhorts you to rant and rave to friends for months afterward, to cleanse your system. Every book I've read on healing focuses on filling yourself with calm, rewarding, encouraging thoughts - not with evil, revenge-fantasy harm-someone diatribes.

If you are working with a bully and are ALREADY thinking about quitting - and really need help landing on your feet - then I'd recommend this book. It does have a lot of detail about the steps you take in order to quit and make that transition. But if your issue is that you think your boss is a bully and want to get ideas for how to cope, this is NOT the book for you. Since that was - to me - what it was presenting itself to be, I would give this 3/5 stars.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars work is NOT life May 12 2007
By tech - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Many, maybe most people identify themselves by their profession or the company that they work for. Many times it is a happy, fulfilling part of their life, but if is isn't, there is a good chance someone at your workplace is making you miserable.

If that person is your boss, who constantly undermines your work to the point you question your very self, and when works becomes a source of stress, causing physical ailments, this book will help you decide the path you need to take.

Bullying is unfortunately very real in the workplace and, at least in the US, a legal (though unethical) way to manage employees. I strongly suggest this book to anyone who is physically ill at the thought of going to their place of employment every day.

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