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Who Killed the Grand Banks: The Untold Story Behind the Decimation of One of the World's Greatest Natural Resources Hardcover – Apr 14 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; Canadian First edition (April 14 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470153873
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470153871
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 16 x 22.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 363 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #591,041 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Peter J. Hill on May 9 2008
Format: Hardcover
Scary to read how many warnings the governments got about the cod collapse.
Yet they went ahead and allowed fishing until it all fell apart.
There is a section on how we are playing the same game here on the west coast with salmon.
We blame every other nation until there are no fish left.

The book reads like a mystery novel, as no one has ever found out what really caused the loss of this once great resource.
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By Brian Griffith TOP 500 REVIEWER on Nov. 17 2013
Format: Hardcover
Rose notes the walls of silence that commonly greet him in Newfoundland's coffee shops, bars, or offices. The resentment of prying outsiders, government officials and voracious foreign fishing fleets is understandable. It must have been a tough book to research. But as our investigator demonstrates quite obviously, it was the Canadian trawler fleet that actually did the damage. After expanding it's offshore territory to 200 miles and claiming the bulk of the Grand Banks for Canadians only in 1977, the government-subsidized industry expanded it's fleet dramatically. The upgraded local fleet then proceeded to bulldoze the seabed and vacuum the fish stocks till the environmental collapse of 1992.

This book spirals about, giving detailed reports on the politicized corruption of government ministries, the parallel issues with the West Coast salmon fishery, the murky history of Newfoundland's Beothuk natives, and the new prospects of an oil and gas bonanza as the next big thing. Readers may feel the book jumps from topic to topic, though these things are more or less related. Sometimes the presentation is repetitious. But much of it is clear and compelling. There is some good reflection on options for the future, but not so much research in that direction. The book does it's main service in highlighting the destruction caused by seabed trawling, which levels the ocean floor like a clear-cut, devastating the food chain at its base. Hopefully rising awareness of that issue will lead to growing no-trawl zones.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If anyone is interested in a serious, researched read about the Grand Banks fishery....then don't bother with this book!
The writing is all over the place, is repetitive and reads like it was written by someone who has an axe to grind; someone who flew into Newfoundland for a few weeks, talked to a few people, became an expert, then left and wrote a book.
The title is "Who Killed the Grand Banks" but goes off into tangents with full chapters devoted to things like the salmon fishery in BC, and the Beothuk Indians in Newfoundland; both interesting subjects to be sure but slightly off topic. The author could also have at least attempted to put the state of the northern cod stocks in a bit of global fisheries perspective.
This book just comes off as a disjointed rant.....learn from my mistake, avoid it.
If you want to understand the Grand Bank fishery, including a global fisheries perspective, then go to Charles Clover's book "The End of the Line", a book I would recommend.
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Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Well, it's the trawling Nov. 17 2013
By Brian Griffith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Rose notes the walls of silence that commonly greet him in Newfoundland's coffee shops, bars, or offices. The resentment of prying outsiders, government officials and voracious foreign fishing fleets is understandable. It must have been a tough book to research. But as our investigator demonstrates quite obviously, it was the Canadian trawler fleet that actually did the damage. After expanding it's offshore territory to 200 miles and claiming the bulk of the Grand Banks for Canadians only in 1977, the government-subsidized industry expanded it's fleet dramatically. The upgraded local fleet then proceeded to bulldoze the seabed and vacuum the fish stocks till the environmental collapse of 1992.

This book spirals about, giving detailed reports on the politicized corruption of government ministries, the parallel issues with the West Coast salmon fishery, the murky history of Newfoundland's Beothuk natives, and the new prospects of an oil and gas bonanza as the next big thing. Readers may feel the book jumps from topic to topic, though these things are more or less related. Sometimes the presentation is repetitious. But much of it is clear and compelling. There is some good reflection on options for the future, but not so much research in that direction. The book does it's main service in highlighting the destruction caused by seabed trawling, which levels the ocean floor like a clear-cut, devastating the food chain at its base. Hopefully rising awareness of that issue will lead to growing no-trawl zones.

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