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Xenocide School & Library Binding – Aug 1 1992


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Product Details

  • School & Library Binding: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Turtle Back Books (Aug. 1 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785716343
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785716341
  • Product Dimensions: 3.7 x 11.4 x 17.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (172 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,716,177 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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<Today one of the brothers asked me: Is it a terrible prison, not to be able to move from the place where you're standing?> Read the first page
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3.8 out of 5 stars
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Cameron-Smith TOP 50 REVIEWER on Jan. 11 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In this, the third novel in the Ender series, the world of Lusitania is under threat. The planet is in rebellion, and the Starways Congress fears that if the descolada virus escapes from Lusitania all humanity will be at risk. The descolada virus kills all humans with which it comes into contact but the pequeninos (piggies) require it for the third stage of their life cycle. The human colonists on Lusitania eat food laced with inhibitors to keep the virus at bay. The Starways Congress has decided to destroy the planet: a fleet is on its way with the means to sterilize the planet.

If Lusitania is destroyed, then other sentient species will be destroyed. Andrew (Ender) Wiggins is working to prevent this, and the plot turns on whether Andrew, the members of his family and the leaders of the other species can work together to prevent this multiple xenocide. Research is undertaken in the hope that the descolada's deadly components can be neutralised without destroying the virus.

But the ultimate fate of Lusitania may rest with the Chinese Taoist colony of Path, with Han Fei-Tzu and his daughter Qing-Jao (`Gloriously Bright'). Gloriously Bright is able to discover various truths, but is unable to deal with some of the reality exposed.

`There are many different purposes in this world, many different causes of everything.'

Xenocide is a long novel with multiple themes. The themes of duty and absolution that were so much a part of `Speaker for the Dead' are continued, but there is also considerable reflection on the nature of life and the consequence of choice. Families are split apart as well during the battle to save or destroy Lusitania.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Daiken on Aug. 2 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I just finished reading all the books in the Ender series, and I loved them all. Xenocide was very different from the others but still a great read. The ending also leaves you hanging so make sure you have Children of the Mind nearby to continue reading! The beginning Chinese philosophical chapters are a bit dull but they'll make more sense later in the book. The author could have spent less time on those chapters but I guess that was his choice. The book was still worth reading.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Vahania63 on May 27 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
With every book in Ender series it's becoming more complex and sophisticated. This book is full of very interesting mostly phylosophical (especially interesting on role of religion) and metaphysical discussions. The drawback is that it's much more difficult to read. It takes some effort (at least this was the case for me) to get to the end. Although the series started as quite typical sci-fi I can't consider it to be this genre anymore (the presense of another planet and alien cultures notwithstanding). I am not saying that it's a shortcoming but it's something that future readers need to keep in mind not to be disappointed. I believe Orson Scott Card is a very smart person but not a great writer (if you judge his novels by such criterias as plot and character development). Still, it's a very interesting book assuming you know what to expect.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Max on Feb. 8 2004
Format: Paperback
I've scanned some of the reviews for this book, to find that a lot of people found Card's change of pace difficult to digest. I suppose people were hoping for a similar dosage of brash suspense and violent conflict. Xenocide delivers something much different. Orson Scott Card is probably one of the few Sci-Fi writers who could get away with creating his own science. Some may argue that he does not accomplish that in this novel, but I beg to differ. Xenocide reads far more like a journey into the psyche of the feeble-brained human, than a simple conflict of interest which is once again, perpetuated by the patriotic, but ultiamtely antagonistic, Starways Congress. Card decided to write something less like a simple novel, and more like a philosophical odyssey. This book also tackles a very popular sci-fi issue of artificial intelligence, but with a complete twist. In this book, readers will actually feel a great deal of empathy for the one called "Jane." Her character makes this novel an emotional masterpiece... it may even be enough to bring one to tears. And the villians of the novel turn out to be multi-dimensioned to the nth degree. And finally, you are left with the story of many factions, fighting to do what they believe is right, and none seeming to be ultimately evil or ultimately good.
Card exposes the flaws and the beauty of the human psyche in what is easily one of his best works to date.
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By Clay Bergen on March 30 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The wish for faster than light travel was a little too much to take in. A little too weird for my liking.
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By Blackrabbit on Feb. 3 2014
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Started great, fell apart in the last quarter. It became cumbersome, and convoluted, and far too overcomplicated, in my opinion, completely without any reason.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you were thinking this would be like Enders Game, you would be wrong. It is both stranger and grander than that as it follows Enders next steps. The introduction of species and religion and fanaticism into this story is interesting and gripping and yet distracting as a follow up to Enders Game.

The concepts of Gaia and the symbiosis of the main races involved is amazing story telling. The breadth of this book was immense in both time and space. Following Ender, and now Jane, kept me intrigued throughout.

Worth reading, but not what you expected. I sense Card's religious background noodling into the plot line. But it works.
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