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World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War Hardcover – Sep 12 2006


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World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War + The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead + The Zombie Survival Guide: Recorded Attacks
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Crown; 1 edition (Sept. 12 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307346609
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307346605
  • Product Dimensions: 16.4 x 3.4 x 24.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 590 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #51,800 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Brooks, the author of the determinedly straight-faced parody The Zombie Survival Guide (2003), returns in all seriousness to the zombie theme for his second outing, a future history in the style of Theodore Judson's Fitzpatrick's War. Brooks tells the story of the world's desperate battle against the zombie threat with a series of first-person accounts "as told to the author" by various characters around the world. A Chinese doctor encounters one of the earliest zombie cases at a time when the Chinese government is ruthlessly suppressing any information about the outbreak that will soon spread across the globe. The tale then follows the outbreak via testimony of smugglers, intelligence officials, military personnel and many others who struggle to defeat the zombie menace. Despite its implausible premise and choppy delivery, the novel is surprisingly hard to put down. The subtle, and not so subtle, jabs at various contemporary politicians and policies are an added bonus. (Sept.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

"The Crisis" nearly wiped out humanity. Brooks (son of Mel Brooks and author of The Zombie Survival Guide, 2003) has taken it upon himself to document the "first hand" experiences and testimonies of those lucky to survive 10 years after the fictitious zombie war. Like a horror fan's version of Studs Terkel's The Good War (1984), the "historical account" format gives Brooks room to explore the zombie plague from numerous different views and characters. In a deadpan voice, Brooks exhaustively details zombie incidents from isolated attacks to full-scale military combat: "what if the enemy can't be shocked and awed? Not just won't, but biologically can't!" With the exception of a weak BAT-21 story in the second act, the "interviews" and personal accounts capture the universal fear of the collapse of society--a living nightmare in which anyone can become a mindless, insatiable predator at a moment's notice. Alas, Brad Pitt's production company has purchased the film rights to the book--while it does have a chronological element, it's more similar to a collection of short stories: it would make for an excellent 24-style TV series or an animated serial. Regardless, horror fans won't be disappointed: like George Romero's Dead trilogy, World War Z is another milestone in the zombie mythos. Carlos Orellana
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Terence Tan Co on Sept. 15 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of the best books that I have read in a long while. Its descriptions of a zombie holocaust and the worldwide response to it is realistic.

The book is a collection of short stories told as a post war interview of survivors.

Stories range from all over the world(including outer space)a young soldier who recounts the disastrous battle of Yonkers where "shock and awe" tactics failed in the face of mindless undead hordes to the actions of the Chinese submarine commander.

What surprised me is the great amount of sympathy the reader gets when he reads some of the heart breaking tales in the book and even some of the ironic and even surprise twists that you get after some of the stories(eg. the twist at the end of the one about the inventor of the Redekker plans leaves a lot of questions and is quite unexpected).

Even after two readings, I was left with the feeling that I would like to know more about the world of world war z...Its a feeling rarely found in many a book...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Propaganda is Painless on Feb. 14 2009
Format: Paperback
This book is far better than any book about zombies has a right to be. A collection of stories, featured documentary style from the survivors of the fictional zombie affliction that nearly destroyed mankind. While the zombie war was fictional, it reads very real throughout this book. You feel as if these stories come from real survivors of a real catastrophy. Funny, clever, horrific - you get it all here. Surprisingly very very good.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By T. Smith on March 4 2007
Format: Hardcover
After reading and discussing this book with others, I now find there is a significant subculture surrounding Zombie lore, that I wasn't familiar with.

I bought the book sight-unseen (not a huge zombie afficionado), thinking that it would be good popcorn for a vacation; I was exceedingly surprised at what I was reading.

The zombies are there for sure, but they are really tertiary plot devices to the fantastic narrative, and the personal stories and scenarios that Brooks uses to tell the tale. Because the book is completely anecdotal, there isn't a traditional plot - yet you keep flipping page after page to see what insight (several aha! moments) and character might pop up next.

The only criticism I might have is the highly 'ordnance heavy' sections (Brooks likes his weapons I think), but even then - it is a war, and it interesting to see how traditional tools of destruction are unable to match the "Z's" tenacity.

Kudos Brooks! An excellent work, engaging and innovative. A must read for anyone that has ever wondered "if they move so slow, why don't you just run away?".

TMS
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By nyssalalala on May 29 2008
Format: Paperback
For starters, I'm not a fan of zombie movies. However, my dad had left this book lying around one day and started to read it. It was one of those few books that grabbed my full attention from start to end. I thought it was a very good read. I do read a lot and finish most books, but this was one of those few books that I've read cover-to-cover in a while without getting bored during the process.

It is told as a report on the Zombie Wars, written in first-person accounts of the war that took place in a not so distant future. I enjoyed how the author unfolded the story, with different patches coming together and eventually creating this huge world.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By J. Friesen on Oct. 12 2006
Format: Hardcover
This book is essentially a description of a future war with hordes of zombies told via interviews and news clips. Of course, for the narrative, they all take place well after the event, but the collection is enrapturing. Sometimes, some of the best parts of a movie about zombies, are the news clips and interviews the characters see on TV/hear on the radio, and that's basically what this book is all about.

From the interviews with soldiers fighting drug lords in Central Asia and doctors trying to stem the 'disease' in China, to action reports from the front lines of troops fighting the zombies to average citizens telling their tales of survival, it is a collection of anecdotes that are sometimes humourous, terrifying, or just plain intriguing.

A good solid read that kept me turning the pages until late into the night.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Stover TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Oct. 7 2010
Format: Paperback
Oh, zombie, where is thy sting? Brooks' novel was a sensation a few years back, in part because it unfolds the story of the great Zombie war within a fictionalized oral history modelled on Studs Terkels structured oral histories of World War II, the Great Depression and other major American events. It's a clever conceit, though moving from narrator to narrator (and country to country) works against the development of suspense at points, much less horror.

More than 40 years after George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead started our never-ending fascination with zombies, the rightness of some of Romero's choices related to the wrongness of some of the choices of other zombie chroniclers only stands out more. Brooks goes with what's now become the almost cliched viral/rabies model of zombieism -- zombieism is spread by bite or by zombie body matter getting into an exposed cut or otherwise somehow getting into one's bloodstream. This probably seems like a good idea, but the number of pandemics in human history spread through these means is, roughly, zero. It's just not that effective a means of viral or bacterial propagation, which is why we don't all have rabies right now.

Romero, of course, never explained what was actually causing zombies in his first two zombie movies. More importantly, there was no 'Patient Zero' style beginning point -- one day, everyone who ever died and had enough flesh left on his or her bones to allow for mobility rose from the grave. And everyone who died after that, regardless of cause of death, would also rise from the dead. Now that's a disease vector that could overwhelm civilization!
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