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Where The Wild Things Are Paperback – Nov 9 1988


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Paperback, Nov 9 1988
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Where The Wild Things Are + Love You Forever + The Paper Bag Princess
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Programs and Genres; 1 edition (Nov. 9 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0064431789
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064431781
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 22.9 x 25.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 249 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (216 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #177 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

Where the Wild Things Are is one of those truly rare books that can be enjoyed equally by a child and a grown-up. If you disagree, then it's been too long since you've attended a wild rumpus. Max dons his wolf suit in pursuit of some mischief and gets sent to bed without supper. Fortuitously, a forest grows in his room, allowing his wild rampage to continue unimpaired. Sendak's color illustrations (perhaps his finest) are beautiful, and each turn of the page brings the discovery of a new wonder.

The wild things--with their mismatched parts and giant eyes--manage somehow to be scary-looking without ever really being scary; at times they're downright hilarious. Sendak's defiantly run-on sentences--one of his trademarks--lend the perfect touch of stream of consciousness to the tale, which floats between the land of dreams and a child's imagination.

This Sendak classic is more fun than you've ever had in a wolf suit, and it manages to reaffirm the notion that there's no place like home.

Review

"Each word has been carefully chosen and the simplicity of the language is quite deceptive." -- -- SLJ.

"The clearer reproductions of the original art are vibrant and luminous [in this edition]." -- -- H.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The night Max wore his wolf suit and made mischief of one kind and another his mother called him "WILD THING!" Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Brown on July 24 2006
Format: Paperback
I remember this book as the first that truly transported me into its pages. It is poetically written, easy for a child to follow, and sparks the imagination. I was near tears with excitement when I was able to read it to my children for the first time. I was seven again as I watched their eyes light up for a timeless story of a boy's unstoppable imagination, a "wild rumpus" with deferential monsters, and an undercurrent of a mother's love for her little wild thing. Well-illustrated, the pictures are fun, frightening, and fantastic. A must-read for your little wild things!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Tara K. George on Feb. 25 2006
Format: Paperback
My daughter has books spilling off her book shelf because she has so many. This is the one she chooses every night for our story time. She is just turning 3 and we have a lot of fun reading it together. I always leave the last word in every sentence for her to say because she knows the story by heart now. I fondly remember this book as a child and it's nice to see my daughter loving it as much as I did.
The illustrations are unique and the story is full of imagination! Love it! Need I say more?!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Betty L. Dravis on July 7 2006
Format: Paperback
I somehow missed this book when my children were little, but I've seen it recommended so often on Amazon.com that I finally decided to buy it ... 43 years after it was written!

I notice it's still among the best-sellers of children's books, so that gives me another clue of how great it is. Now, that's staying power!

To make a long story short, I finally had the joy of reading it and have passed it on to my grandchildren. It's a wonderful, imaginative story. I enjoyed Sendak's style; his streams of consciousness made for smooth reading. And I can tell my grandkids are enjoying it, too. Johnny's reading it now, and he has the broadest smile on his face! (Grandmother's note: His smile lights up the room, warming my heart and making me extra glad I finally broke down and purchased this book.)

Senak is a masterful writer who knows the child's mind and heart. The illustrations are magical.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S. Kipling on May 19 2006
Format: Paperback
My son is 2 and just loves this book. He recites portions of it over and over again. It really captures his imagination and will initate hours of talk about "monsters". An absolute hit in our house!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By David on Dec 14 2006
Format: Paperback
If you are a good parent you must get a copy of "Where The Wild Things Are". This is a story of a very bad boy's day of imaginative roll playing and final acceptance of his place in the real world. I love reading it to my children and watching as their little faces lit up in recognition of adventures they had endured during their own periods of bad behavior... Check it out and get it for your little "darlings".

Another MUST HAVE for your children is the series Cats are Rascals, by Nowiki. Very captivating and touching stories showing the world with cats eyes
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Format: Hardcover
I haven't a clue how one goes about reviewing the book that is perhaps the most beloved, respected, and widely enjoyed American picture book of the last 100 years. Maurice Sendak could never have imagined that his canny "Where the Wild Things Are" would not only capture the Caldecott Award of 1963, but go on to be hailed by critics, loved by librarians, and considered by parents to be one of the finest works of picture book art ever concocted. Is the book deserving of its praise? I suppose. But honestly, it is very difficult to read it today without getting caught up in its publicity and hype. On the whole, though, it is an enjoyable read and few can resist its charms.

We begin the book with two small vignettes of the naughty things Max does that get him sent to bed. Max is a boy outfitted in a wolf suit, and after being sent to his room he finds his boudoire changed completely into a wild forest. After hopping a nearby boat and traveling, "In and out of weeks and almost over a year to where the wild things are" he is in a land of monsters. Taming them by staring them down, the Wild Things make Max their king and celebrate his crowning. Max proclaims that a wild rumpus should start, and start it does. When it ends, however, Max decides that he needs to be near someone who loves him. He leaves his beloved Wild Things, sails back into his room, and goes down to dinner where, on a single white page, we are told, "it was still hot".

Simultaneously combining the wish to be a wild naughty creature uninhibited by love, or rules, or society and at the same time revealing the human need for comfort, the book is a success. In its illustrations, those wild crazy creatures with their too large eyes and sharp razor-like claws, it is a success.
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Format: Hardcover
There are quite a few reviews listed that claim that this book glorifies being a snot-nosed brat. While yes, Max is every parent's nightmare at the beginning, and yes, he gets whisked off to this fantasy land with monsters, being bad is not glorified at all. Once he's "Where the Wild Things are," he uses the tried-and-true parent move of having a stearn staring contest (my mom did this w/ me, so that's why I assume it's a common parent move) w/ the other "wilds" to prove that he's boss. Then, as King (parent?), he has to control the wilds, which proves to be too much for Max to handle. Instead of sticking with them, the wilds that "love" him, Max leaves so he can go back to the "someone that loves him very much." The point: After being put in the role of leader and "parent," he realizes that even though he's been a total Crap to his mom, she has always been there for him and has never left him, unlike how he left the wilds. Also, he had to deal first hand with beings that acted the same way he acted towards his mother. Instead of being able to just leave Max, she has to stay with him (well...she's his mom...she should stay w/ him), and he realizes in the end that he's acted unfairly to his mom and decides to clean up his act. At least that's what I saw in the story the first time I read it when I was 5, and that's what I continue to see today, 15 years later.
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