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WordNet 3 (largest English dictionary and thesaurus)
 
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WordNet 3 (largest English dictionary and thesaurus) [Kindle Edition]

Cognitive Science Laboratory
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Product Description

WordNet is a lexical database of the English language containing about 150,000 words organized in over 115,000 synsets for a total of 207,000 word-sense pairs. It groups English nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs into sets of cognitive synonyms called synsets each expressing a distinct concept. WordNet provides short, general definitions, and records conceptual-semantic and lexical relations between these synonym sets. The resulting network of meaningfully related words and concepts is a combination of dictionary and thesaurus that is more intuitively usable than traditional dictionaries.

This Kindle edition is a fully functional dictionary and thesaurus and can be installed as a default dictionary on the Kindle.

Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved. For license and terms of use please see the complete text of the license inside the publication.

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Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Hookin' Up Words and Phrases Feb. 21 2013
By John M. Ford TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Kindle Edition
WordNet is a database in which English nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs are linked together by semantic relationships such as synonymy, entailment, and so on. The Kindle version allows readers / users to look up words and navigate through the database by following relational links.

WordNet's "...purpose is twofold: to produce a combination of dictionary and thesaurus that is more intuitively usable, and to support automatic text analysis and artificial intelligence applications." This book contains release 3.0 of the WordNet database originally developed under the direction of George Miller and his team of cognitive scientists at Princeton University.

The Kindle implementation seems to meet WordNet's second objective better than its first. The sparse definitions do not satisfy the usual needs of dictionary users. It is not, in my opinion, a worthwhile replacement for the dictionary bundled with the Kindle. It is useful to me as a text analysis support tool because I use the WordNet database along with the WordStat automated content analysis software. It is helpful to manually navigate WordNet's web of semantic relationships as I use the software to build content dictionaries for document classification.

I recommend the book if you are doing similar work in text analysis. You may also find Fellbaum's WordNet: An Electronic Lexical Database useful for its more extensive discussion of WordNet's design and intended applications.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars  39 reviews
69 of 71 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most useful to me beyond the built-in dictionary on Kindle. Jan. 2 2010
By Kindle Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
WordNet3 is fascinating. For now I am not planning to substitute it as my default dictionary. I find Kindle's built-in New Oxford American Dictionary to be a solid resource and not particularly improved on by the Webster Dictionary and Thesaurus. The latter so far seems more likely to define words too flippantly or tersely by a just shift in the part of speech.

However, this one -- WordNet 3-- is quite useful for digging deeper into word usage and options when I am writing. It is helpful to read the introduction early in your use of the product. Definitions or entries are not only divided under the main categories of noun, adjective, verb, adverb but also by subcategories such as: synonyms, usage domains, hypernyms, hyponyms, part holonyms, derivative-related forms, part meronyms, etc. However, in most cases the context is sufficient to make use of these, and one does not need to get lost in the subcategories. They are fine nuances present for the obsessive or those interested in using the word relationships in computerized translation or artificial intelligence programs. (Impressive in that it is also essentially public domain.)

The breadth of coverage is quite extensive. Curiously I didn't find much in the way of antonyms. But I guess one resource can't do everything --- yet at least.

The combined pairing of Kindle's Built-in Default and this one is indeed powerful.
37 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A first in a new generation of dictionaries Dec 9 2009
By Books-An-Hour - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
This is the first dictionary that I have seen, which takes an old idea of a "dictionary" and reinvents it for the new century. All the words in WordNet are interconnected whether through semantic or logical relationships. The dictionary is huge, with lots of synonyms and examples given for each word. In WordNet I have found a new perspective on how words work in language and reasoning.

Highly recommended!
28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Meaningful Dictionary Dec 1 2009
By Paul Durrant - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
An excellent conversion by Osnova of this BSD licensed dictionary/thesaurus database to Mobipocket/Kindle dictionary form. It can be used as the default dictionary on a Kindle, and can also be used as a dictionary with other Mobipocket readers, as it is pleasingly free from DRM.

It contains both American and English spellings, has hyperlinks from words in definitions to further defintions, and is nicely formatted.

An absolute bargain, given the time must have been spent on tweaking the conversion.
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hookin' Up Words and Phrases March 31 2011
By John M. Ford - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
WordNet is a database in which English nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs are linked together by semantic relationships such as synonymy, entailment, and so on. The Kindle version allows readers / users to look up words and navigate through the database by following relational links.

WordNet's "...purpose is twofold: to produce a combination of dictionary and thesaurus that is more intuitively usable, and to support automatic text analysis and artificial intelligence applications." This book contains release 3.0 of the WordNet database originally developed under the direction of George Miller and his team of cognitive scientists at Princeton University.

The Kindle implementation seems to meet WordNet's second objective better than its first. The sparse definitions do not satisfy the usual needs of dictionary users. It is not, in my opinion, a worthwhile replacement for the dictionary bundled with the Kindle. It is useful to me as a text analysis support tool because I use the WordNet database along with the WordStat automated content analysis software. It is helpful to manually navigate WordNet's web of semantic relationships as I use the software to build content dictionaries for document classification.

I recommend the book if you are doing similar work in text analysis. You may also find Fellbaum's WordNet: An Electronic Lexical Database useful for its more extensive discussion of WordNet's design and intended applications.
20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars WordNet is *not* the largest English dictionary Sept. 13 2010
By Y. Lai - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
WordNet 3 is a fine dictionary for Kindle, although since WordNet is developed for artificial intelligence, it lacks pronounciation, inflection and ethymology, which you might expect, if you are not familiar with the difference of WordNet to a regular dictionary.

But I am really puzzled how OSNOVA came to the claim that WordNet (with 155,000 entries) is the largest English dictionary and thesaurus. FYI: The largest English dictionary is still the The Oxford English Dictionary, the last printed, 20 volume OED2 had about 290,000 main entries, the current online OED (by the June 2010 OED3 update) has 264,000. The largest thesaurus is the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary, which has 236,000 categories.
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