The Year's Best Science Fiction: Seventh Annual Collection and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Year's Best Science Fiction: Seventh Annual Collection Hardcover – Jun 1990


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 158.50 CDN$ 10.36

Best Books of 2014
Unruly Places, Alastair Bonnett’s tour of the world’s most unlikely micro-nations, moving villages, secret cities, and no man’s lands, is our #1 pick for 2014. See all



Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Bluejay (June 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312044518
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312044510
  • Product Dimensions: 23.9 x 16 x 5.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,610,606 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
Dozois is, and has long been, one of the best editors and anthologizers in all of SF. The anthology ranges over the many different sub-genres of Science Fiction, and I therefore cannot say I enjoyed all of his stories; nevertheless, all were well-written, and some of the stories were among the best I've ever read. I strongly recommend this and any other of Dozois' "Year's Best..." series.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By John M. Ford TOP 100 REVIEWER on Feb. 23 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This is the seventh volume in the Gardner Dozois Year's Best Science Fiction series. It opens with the expected summation of developments in SF during 1989. Each of the 25 stories is introduced with a concise summary of the author's background and other works. As expected.

Five stories I liked:

Kathe Koja's "Skin Deep" follows a man who takes a great deal for granted in the only close relationship of his life. One day he decides to probe a little deeper.

In Robert Silverberg's "Tales of the Venia Woods" two children find a remnant of the old empire and decide to keep it secret. An easy decision when made in the innocence of childhood.

Nancy Kress's "The Price of Oranges" is a charming time travel tale spun from a grandfather's love for his granddaughter. And his keen sense of the value of a dollar.

Michael Swanwick's "The Edge of the World" is about nothing. A yawning, bottomless abyss captures the imagination of children who live next to it. Then they find the stairs that lead down.

John Varley's "Just Another Perfect Day" is about the value of time and how it slips from our grasp. A man wakes up far in his future to a new life and a very full day.

This is another good collection. Dozois has really hit his stride with this series. Enjoy!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Not Free SF Reader May 30 2008
By Blue Tyson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A fair bit down this volume, for a Dozois Year's Best. A 3.62 average, and a lot more than usual of the fairy pollution. The only one worthy of inclusion as being particularly good is Somtow's extremely funny Thai supernatural story. While it is good to know that Robert Sampson has written about pulp heroes, and worth chasing up, that story couldn't be any more lightweight if you put it in a balloon full of helium. Probably the most pointless Connie Willis story I have seen, too.

This volume, therefore, is sneak into over 4.25 round up to 4.5 territory.

The other standout is also amusing, just not in the laugh out loud way, and belongs to Charles Sheffield.

You can certainly see a marked contrast in tone between this volume, and some of the recent variety, too.

Dozois references one of his earlier series commentaries on publishing, remarking that it is almost amazing that good SF books are still published, even though publishing declined a little in this year, in general. Given that he was bemoaning the climbing amount of tie-ins etc., in 1977 and this book is in 1990, and the trend is still upward in both tie-in properties and in numbers of books published.

Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Tiny Tango - Judith Moffett
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Out of Copyright - Charles Sheffield
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : For I Have Touched the Sky - Mike Resnick
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Alphas - Gregory Benford
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : At the Rialto - Connie Willis
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Skin Deep - Kathe Koja
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : The Egg - Steven Popkes
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Tales from the Venia Woods - Robert Silverberg
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Visiting the Dead - William King
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Dori Bangs - Bruce Sterling
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : The Ends of the Earth - Lucius Shepard
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : The Price of Oranges - Nancy Kress
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Lottery Night - S. P. Somtow
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : A Deeper Sea - Alexander Jablokov
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : The Edge of the World - Michael Swanwick
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Silver Lady and the Fortyish Man - Megan Lindholm
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : The Third S3x - Alan Brennert
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Winter on the Belle Fourche - Neal Barrett, Jr.
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Enter a Soldier Later Enter Another - Robert Silverberg
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Relationships - Robert Sampson
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Just Another Perfect Day - John Varley
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : The Loch Moose Monster - Janet Kagan
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : The Magic Bullet - Brian M. Stableford
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : The Odd Old Bird - Avram Davidson
Year's Best Science Fiction 07 : Great Work of Time - John Crowley

AIDS survival crossdress meltdown mutant melon alien hibernation.

