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Wizard's First Rule Mass Market Paperback – Sep 30 2008


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 848 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Fantasy; Mti edition (Sept. 30 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765362643
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765362643
  • Product Dimensions: 17.1 x 10.7 x 4.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 408 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,091 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #574,043 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Big, bland and conventional, Goodkind's first novel is an epic fantasy that doesn't conjure up much magic. Its hero, Richard Cypher, is no ordinary woodsman. He is, at first unknown to himself, the "Seeker," wielder of the Sword of Truth and the only possessor of the arcane knowledge contained in the powerful Book of Counted Shadows. After his father is killed for refusing to disclose that book's location, Richard is wandering in his beloved forest when he spies a beautiful woman, Kahlan, being stalked by several assassins who have pursued her from her magic-filled homeland of the Midlands. Stalwart Richard saves Kahlan and, along with a wizard named Zedd, sets out to foil the power-hungry designs of the evil Midlands tyrant Darken Rahl. Many of the best moments here come during encounters with secondary characters: Adie, a crotchety old woman who traffics in Underworld magic by using bones; Rachel, an abused child who longs for her hair to be evenly trimmed; and Mistress Denna, a sadist who tortures Richard. Goodkind's writing improves as the book winds on, giving hope that the promised sequel will outclass this volume, but, for the most part, his prose is flat, his ideas hackneyed (Wizard's First Rule is, "people are stupid"), his characters tediously moralistic and his plot without originality.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

The protective barrier that separates Westland from its neighbors to the east is about to fall, letting loose a monstrous evil upon the world. Only the combined efforts of a young man dedicated to finding the truth, an enigmatic woman intent on concealing her past, and a crusty old hermit resigned to his inevitable destiny can prevent the opening of the three boxes of Orden-an event with the potential to destroy existence itself. The inclusion of graphic scenes of sado-eroticism, though integral to the story, may deter purchase by some libraries. Nevertheless, this first novel offers an intriguing variant on the standard fantasy quest. The richly detailed world and complex characters will appeal to mature fantasy aficionados.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Aaron Lohr on April 12 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book created quite a stir in the fantasy genre. Some people loved it and some hated it. I wanted to give it a fair chance and just finished it. I can't tell you whether you'll like it or not, because this is a book where it really depends on what you want from a story. So I'll tell you what it offers and where it comes up short.
First you need to know it follows an over-used fantasy theme. An unknown man who doesn't want to be a hero, finds out he is very special and needed to save the world. He ends up being a fierce warrior who wins the heart of the beauty. The bad guy is super evil, and the good guys are super pure. There is an old man who serves as the mentor and he's wise yet spunky.
Many of you will be turned off at this point. But hold on. As formulaic as it is, Goodkind really does string together a nice adventure. Just when I would begin to think it was getting mindless, he would have a really beautiful scene.
There are torture scenes that are vivid, and I was wary of that going in. But he doesn't use them for shock value as some may think. He has a point and makes it very well. It was one of the only scenes that really gripped my emotions. It was quite inspiring.
The female roles in the book are fairly weak. The leading lady is often controlled by her emotions and love for the main character. Lots of crying.
The world Goodkind has constructed, the different creatures, and the way he uses magic are unique and creative. He often explains why magic works the way it does, and it isn't too way out there.
And while this book is one in a series, you can read just this one and it ends well enough so you don't feel you have to read the next one. So it doesn't hurt to give it a chance. If you like this kind of story, you will certainly enjoy this book. I think it is a good one. However, if you're tired of this storyline, you may want to check out something else. I hope this was helpful.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J.H. "Jon" on March 19 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I just figured I'd share -- I tried five or six times to try and read this book because it has gotten such good reviews. However, the storyline and characters are atrocious. Clue 1: Richard's evil politician brother early on delivers a diatribe against the evils of fire and how they have to strive against it, and the people listening to him don't think he sounds like a dork, railing against fire? give me a break. Clue 2. After the aforementioned speech, the brother goes over and [touches] Richard's new woman friend Kahlan upon being introduced to her, and while Richard and Kahlan are naturally surprised, their reactions are very inauthentic, and the narration does not bother to point out how ridiculous it is for the brother to come over and [touch] a woman he's never met right in front of his brother. Clue 3: Richard, who is not the adventuring sort, gets the Sword of Truth; he and the woman Kahlan meet up with some ranger friend of Richard's, who despite knowing that Richard is not the adventuring sort, listens to Richard explain how he must go on a quest for about 2 minutes and then very solemnly declares that he will protect them -- as corny as it gets. Other clues -- there's very little originality in the book. Maybe if it had an original concept or magic this would redeem it, but it doesn't. Even the bad guy Darken Rahl has a very derivative name.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Jan. 21 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I really tried to like this book. Yet, right from the start, I found the protagonist, Richard, extremely annoying. He's just another in a long list of whiny, crying, vomiting main characters that often turn up in fantasy novels, which lead you to find some secondary character to latch onto. Unfortunately, neither Zedd nor Kahlan themselves are all that interesting. Zedd is your stereotypical wizard-type who can do all sorts of magical things and speaks in riddles. Kahlan is a little better, but then Goodkind kills it by making her the "Madonna" who can't have sex. I was very troubled by Denna as well, the dominatrix-type who tortures Richard in a sequence that went on way too long. She plays the "Whore" to Kahlan's character. Of course, Richard breaks his torturer (Denna), she falls in love with him and then he kills her. I don't know what kind of message Goodkind is trying to send with this but, then again, maybe I do. Once again, women are defined by their sexuality. All in all, I didn't find Goodkind's world very imaginative, but if you like your main character crying, pleading, begging for his life and then in the next microsecond killing people, maybe this is for you. Ridiculous.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By not4prophet on Aug. 10 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you like lengthy discussions of pedophilia and descriptions of sexual torture, then you'll probably enjoy "Wizard's First Rule". If, on the other hand, you believe that those topics are best excluded from fantasy writing, then you should probably avoid this book like the plague. It would be no exaggeration to say that "Wizard's First Rule" is, by a considerable margin, the worst book I've ever read. It trundles along without any hint of originality or inspiration, and the bizarre and unpleasant sexual content is added frequently in a failed attempt to break the monotony of the paint-by-numbers plot. At the end, all you can do is gape in awe at the author's total incompetence and wonder how anyone with an IQ higher than 30 could possibly find as much as a single redeeming quality in this mess.
We start with an evil overlord, who bears the idiotic name of Darken Rahl. (His father is named Panis Rahl. I kid you not.) Darken happens to need a magic object (in this case, it's a box) to fulfill his desire to take over the world. Starting to sound familiar? It gets worse. We meet a noble but somewhat reluctant hero named Richard Cypher. Richard is mentored by a wise, gray-haired wizard. He also falls in love with a beautiful woman named Kahlan. Unfortunately, an ancient form of magic prevents Kahlan from having sex with any man that she's in love with (D'oh!), but she does the next best thing, following Richard all over the place and offering up dialogue so corny that it would make George Lucas blush ("I can't go on anymore without telling you about me. About what I am. It's cleaving my heart, because I'm supposed to be your friend.
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