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Wicked Witch Murder Paperback – Aug 24 2010


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--This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.



Product Details

  • Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Kensington (Aug. 24 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0758259980
  • ISBN-13: 978-0758259981
  • Product Dimensions: 14.4 x 2.3 x 21.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 318 g
  • Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,233,966 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This Lucy Stone mystery was a big let down. The quality of the writing is no where near that of her early novels!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 65 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Fun read, but...(mild spoiler) Feb. 16 2011
By etacb - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I enjoy the Lucy Stone series, and I thought this book was a fun read, but the ending left me guffawing a little. Only because I found it hard to believe that Lucy would find herself in the situation that led to the story's climax, without apparently having any clue what was going on. As in, "La la la, oops, forgot to fill my gas tank, oh hey, look where I am! Look who's here! Look what they have handy! Nothing suspicious there!" Also, there were several questions that, to me, were not answered - obviously not the big question of whodunnit, but smaller ones, like: Why were those dudes chasing her in the woods? Who painted the pentagrams? What was the deal with the bear? Lastly, was I the only person who thought Lucy was maybe being a tad TOO open-minded in dealing with the Wicca folks, especially given the fact that an unsolved murder had been committed in their town? As a Mom, I don't think I'd open my home to a virtual stranger and let her hang out with my kids while I wasn't there, especially given the fact that said stranger was a potential suspect in the murder. Just sayin'.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Disappointing April 17 2011
By Cuileogcailin banaltra - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I usually love the series, but this one pushed me over the edge and I had a hard time finishing it. Like "Mom of Three" I couldn't believe that Lucy would bring a total stranger into her home. Some of the incidents in the book were so implausible, it left way too many unanswered questions, and there were times when I just wanted to slap Lucy along side the head and tell her to quit being so stupid! It seemed like she had no common sense in this book and that she really didn't care about the safety of herself or her family. It almost seemed to me like the author in her attempt to be open-minded/tolerant just pushed the limits of believable. Honestly, I had a hard time digging up my old enthusiasm for the character, and I just wanted her to go away. She was particularly clueless or just plain stupid at the end of the book. I like smart characters with common sense and she was not that in this book. Hopefully her next one will be better...
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
What a disappointment Jan. 25 2012
By R. A. Hoerst - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I have loved this series from the first book, but this one was a waste of my time. I didn't believe the premise from the outset and as someone else observed, Lucy seemed a totally different character, from a strong-willed working mother of four to a dithering believer in witchcraft. I don't think I'll even bother with the next book; I will get it from the library instead of wasting my money.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Parts of this book were phoned in Oct. 16 2011
By Reader from Grand Rapids - Published on Amazon.com
I have always enjoyed the Lucy Stone series, but this one really could have used some more thought and better editing. Lucy seems to have completely lost her spine in this book. She used to be fairly plucky, but in this book, she's a total doormat.

She doesn't want her girls consorting with the local witch, so what does she do? Lets the witch stay with her, and leaves her girls alone under her care! Yes, like that's going to keep them disinterested in witchcraft...Every time someone asks her to do a favor in this book,she knows she shouldn't do it, but she says yes anyway. And the "favor" that puts her in peril at the climax is simply unbelievable--anyone with half a brain would have said no immediately.

There are other problems with the series at this point as well. At one point, Lucy demands of her girls, "Aren't you feminists?" How on earth could they be? We've watched Lucy do her nearly-full-time job AND handle all of the household work, yardwork, gardening, and kowtow to her jerk of a husband as he complains about the dinners she cooks, shows no interest in her work, and treats her with an almost arrogant contempt. (He's so awful that at one point, I thought Meier was setting us up for a Bill-as-abusive-husband-ends-up-dead book). Lucy is hardly a model of feminism, and she forces her daughters into traditional homemaking roles as well, so how could they be feminists?

Editorial mistakes abound. Lucy asks the witch, Diana, if she's leaving town because she's afraid of "Ike Stonington." Hmm. There's a character named Ike Stoughton, but no Stonington. There's some confusion in places about exactly what time of year it is; in one part, Lucy has just told us it's the middle of August, and a few pages later, someone says, "Summer's just started." There are unexplained plot lines, as other reviewers have noticed, the mysterious bear being one of them.

