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Whose Criminal Justice?: State or Community? Paperback – Feb 21 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 290 pages
  • Publisher: Waterside Press (Feb. 21 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 190438062X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904380627
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 15.4 x 23 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 458 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
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By Phillip Taylor on April 26 2011
Format: Paperback
Length: 2:25 Mins
FOR THE 'BIG SOCIETY'!

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

In 300 pages, which must be a record for a serious statement of the problem which is criminal justice today, the 4 editors, Katherine Doolin, John Child, John Raine and Anthony Beech, have produced a highly readable statement on where we might be going with the criminal justice process in the next decade after years of legislative change.

There are 18 contributors to 'Whose Criminal justice?' and they have come together under the newly founded Birmingham Criminal and Community Justice Group (BCCJ Group) covering a range of areas including law, criminology, forensic psychology, social work and public management.

The overarching theme throughout the work is the balance between the role of central government in creating and shaping the regulatory framework of criminal justice, and the potential for communities at local level to become more involved and to exercise more responsibility for themselves in responding to crime and anti-social behaviour in their midst. And all this now under a new Coalition Government after years of single party political control of government, and the relative failures of many implemented measures.

The twin dynamics are examined in detail in the two main sections of the book. In Part I (The Regulatory State) through a series of case-studies, the authors examine how the central state has sought to address the risks and problems associated with crime and anti-social behaviour in modern times.

The authors consider the new context for law and order which has arisen and question how and why new sanctions were put in place to regulate particular kinds of behaviour.
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Amazon.com: 1 review
A new agenda... March 3 2011
By Phillip Taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
FOR THE `BIG SOCIETY'!

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

In 300 pages, which must be a record for a serious statement of the problem which is criminal justice today, the 4 editors, Katherine Doolin, John Child, John Raine and Anthony Beech, have produced a highly readable statement on where we might be going with the criminal justice process in the next decade after years of legislative change.

There are 18 contributors to "Whose Criminal justice?" and they have come together under the newly founded Birmingham Criminal and Community Justice Group (BCCJ Group) covering a range of areas including law, criminology, forensic psychology, social work and public management.

The overarching theme throughout the work is the balance between the role of central government in creating and shaping the regulatory framework of criminal justice, and the potential for communities at local level to become more involved and to exercise more responsibility for themselves in responding to crime and anti-social behaviour in their midst. And all this now under a new Coalition Government after years of single party political control of government, and the relative failures of many implemented measures.

The twin dynamics are examined in detail in the two main sections of the book. In Part I (The Regulatory State) through a series of case-studies, the authors examine how the central state has sought to address the risks and problems associated with crime and anti-social behaviour in modern times.

The authors consider the new context for law and order which has arisen and question how and why new sanctions were put in place to regulate particular kinds of behaviour. They also highlight some of the unintended consequences, notably the "criminalization" of more people, and the reality of the sanctions themselves as criminal justice is reviewed by the coalition.

In Part II (Empowered Communities as Stakeholders in Criminal Justice) - from chapter eight onwards- the book explores the potential for local communities to play a greater role in addressing the problems of crime and anti-social behaviour in their own neighbourhoods, which will probably be linked in to the developing concept of the `Big Society'.

In the second section of the book, the authors also consider the prospects for crime reduction through a more 'localist' approach in which citizens and communities play a more active part in a 'Big Society' which David Cameron has now launched. We welcome this book, primarily of great use to applied criminologists and all those interested in the criminal justice process generally because it provides a timely and topical stock-taking of the key issues and challenges.

Through an exploration of the relative strengths and limitations of 'centrist' and 'localist' approaches to tackling crime and anti-social behaviour, this title from Waterside Press offers a prescription of principles and priorities for a way forward for the next decade and it will be of great interest to see what actually happens as the second decade of the century unfolds. Yes, it is another useful work for a wide readership from Waterside as the new agenda is being set at the present time.

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