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Winning the Loser's Game Audio Cassette – Abridged, Audiobook


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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: America Media International; Abridged edition (March 5 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 193237826X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932378269
  • Product Dimensions: 18.3 x 11.1 x 3.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 145 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,082,635 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Oct. 11 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book stresses one of the most important "secrets" to long term investing success, that of not losing money on a particular investment. Warren Buffet also stresses this with his two rules of investing (rule number one, never lose money, rule number two, never forget rule number one). Many people think that's a big joke. They don't believe it can be done, and they believe it's worth losing money in search of a huge gain on an investment. Well, it can be done by buying and holding index funds, keeping the self-managed part of your portfolio down to a minimum, and staying away from speculative investments, though what's speculative is in the eye of the beholder. Permanent loss of capital is the single worst thing that can happen to your portfolio. It should be avoided at all costs. Just figure out what that capital could have grown to in an index fund for 20-30 years and you'll see what I mean. This book will help you see that, and contains much other useful information. It really will improve your results, and actually will reduce your time and effort you put into investing, as well as your stress level.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Michael Henry on Nov. 1 2001
Format: Hardcover
"Winning the Loser's Game" is a bit of a mess on several fronts. It primarily fails due to the ill conceived idea and sloppy execution of updating a book originally written for the institutional investor to also address the individual investor. In theory this should have been possible but neither Mr. Ellis nor his editors have invested the necessary effort to do a credible job. Advice for the individual investor is bolted on pretty much at random, with at times hilarious results. For example, the "Managing the Manager" chapter is filled with advice on setting a useful agenda for your quarterly meeting with your investment advisor organization (including criteria for deciding when to fire a portfolio manager!), and the role your investment committee should play in modifying your investment policy. In the same breath, Ellis also advises the individual investor in search of an investment vehicle to check with their employer's pension manager for the names of a few well respected mutual fund companies, for example, Vanguard and American Funds. In short, the entire chapter is for the institutional investor with the exception of this single paragraph on how to find a good mutual fund. Even at that, the advice is laughable. (I'm sure we are all on a first name basis with our employer's pension fund manager.....) This unsuccessful attempt to modify the book for the individual investor continues throughout. Even when Ellis directly discusses the individual investor we discover he is primarily concerned with that class of individual investor with "significant assets", that is, for investors who have retained advisors; not your garden variety working stiff saving for retirement.Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Steve Sproul on March 29 2000
Format: Hardcover
If you are interested in a well written, easy to understand and a book filled with the fruitful ideas for today's market, DO NOT BUY THIS BOOK! It was written by a fund investment advisor for fund investors. Dry antique investing methods that are totally outdated. If you are planning on taking control of your finances and successfully investing in today's markets, try something different.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Feb. 26 2002
Format: Hardcover
This could have been a good book in that the author has some very valid points. However both he and the editors at McGraw-Hill were quite lazy.
The book was originally written in 1985 with a target audience of professional investment managers and their large clients, such as pension funds and endowments. This 1998 edition was purportedly written for individual investors. Quite frankly, other than chapter 14, "The Individual Investor", it would be hard to tell that there was a change. Even this chapter is repetitive of previous material, including some of the same quotes.
The book is also padded beyond tolerance... in-page large-type quotes from the material in the chapter, numerous blank pages (30, 58, 70, 82, 112, 126, & 134), the same information recast as different tables & charts, and it still only manages to come to 137 pages. It's not clear why McGraw-Hill thinks it's worth [so much]. It's basically a long magazine article.
In addition, my experience is that McGraw-Hills editors have a real editorial quality control problem and it's most egregious in this book in the footnotes. For example: on page 40 the text refers to the "real" risk-free return as being before inflation and then the footnote to that text refers to "real" as being after being corrected for inflation; on page 55 the footnote purports to explain how 1.4 percentage points was calculated viz: "1.2 x 7 percent return on equities over and above the risk-free rate of return = 1.4 percent incremental return." (huh?); and (a nitpick, I know, but indicitive of their sloppiness) chapter 12 has two footnotes #3.
The author states that the book was written over an extended period in a social club in London and hotels and flights between Johannesburg, San Francisco, Chicago, Nairobi, Princeton, Maine, Bermuda, Vail, Boston, New York City, Atlanta, and his home. Perhaps if he had stayed in one spot it wouldn't have been so disjoint. The buying public deserves better.
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