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Wild Frontier Import


Price: CDN$ 38.95
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Vanderbilt CA.
2 new from CDN$ 38.95 6 used from CDN$ 6.98

Frequently Bought Together

Customers buy this album with Ballads & Blues (CD/DVD) CDN$ 17.95

Wild Frontier + Ballads & Blues (CD/DVD)
Price For Both: CDN$ 56.90

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 29 1992)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Virgin Records Us
  • ASIN: B000000WG3
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)

1. Over The Hills & Far Away
2. Wild Frontier
3. Take A Little Time
4. The Lover
5. Wild Frontier (12 Inch Version)
6. Friday On My Mind
7. Strangers In The Darkness
8. Thunder Rising
9. Johnny Boy
10. Over The Hills & Far Away (12 Inch Veriosn)
11. Crying In The Woods


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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
I never did buy Gary Moore's reinvention of himself - canny though it was - as a bluesman: he was always a hard rocker of that most fabulous seventies kind: big boots, tight jeans, mullet, foot to floor style of playing.
Here we find him in pretty much his last incarnation on the wild frontier before crossing the great divide into sell-out land, where history records he would go on to pretend he *still* had the blues, despite scant evidence of ever having had them in the first place.
On his way to the Wild Frontier, Gary Moore found himself at a cross roads: certainly, Heavy Rock wasn't just for hard men on motorbikes anymore - Bon Jovi had seen to that - but nor was it necessarily for a solely white audience either: Moore and his producer were clearly cognisant of the change ushered in by Aerosmith's collaboration with Run DMC on "Walk this Way" - alas all it culminated in during this session was a fairly lame rap remix of his excellent Easybeats cover, "Friday On My Mind". I suspect the remix hasn't made it onto the CD. No great loss.
In other ways Moore was returning to his Irish roots - there is a definite Gaelic feel to the cover of Big Country's "Over the Hills and Far Away", the title track, and "The Loner", the last of which is an instrumental for the late Phil Lynott of Thin Lizzy. Alas, it comes nowhere near the outstanding "Parisienne Walkways" which Moore recorded with Lynott before Lynott's death, but which you won't find on this album.
In any case I think this return to the roots was a good thing - certainly much more bona fide than the blues "renaissance" he would subsequently experience - and it sets this record apart from most of the others that were coming out at the time.
Wild Frontier has elegant cover art, too - or at least would have but for the prominence of Gary's ugly scowling mug and his decidedly unconvincing balled fist.
In any case well worth a spin.
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Format: Audio CD
I've owned copies of this album in three format: LP, cassette tape and CD. This is one of the few 80's recordings that sounds as fresh today as it did back in the days. "The Loner" still makes the hairs on the back of my neck stand up. "Over The Hills..." and "Wild Frontier" are notable in that they don't feature blistering guitar solos, yet they still rank among the best Moore compositions ever. In fact, this "Wild Frontier" is significant because it is NOT a "guitar" album - no flash, no gratuituous solos - but rather a collection of great songs written and performed by perhaps the most underrated rock guitarist in modern times. To me, Moore's recent blues tangent has grown old fast, but his 80's recordings are timeless. Also recommended: "Corridors of Power" and "G-Force."
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By Carlos Durand on Oct. 17 2001
Format: Audio CD
This later period masterpiece from Gary Moore (ex-Thin Lizzy) is a must for any hard rock collection. I would also recommend Victims of the Future and Corridors of Power.
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By M. Fonseca on March 30 2001
Format: Audio CD
Band line-up in this one: Gary Moore- guitar & vocals / Neil Carter - keyboards / Bob Daisley - bass. Produced by Peter Collins. The drums are made entirely by electronic devices. It's a great record, with meaningfull lyrics, great choruses, great solos. All the tunes are real cool. Gary is at top form here.
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