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Wonderwall [Blu-ray] [Import]


List Price: CDN$ 28.51
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Product Details

  • Format: NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Shout Factory
  • Release Date: March 25 2014
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00HS3KV0G

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: DVD
An earlier reviewer called this a period piece, and I think that's exactly the right spirit needed to enjoy the film.
For those of us too young to remember 1969, this is a rather remarkable time capsule of values and social relationships. Most striking is the sense that the film seems to have been made by young people with really no idea of how older people live their lives. That wouldn't be a great problem, except that the film itself takes the generation gap as its central feature: how an older man living a boring, empty, unfulfilling life glimpses (but cannot participate in) the colorful, uninhibited, sensual lives of younger people.
On the other hand, while the film is clearly enamored with the hip glamor of youth and beauty, it also suggests that young people bridge the gender gap principally to have sex with each other. Otherwise, they don't have much to say. Strange! I remember getting that same sense from The Graduate (not to compare the two).
Anyway, I think the dvd is recommendable. Good picture, good music (of course), very good extras, and an interesting snapshot of a time and place.
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Format: DVD
The recent demise of George Harrison has prompted renewed interest in his work.
This movie, originally released in England in 1968, was more notable in it's release for George Harrison's sondtrack than for the movie itself.
The soundtrack demonstrated that despite his interest in Indian music and Hindu religion, George had not lost his touch in the writing of songs. His expanding musical tastes are well illustrated here with most of the tracks using indian instruments. There are also aspects of the bizarre with the honky tonk piano of one track being speeded up and the track with the heavy metal riff played by Eric Clapton.
Readers might think it strange that a review of the DVD should focus so much on the music but my rationale in doing so lies more in my perception of George Harrison. Allow me to explain. A lot of the movies of the period were smitten with the sex, drugs and rock'n'roll of the sixties. A number of cinematographers were themselves users of mind altering chemicals and it shows. It is easy to characterise Wonderwall as another Magical Mystery Tour, especially given that one particular person was involved in both ventures but I believe that perception to be wrong.
George Harrison, the Quiet One (sorry George) was known to have a quick wit, which endeared him so much to Lennon, and a sharp sense of humour. This, for me at least, is the key. Wonderwall is a quirky, semi-psychedelic comedy which explains Harrison's involvement. The music reflects his perceptions as it changes scenes. It is easy to be reminded of MMT but it also reminds me of Barabarella.
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Format: DVD
This is the perfect relaxing movie to watch when you are doing something else like reading the paper or writing a poem. The movie is about a stuffy, scientist, going through a midlife crisis, that falls in love with a model that he peers at through holes in his back wall. The movie is essentially a sesame-street-level version of Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse. The dialogue is so infrequent and unnecessary that this might as well have been filmed as a silent movie, except for the wonderful, druggy, experimental, 60's soundtrack by George Harrison. You'll probably find the music to be sumptuous, and enjoyable if you have old Tangerine Dream records and like early Pink Floyd. The female lead, which appears mostly as a dreamy image, is played by Jane Birkin. If you get a chance, find an old 45 she recorded during this era (that was banned by the Vatican) calle JeTemm (sp?). She has an orgasm on the record. The 45 was a big hit in Europe. In any case, the movie is so slow moving, that despite some incredible images (wait until you see the dandy driving the green car), this movie is only watchable if you are doing something else. Brian Eno and others have waxed eloquently about the benefits of listening to really good "ambient music" while you are doing other things, to help inspire you and relax you and tittilate you without overwhelming your senses and choking your industry. Well, this is a first rate "ambient film." This is a really fine movie to have on the TV while you are painting a watercolor or writing an old friend a thoughtful letter.
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Format: VHS Tape
Penned by Roman Polanski's scriptwriter, Gerard Brach, "Wonderwall" is a mildly trippy look at obsession and repression, voyerism and sex. The plot is simplicity itself: a mild-mannered professor finds a spyhole in his living room which allows him to become involved in a world of young, Mod, Londoners (circa 1967). Through this hole (his "wonderwall") the professor becomes entwined in a world of fantasy and sexual chemistry and becomes both transformed and the transformer. Directed by the talented Joe Massot (also known for directing Zeppelin's "Song Remains the Same" and the equally wonderfully weird "Zachariah"), "Wonderwall" is filled with bright colour, groovy sounds and a decidedly 60's visual style. It's also been digitally spiffed up and features extended soundtrack music (by George Harrison). My only personal disappointment is with Jack MacGowran, who plays the professor. While he is a brilliant actor, and was wonderful in "How I Won The War", I find him slightly miscast here. But, all-in-all, "Wonderwall" is a minor treat.
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