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White House Connection [Abridged, Audiobook] [Audio Cassette]

Jack Higgins
3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)

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Mass Market Paperback CDN $9.49  
MP3 CD, Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged CDN $13.13  
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Book Description

Sept. 18 2003
Best of the Best. Jack Higgins reunites the team from "The President's Daughter" to go after a most curious assassin--but one with the power to bring down nations.

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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

The Irish peace process is at risk because of the actions of a heartbroken mother in Higgins's 29th thriller. American-born and married to a British lord, 60-ish Lady Helen Lang, the "nicest person you'll ever meet," has taken it upon herself to avenge the brutal death of her son, Peter, at the hands of the Sons of Erin, a fringe Irish-nationalist group led by a psychotic Vietnam vet and with operatives in Dublin, London and the U.S. Other members include gangster Tim Pat Ryan, IRA terrorist Jack Barry, U.S. Senator Michael Cohan and a mysterious member known only as the Connection, who is revealed to be a mole in the White House. With nothing more than an old government file, a modified computer and a .25 revolver, Lady Helen makes short work of most of these villains, managing at one point to knock off three of them in four paragraphs. Naturally, this wholesale violence attracts the attention of Higgins regulars Brigadier Charles Ferguson and Sean Dillon, who try to protect Senator Cohan during his upcoming visit to London. It's not giving away any surprises to reveal that eventually the bad guys get theirs, but there are precious few surprises here, and a bloodless, cartoonish quality to everything from the dialogue to the killings. Higgins's attempt at characterizations are unpersuasive at bestAto prove that she's really a decent sort, Lady Helen passes up a chance to kill Senator Cohan in favor of shooting a couple of muggersAand as usual, Sean Dillon's prowess as a gunman includes the ability to outshoot men who have already drawn a gun on him. As for the style, everything is fast, flat and featureless, like driving a car on cruise control in Kansas. Higgins's fans may be pleased, but other readers will probably want a more exciting ride. BOMC main selection.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Higgins's novel of British and American undercover security forces collaborating to stop Irish terrorists, identify a killer, and locate a mole in the White House is stronger on violence than suspense, yet it comes across well as an audiobook. When not killing people, the characters are swilling whisky, chain-smoking, and pondering past and future atrocities while nominally trying to bring peace to Northern Ireland. Reader Dick Hill has fun with character voices and gives the listener a feast of sound: the musical Irish accent of reformed terrorist Sean Dillon; the deep-pitched, thick, brutal voice of professional terrorist Jack Barry; the crisp, clean accent of hero Blake Johnson; the slightly Caribbean lilt of a Harlem cop; and the Boston clip of aristocratic and determined Lady Helen. Recommended for popular collections.AJuleigh Muirhead Clark, John D. Rockefeller Jr. Lib., Williamsburg, VA
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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BORN IN BOSTON in 1933 to one of Boston's wealthiest families, Helen Darcy's mother had died giving birth to her, and she was raised as an only child. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars It Pains Me... March 28 2004
By T. King
Format:Mass Market Paperback
...to rate this book so low. I am a long time fan of Jack Higgins having enjoyed his books since I was a teen. I don't know if the writing has deteriorated or maybe my tastes have matured, but I could not finish this book. The plot was stale, the dialouge staged and it just failed to generate any suspense at all. Maybe it's time for the Sean Dillon series to end, I know there are several more after this. Whatever happened to the Martin Brosnan character? He and Dillon have an old score to settle. Now that would make an interesting book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars another great read July 21 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I debated between four or five stars and gave it five stars because I enjoyed it from the beginning to the end. It piqued my interest at the first with the 60 year old hit woman and kept it all the way through the book. She is killing the Sons of Erin and the British and American special intelligence are trying to find out who is doing it and why. They are also looking for the connection at the White House who has been giving out secret information to the IRA group. I read this book in one day. I highly recommend it.
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Format:Mass Market Paperback
I've read few Jack Higgins books, and this was my first. That said, I didn't know any of the recurring characters or their stories, yet it didn't make a difference. The story makes perfect sense without foreknowledge of the characters, and this was still a great book.
In the opening pages, an assassin waits patiently for a Senator to arrive at his residence. Against the backdrop of a light rain, two men pull a woman into an alley with the intent to rape her. The assassin comes to her aid, and we find that the assassin is an old woman, a kindly old grandmother! From this moment on, my interest was peaked. I had to find out who this woman was, how she entered her profession, etc. I was not disappointed. "The White House Connection" is a spy thriller true to its purpose, perfect for a rainy day or an extended plane ride. If you like Jack Higgins, you'll definitely love this novel. And if you've never read his work, this is a great starting point. For a quick reality escape, read this book!
