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White Light/White Heat Import


Price: CDN$ 14.71 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
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33 new from CDN$ 3.53 9 used from CDN$ 7.73 1 collectible from CDN$ 19.09

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White Light/White Heat + Velvet Underground + And Nico
Price For All Three: CDN$ 33.14

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  • Velvet Underground CDN$ 13.43

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 7 1996)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Polydor - Universal Special Imports
  • ASIN: B000002G7E
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (124 customer reviews)

1. White Light/White Heat
2. The Gift
3. Lady Godiva's Operation
4. Here She Comes Now
5. I Heard Her Call My Name
6. Sister Ray


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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sean Corrigan on July 17 2004
Format: Audio CD
I really don't know what to say. For me, this was it. The moment I turned it on, everything I'd ever known about conventional modern pop music was tossed out the window (defenestrated, if you will). But the question still remains: Of the two relevant VU albums (the ones with Cale), which is better?
I've argued with my friends and even myself and have concluded that the Velvets' fusion of avant-garde and rock n' roll is at its peak on White Light/White Heat, and it's dark energy may never be matched.
The distorted guitars and of "Run, Run, Run" have been turned up louder and the band rocks out with the messiness of "European Son" while the subject matter of sex, drugs and transexuals is preached over the music. Lou Reed never played guitar like this again, almost as if Cale's mind took over his hands. Some of his guitar solos are almost comparable to free jazz (I've read that other places, too), specifically on "I Heard Her Call My Name."
"The Gift" is pure sexual tension, and Cale's voice is perfect for reading the story over the band's jam. "Lady Godiva's Operation" utilizes vocals in imaginative ways.
"Here She Comes Now" is a display of what the third album could have potentially sounded like if Cale had remained with the group: much better than anything with Yule.
"Sister Ray" is where all of the tensions between Reed and Cale completely take over. For 17 and a half minutes, the two compete on guitar and organ ("There is no bass") and the result makes the Velvets seem like a primitive (thanks Moe Tucker) jam band for transvestite-junkies. None of the bootlegs of this song with Yule ever sounded anywhere near as good.
In conclusion, WL/WH sparked something in me, and I fell in love with its tense, violent sexual energy instantly. If you've ever thought that Led Zeppelin was boring, or that the Rolling Stones weren't the coolest band in the world, then I highly recommend White Light/White Heat.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
....No one touches it,no one comes near it.
After reading the Velvet Underground History,in which there is a description of how this album was made,and now hearing the result,I can understand why Lou said the above...
I was kinda led to believe that at the 15 min.mark,Sister Ray became a
Free for all,but Moe Tucker holds it together on the drums....amazing!!!
Furthermore the Remastering done on this is superb.I have an 1996
Release and already you can hear the results of the facelift to this gem.
This crew was way aheada their time.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on March 25 2007
Format: Audio CD
Distortion. Either you love it or you hate it, and that will determine whether you love or hate the Velvet Underground's "White Light/White Heat," which was the final album with John Cale on it. It's strange, raw and eerie, and except for the too-long finale, a fairly good collection.

It kicks off with distorted pop song "White Light/White Heat," and gets followed by equally distorted series of offbeat songs, such as the sex-change operation ballad "Lady Godiva's Operation," the relatively ethereal "Here She Comes Now," and the twisted, squealing riffs of "I Heard Her Call My Name."

"The Gift" is perhaps the most offbeat of all the tracks here: A spoken story-song, recited matter-of-factly in John Cale's Welsh accent. It's about a jealous husband who, in doubt about his wife's fidelity, mails himself to her house. Sounds ordinary enough, except that there is a twist to the finale, both funny and macabre.

This is one of the darker albums that the Velvet Underground did, as well as the last one that was so experimental. The finale is almost twenty minutes of screeching, explosive guitar riffs, and the story-song is definitely odd. But once you get into the swing of it, it's remarkably moving.

The fuzz and wildness of "White Light/White Heat" is definitely offputting at first -- the melodies are buried under a perpetual buzz of sound. That lo-fi flavor won't be to everyone's taste, but those who like their music rough, raw and ragged will probably like the murky riffs and muffled drumming, rising out of a thick mass of fuzz.

For those who don'ty like distortion, it might be a comfort to just focus on the offbeat lyrics -- they can be vulgar, nasty, enchanting, or they can be brimful of black comedy. At least, they are never boring.
Read more ›
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Feb. 24 2007
Format: Audio CD
Distortion. Either you love it or you hate it, and that will determine whether you love or hate the Velvet Underground's "White Light/White Heat," which was the final album with John Cale on it. It's strange, raw and eerie, and except for the too-long finale, a fairly good collection.

It kicks off with distorted pop song "White Light/White Heat," and gets followed by equally distorted series of offbeat songs, such as the sex-change operation ballad "Lady Godiva's Operation," the relatively ethereal "Here She Comes Now," and the twisted, squealing riffs of "I Heard Her Call My Name."

"The Gift" is perhaps the most offbeat of all the tracks here: A spoken story-song, recited matter-of-factly in John Cale's Welsh accent. It's about a jealous husband who, in doubt about his wife's fidelity, mails himself to her house. Sounds ordinary enough, except that there is a twist to the finale, both funny and macabre.

This is one of the darker albums that the Velvet Underground did, as well as the last one that was so experimental. The finale is almost twenty minutes of screeching, explosive guitar riffs, and the story-song is definitely odd. But once you get into the swing of it, it's remarkably moving.

The fuzz and wildness of "White Light/White Heat" is definitely offputting at first -- the melodies are buried under a perpetual buzz of sound. That lo-fi flavor won't be to everyone's taste, but those who like their music rough, raw and ragged will probably like the murky riffs and muffled drumming, rising out of a thick mass of fuzz.

For those who don'ty like distortion, it might be a comfort to just focus on the offbeat lyrics -- they can be vulgar, nasty, enchanting, or they can be brimful of black comedy. At least, they are never boring.
Read more ›
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