These books used to be written and edited with much more care. This one has a lot of promise, but falls down on several levels. It's OK, but not more than OK.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Wicked Witch Murder by Leslie Meier Nov. 7 2013
By Christina T. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Synopsis: With planning the town's annual Halloween Party, the drought wreaking havoc on her garden, and her brood of four children, Lucy Stone's got her hands full this fall- As the air turns crisp and the trees blaze red and gold in the tiny town of Tinker's Cove, Maine, a newcomer arrives who seems to suit the Halloween season. Diana Ravenscroft has just opened Solstice, a charming little shop featuring candles, crystals, jewelry, and psychic readings. But after an unnervingly accurate reading by Diana, Lucy starts to get more than a little spooked- Then there's the dead body Lucy finds, way up on one of the old logging roads behind her house. The deceased is identified as Malcolm Malebranche, a seemingly harmless magician who worked at children's birthday parties. When it turns out that Diana knew the murder victim, Ike Stoughton, a prominent local businessman, starts a campaign against Diana, blaming -the witch- for everything from the unseasonal dry spell to his wife's illness and his pumpkins- lack of plumpness. But Lucy's not so sure that Ike himself is innocent. Still, as the town Halloween party approaches, Lucy's more concerned about the costume competition, pin-the-nose-on-the-pumpkin, and baking three dozen orange cupcakes and Beastly Bug cookies. But as the October moon rises, a killer plans a lethal celebration of his own-and Lucy's the guest of honor-

My Thoughts: I've been taking a sabbatical from mysteries for a while now and, in the past, I've loved the cozy sub-genre to pieces, including the Lucy Stone series. Before my time away of all that is murderous, I must have read 8...maybe 9 of the previous Lucy Stone books. I truly enjoyed them. So, what happened? Did I get punk'd by the Suck Fairy? Did this series really suck all along and I never realized it or was this just a horrible book? At this point I'm just not sure....

What Worked: Um...I got nothing. Well, I kind of liked the dog and maybe the couple cats the appeared through out the book. Other than that...yep. Nothing

What Didn't Work: First off the synopsis above was on the inner flap of the dust jacket. Meaning the publishing company thought this was a very good description of the contents. Not so much. For one thing this book starts in April (minus the prologue that is time line ambiguous). What? I thought Lucy was overly concerned about the Halloween festivities. Well, she was but not until the last couple of chapters in the book. This book is not about Halloween at all but the persecution of the Wicca religion and those who practice it.

The main character, Lucy Stone, is not charming whatsoever. She flip flops between sticking up for Diana, who is a witch and a practicing Wiccan and making horribly insultive and prejudistic comments like...

Lucy: "Samhain?"
Diana: "It's our new year, but you know it as Halloween."
Lucy: "Oh," said Lucy. "I suppose you'll all be riding around on broomsticks."

I suppose that if Lucy was known for her wry and sarcastic sense of humor or Meier had included some indicators to suggest she were kidding (ie: Lucy said jokingly) this might not have rubbed me the wrong way but as it's written this statement is an insult to Wicca.

The entire portrayal of the Wicca religion actually rubbed me the wrong way. I am no expert on Wicca but do know a little. The book rang false in it's portrayal from Lucy (who knows NOTHING of it) convincing Diana to perform her spell at 9pm instead of midnight because "Nine is three thrice." "The power of your spell will be magnified three times.", to the spell being cast (an annoying rhyming ditty), to an entire coven ignoring the first rule of Wicca "An it harm none do what ye will". Basically, play nice and don't harm others.

Oh Yeah, this Didn't Work Either: The Mystery? What mystery? Sure someone died. Sure someone is vandalizing Diana's property (which is never solved by the way.) The murder is ultimately solved but not by Lucy, who I would have thought would have a hand in it. No, all she did was stumble along and point fingers at people and talking about Diana behind her back. Oh and almost get killed because she was too stupid to notice her gas gauge was low. Anyway, back to that non-mystery. What really torqued my tonsils about this book was that there was no way to actually solve this mystery. There were no real clues with only one viable suspect and a couple vaguely suspicious ones. Too many of the characters had a 'weird' moment making them all suspect a bit. Now one or two character weirdnesses I normally would say "Hey, Doomis over there is actin' a bit shady. I bet he set fire to that nice magician back in April." but I couldn't do that to everyone without having to forfeit my Mystery Book Lovers club card, besides I love the decoder ring too much to even chance a false "Aha! Mr Green in the Library with the Revolver" moment.

In a Nutshell: I really didn't like this book (in case you missed all of my "This book Sucked" points up above). I'm regretting reading it. I'm thinking of never going to Tinker's Cove with Leslie Meier again. I'm actually thinking of boycotting Maine all together despite their lovely lobsters. Man I hope the entire cozy sub-genre is not ruined for me because of this book.....

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