Britt Gillette
...
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1.0 out of 5 stars smoker May 19 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The plot of this book is simplistic: a mother wants revenge for her son, and gets it. Other than that, nothing much happens. The whole story is predictable. I don't think I will spoil anybody's surprise by disclosing that the mother -- loved by all -- dies when revenge is complete and has a lovely funeral.
This is a book peopled by ... caricatures, such as the troubled soul with a difficult past, and bizarre habits only to be hinted at. Imagine! one character has a Gurkha batboy named Kim. I bet the author stayed up all night trying to think that one up.
You can get cancer just by reading this book, with all the smokers in it. If you cut out every time somebody lights up, or asks for a cigarette, you would reduce the book's volume by a good 10 per cent.
The dividers tell you that this section takes place in New York or London, or something. Beyond that, and a few street names, the book does not produce any sense of place. It doesn't help that the "Americans" sound British. Read James Lee Burke and you're squarely in rural Louisiana; Ian Rankin places the reader right in Scotland. I have never visited either place, but feel I know them, just from the authors' skill. Jack Higgins' writing makes you feel you are sitting in a chair at home, wondering, isn't New York any different from London?
It rains a lot in this book. Characters slip through walls and out windows. They like to do nothing so well as to tell about battles they have fought, and they do so almost every time they speak. Two characters (Hedley and the Secret Service agent) even review their battle resumes as they slug it out: My war was bigger than your war! Fortunately, the Gurkha orderly doesn't get a speaking part. Otherwise, he too would be telling us about battles he fought: "Here's your tea, sir.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Decent light reading Dec 29 2001
By W. Fish
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Lady Helen, a geriatric British aristocrat, gains revenge on people involved in the killing of her son. While not very believable, and not one of Higgin's better works, it's a quick and mostly enjoyable read with familiar characters. The two major annoyances throughout the book were:
1. EVERY character talks about the joys of smoking. It appeared to be a paid advertisement for Marlboros and the emphasis he placed on the dialogue related to smoking detracts from the story.
2. EVERY American character uses British phrases and discusses their love of things British from meat pies to Harrods.
If a friend gives you the book and there isn't anything better to read, it will pass the time.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Come on! Oct. 10 2001
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Super-granny killing gangsters, never getting killed herself.
Please
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5.0 out of 5 stars The fantasy is great! Sept. 18 2001
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Some of you guys are tough! It's Jack Higgins, for heaven's sake. When I want a quick, exciting read, I turn to him. And he usually delivers. This one is totally 'out there', but so entertaining you can't put it down. Just because the shooter is a 60ish y.o. woman with money and connections (good ones) you have to make believe this could really happen. Her son is killed and thrown into a cement mixer and she goes after the Sons of Erin who did him in. Aiding her is her loyal chauffeur and friend, Hedley. This guy is one mean dude; she couldnt get along without him. Sean Dillon and crew are there to add to the mix. Great, good fun. Stop looking for the Book of Life. This was one good time!
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Most recent customer reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars Please disconnect me from this nonsense
Excuse me, with all the clues out there, why did it take these masterminds so long to figure out who was knocking off all the Sons of Erin? Read more
Published on June 2 2001 by Paul Skinner
5.0 out of 5 stars This was so fantastic!
His books just keep coming! Great reading by me and great writing by him! I am up to dATE and can't wait to see what comes my way next! I wish Higgins has a web site! ... Read more
Published on May 21 2001 by Daniel R. Bills
1.0 out of 5 stars Is it time for Higgins to hang it up?
I have been reading Higgins off and on since "The Eagle Has Landed" was new, but not recently. Read more
Published on March 5 2001 by "jfarro"
3.0 out of 5 stars An OK read...
..but not the best. I have difficulties with superheroes who are capable of leaping tall buildings with a single bound, speaking 20 languages fluently and invariably surface from... Read more
Published on Feb. 27 2001
4.0 out of 5 stars Quick Read but Higgins Has Done Better
In The White House Connection, Jack Higgins, the prolific thriller writer has again reprised former IRA terrorist Sean Dillon, Brigadier Charles Ferguson,Hannah Bernstein and Blake... Read more
Published on Feb. 17 2001 by P. Connors
5.0 out of 5 stars The dependable modern-day bard does it again
As always, Jack Higgins is a quick and excellent read. This one is as pleasing as ever. A novel with either Hannah Bernstein or Charles Ferguson as the main character would also... Read more
Published on Jan. 24 2001 by Hamilton Jackson Truman
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