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New Whole Foods Encyclopedia Paperback – Jul 5 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Arkana; 1 edition (July 5 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140250328
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140250329
  • Product Dimensions: 18.9 x 2.6 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 658 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #554,086 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From Amazon

If you eat natural foods, or want to learn more about them, reading The New Whole Foods Encyclopedia will be a treat. The book is an invitation to learn the lore, health properties, and use of more than a thousand familiar and unusual foods and herbs. Each entry consists of a description, a little history or legend, the health benefits, and how to buy (or find) and use it. Author Rebecca Wood clearly delights in her subject--her writing is warm, like love letters to these intriguing foods. "I don't know what I love most about asafetida--its knock-your-socks-off sulfurous aroma ... or ... its pungent but pleasant and satisfying flavor," she writes of the herb also known as devil's dung. "I also love the way the word rolls off my tongue." Not all the entries are complimentary, though--Wood tried to like banana squash, but ended up feeding it to her chickens. Dotting the food entries are sidebars of recipes, preparation suggestions, and weird information that doesn't fit anywhere else: how horses get sunburned, why young wives fed their elderly husbands celery in the 1600s, tips for not crying over onions, and how to harvest natural chewing gum, for example. You may start by looking up a particular food, but you'll linger, reading just for the pleasure of it. --Joan Price

From Library Journal

In this update of a book originally published in 1983, Wood, author of the award-winning The Splendid Grain (LJ 2/15/97), provides an alphabetical listing of more than 1000 whole foods: grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, seaweeds, fungi, sweeteners, fats, oils, herbs, and spices. Entries include historical information, health benefits, uses, and buying guidelines. Sidebars studded throughout the text contain interesting anecdotes, recipes, and even the occasional poem. Wood includes a helpful section on how to store whole foods and a list of mail-order sources. She derives her information about the healing properties of foods from a combination of Western nutrition, traditional Chinese medicine, and Indian Ayurvedic medicine. Although some readers may be skeptical of Wood's claims for health benefits that have not been clinically proven, the book is filled with practical information that would be useful to anyone wanting to further their food horizons. Recommended for public and academic libraries.AJane La Plante, Gordon B. Olson Lib., Minot State Univ., ND
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Brenda B. Trace on Nov. 14 2002
Format: Paperback
Well, Ok not quite but almost! A few months ago my teenage daugher and I were diagnosed with numerous food allergies and told to follow a rotation diet. A life long vegetarian, it was an almost overwhelming to be told I could no longer eat soy, eggs, pinto beans, kidney beans, avocados, etc. And my daughter is not allowed any legumes as well (nor sugar either).
Clearly the protein was going to be a challenge (we really dislike flesh foods of any kind) but then I read the guidelines for the rotation diet itself and quickly discovered the extreme limits of my food knowledge! Sure I had heard of (but never cooked) quinoa and flax but amaranth and yautia? Not. And even if I could find where to purchase these items, how would I prepare them?
Both our weight and our attitude dropped signficantly in the first few weeks. Then we "modified" the guidelines and found ourselves physically sick again. Luckily for us, my husband purchased this book on a trip to Dallas. While I was skeptical about it's holding my interest as an actual "read through", I found it quite engrossing from almost the first page.
Not only do I now know what to do with the foods on a rotation diet list (knowing that yautia is similar to potatoes means I can now make a favorite soup that otherwise I would have passed over) but because the index is brilliantly organized I can easily look up say "warming foods" and adjust my internal thermostat rather than the whole house which made my husband doubly glad he had bought it! The same for high BP, colds, cancer, you name it.
And I can relax about the protein issue as well knowing which foods on "our list" are highest in protein instead of just choosing those foods with which I might have previously been most familiar.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Sept. 13 1999
Format: Paperback
I just love Wood's new book-I always get so much out of anything she writes...I couldn't ask for a better treat than to have such a goldmine of information all neatly organized and easy to reference as with The New Whole Foods Encyclopedia. I love the little boxes with various stories, and recipes,etc, that she included. These really fill the book out, making it such an enjoyable read...a new treasure with every page turned. In the past I have used Paul Pitchford's 'Healing with Whole Foods,' (also great) in much the same way I do this new book--referencing it everyday with every meal, but find Rebecca's book to be so wonderfully concise, and more easily referenced. Anyone looking to expand their horizons, and cultivate genuine awareness about their lifestyle/ eating habits should own this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By carla fullwood on Feb. 8 2002
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book for learning more about produce and other whole foods. She even includes some not so healthy foods and justifies her reasoning for them to be advised against. The book has useful information on how to find, select, store, and prepare food items and how they can impact the body. She includes Ayurveda and Oriental nutritional comments for most foods. Also, in the begining she has a short section on the basics to one of the best ways of eating up to date.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Fredd on July 26 2001
Format: Paperback
An excellent reference for those who enjoy cooking a lot at home. Though not a cookbook, it's very valuable if you're just starting to learn to cook for yourself, or for moderately experienced home chefs who want to branch out into unfamiliar territory. I've learned a great deal about storage and handling of foods I was afraid to buy before reading this book. Also, I particularly like the details regarding the nutritional benefits of every food item. For those who want learn the nutritional benefits of foods beyond garlic and olive oil, this book is for you as well.
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By A Customer on Nov. 8 1999
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent reference for any cook who wants to know more about whole foods, including grains, vegetables, fruits, etc. Rebecca is a very kind, warm person, and her personality shines through in this book.
The contents include both Western scientific knowledge about the proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals contained in foods, as well as their properties from an Eastern perspective, including Ayurvedic and Chinese Traditional Medicince. Rebecca draws from all of these traditions to present the wonders of whole foods. You may buy it as a reference but I guarantee you will browse just for the pleasure of it!
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