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Wish


Price: CDN$ 22.95
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Frequently Bought Together

Wish + Kiss Me Kiss Me .. -Remaster + The Head on the Door -Remaster
Price For All Three: CDN$ 47.01

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 21 1992)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Elektra Entertain.
  • ASIN: B000002HAJ
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,058 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Open
2. High
3. Apart
4. From The Edge Of The Deep Green Sea
5. Wendy Time
6. Doing The Unstuck
7. Friday I'm In Love
8. Trust
9. A Letter To Elise
10. Cut
11. To Wish Impossible Things
12. End

Product Description

Product Description

The Cure ~ Wish

Amazon.ca

Another brilliant set of obsessive musings pried from Robert Smith's fuzzy navel. Epic elegies ("From the Edge of the Deep Green Sea") and tuneful romps ("Friday I'm In Love") are classic Cure cuts--Jeff Bateman

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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

By "hedwigschmidt" on March 1 2004
Format: Audio CD
ALTHOUGH I KNOW THAT MOST CURE FANS WILL DISAGREE, "WISH" IS PROBABLY ONE OF MY FAVORITE CURE CDs. OK, SO "FRIDAY I'M IN LOVE" IS A LITTLE TOO COMMERCIAL FOR MY TASTE; IT IS FUNNY! AND I, FOR ONE, CAN USE THE COMIC RELIEF WITHIN THIS STRANGE AND DARK JOURNEY THROUGH ROBERT SMITH'S MANIC-DEPRESSIVE MIND.
THIS IS MOSTLY A VERY DARK CD (BUT AREN'T THEY ALL, REALLY?)--LONLINESS, LOSS, DESPAIR, "FORCED" DRUNKENNESS, HATRED.... SMITH EXPRESSES DESPAIR AT WHAT HIS LIFE (AS AN MUSICICAN/POET) HAS BECOME, REMORISE AT HOW HE MUST BEHAVE IN ORDER TO MAKE OTHERS HAPPY (LOVERS, MANAGERS, FANS, ETC.).
BUT MY FAVORITE SONG ON THE ALBUM IS "LETTER TO ELISE." IT IS SO SAD, SWEET AND DELICATE, LIKE A VICTORIAN-ROMANTIC POEM OF LOST/UNREQUITED LOVE. IN FACT, IT REMINDS ME, UNCANNILY, OF MY FAVORITE POET, CHARLES ALGERNON SWINBURNE'S POEM "FELISE?" COINCIDENCE? I DON'T THINK SO...EITHER WAY, "LETTER TO ELISE" IS BITTER-SWEET, TEAR-INSPIRING, SADLY PERMENANT....
I HAVE ALWAYS BELIEVED ROBERT SMITH TO BE A MUSICAL AND POETIC GENIUS, AND THIS ALBUM PROVES IT, ONE MORE TIME, AS SURELY AS "DISINTEGRATION" AND "FAITH."
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Format: Audio CD
Hard to believe it's been 10+ years since this album was released. I first purchased it on cassette in 1992 and later on CD when the cassette literally wore itself out. To me "Wish" is the last, really good album by this group, with later efforts like "Wild Mood Swings" badly missing the mark. Often mis-classified as a Goth band, I rather think Robert Smith and The Cure simply tap into the quiet veins of sorrow and tragedy that run through every human life. It's not a bad thing, it's not a Goth thing, it just is. And while "Wish" is punctuated with occasional uppy songs like "Friday I'm in Love", the pieces that really soar are (of course) the sad ones: "Apart", "Letter to Elise" and the epic "To Wish Impossible Things". I once told someone that The Cure is the greatest break-up band of all time, and I stand by that assertion. "Wish" is a grand demonstration of everything that makes The Cure great, right before things started to go downhill. I've since heard rumors that The Cure are no more, that "Bloodflowers" is their last hurrah. If so, I choose to remember "Wish" as their last, best effort.
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Format: Audio CD
I am sure any Robert Smith worshiper--I refer to him individually here only because he, in every mannerism and lyrical nuance, is the Cure--would skoff at what I am about to write. Mostly because any serious musical enthusiast regards one--and only one--piece of work as the magnum opus of a favorite artist(The Beatles 'White' album, Pearl Jam's 'Ten' etc.)leaving all prior efforts, in retrospect, to be considered only warm-ups, and all entecedent releases falling drastically, if not unexpectedly short by comparison. I know. I know. The Cure hit their stride in the mid-eighties, reaching the creative peak of their unique mountain of cloudy melancholy with 'Disintegration' right? Well, in 1992, the Cure accomplished something of a miracle in the music business; they released a SECOND masterpiece entitled 'Wish', a dreamy weaveworld of emotive guitar pop, laced with too much sprawling conviction and ruminative honesty to be labeled 'radio friendly'--'Friday I'm in Love' notwithstanding, of course. 'Wish' runs the emotional gamut, infused with anger, nostalgia, longing, and even skip along happiness(which was unprecedented for the notoriously gloomy Cure) Each part is seperate--never redundant or plain-- yet unquestionably part of something whole. The perpetually love-sick Smith never seemed more confident in his romanticized confusion than when he bellows 'there is no one left in the world, there is only you' on the brilliantly lethargic ballad 'Trust', or more innocently childlike in the almost too-catchy-to-believe 'High'. 'Wish' undulates in a way that gets under your skin, much the way lyric-absent chill-out electronica attempts to do these days, except The Cure did it on a canvas of swirling colors without repetitive blurring, and WITH a an all too familiar voice to guide us. And that, after all, is what a great album makes, is it not? A winding road of a listening experience--a narrative fairy tale with a beginning and an end. But, boy how I wish this one hadn't...
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Format: Audio CD
Most Cure fans probably admire this album now, or at least individual songs. But you have to remember where things stood at the time. The Cure had built up a rabid fan base into the 1980's, not merely because they had recorded a substantial body of quality works, but also due to their stage shows, which were powerful experiences, and still are. So by the end of the decade the band had already carved out a place for itself in history, and had a devoted following.
On top of all that they released Disintegration, one of the best albums ever recorded by anyone, anytime. The Cure faithful went off the deep end into pure adulation, and they're still at it today, one of the strongest and most longstanding relationships between a band and its fans, ever. Disintegration is absolutely adored, people weep at the opening chimes, and for good reason, of course; I'm not a true believer, but I listen to it a couple times a month, at least - it's brilliant. The problem was that Disintegration was so good, it was impossible for Smith to follow it up, how could he? He had to live another decade to store up the emotions that poured out on Bloodflowers. So Wish was viewed as a poppy sell out at the time by many.
Now, in hindsight, Wish stands tall as a solid collection of wonderful songs, that had Disintegration never existed, probably would have adored nearly as much by the faithful. There are many solid gems here, songs that would be career highlights for a lesser composer than Smith. It has always be an album buried by the mountainous impact of Disintegration, and the recently released Trilogy DVD ups the ante once again; but it deserves more respect than that, and as the years pass, may receive it. It belongs in any collection.
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