4 out of 5

Dead egghead clone draft team terraforming match winning streak so organised, you'd think it's a crime.

4.5 out of 5

Reading not for local girls.

3 out of 5

Journey to the Centre of Venus, no thanks.

4 out of 5

Quantum conference definitely pointless.

2.5 out of 5

Alien ho soap watching group.

3 out of 5

Gray alien nanny centaur pet kid save.

4 out of 5

No ghost, just an old emperor type.

3 out of 5

If you don't take a clone army to a clone war, then, fundamentally, you are stoopid.

3.5 out of 5

Art and music maybes.

3.5 out of 5

Writer's Guatemalan getaway gains girl, but the local game proves a tad gruesome.

4 out of 5

Everything used to be cheap, but relatives are still weird.

3.5 out of 5

Ancestor reincarnation best mate foreign winner.

4.5 out of 5

Dolphin war great white space saviour.

4 out of 5

Unwise excursion can get a bloke absolutely lost.

3.5 out of 5

Department storie Merlin.

3.5 out of 5

Androgynous reunion fulfillment.

4 out of 5

Poetess Crow defense purloining.

3 out of 5

Socratic simulation Conquistador convo.

4 out of 5

Old flame matchmaking.

3 out of 5

Multi-dimensional Martian memory loop man for the job.

3.5 out of 5

Is moose, no squirrel, plenty of Odders.

4 out of 5

Female immortality killing.

4 out of 5

Archaeopteryx, more like chicken, or lizard?

3.5 out of 5

Time travel profiteering problematic.

3.5 out of 5

4.5 out of 5
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A less successful collection than in previous years, but still at a quite respectable level March 12 2012
By Darth Maciek - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
In this book Gardner Dozois collected the stories he considered as the best of those written in 1989. Sadly however, this anthology is the much weaker than those from six previous years (1983-1988), with even the renowned authors (like Bruce Sterling and even Robert Silverberg) providing some weaker stories. Also, as it is the case frequently in those anthologies, some of the stories can hardly be considered as science-fiction - some are in fact fantastic tales or even horror stories. However I don't think this is such a bad thing for this particular anthology, because some of the best stories belong to this category.

In the long introduction there is as always a review of what happened in SF in this particular year (here 1989) and at the end there are the very precious "honorable mentions" - recommendations of good SF stories from 1989 which for lack of place couldn't be included in the collection.
However for the first time in the introduction Gardner Dozois made also a comment on world events which occurred in 1989, or more precisely one of them - the Rushdie affair. He found it incredible that in 1989 AD a writer can face the worst kind of censorship, namely the death sentence for his writings and he also warned against the threat of censorship in the future. He somehow however forgot to stress the point that this danger of censorship came not from the "tyrannical" American government (a topic typical for so many SF writers) or from the Pentagon, but from the Islamic world and from a revolutionary anti-Western government...

Second thing that I noticed about this point - Gardner Dozois somehow didn't judge it worthy to devote even one sentence to the greatest event in 1989: the spectacular fall of no less than five totalitarian oppressive regimes from June to December of this year, the event now frequently called the Autumns of Nations. He somehow failed to see anything extraordinary in the fact that five countries (in chronological order Poland, Hungary, East Germany, Czechoslovakia and Romania) liberated themselves from tyranny and even better, in the case of first four of them they did it without even one drop of blood being spilled! From everything Gardner Dozois always wrote I thought he was very preoccupied with the progress of freedom in the world - but clearly, when the totalitarian tyrannies deemed "progressive" are falling, the left winged intellectuals seem not be so happy about it...

Below you will find my impressions about the stories in this collection, with some limited SPOILERS:

"Tiny tango" by Judith Moffett - this was a very big disappointment; in the previous anthology figured "Hob" - a wonderful, clever and heartwarming story by the same author. The "Tiny tango" is a kind of sequel to "Hob", but instead of cleverness and wonder, this one is filled with disgusting mess! Author slammed in this story AIDS epidemic, pogroms, a nuclear accident, genetic mutations and the arrival of aliens and chose for the narrator a woman who spends her time cross dressing and, equipped with a false penis (I am not kidding!), watching men urinating in public toilets! Bottom line - it is a bad, messy story with some disgusting moments.

"Out of copyright" by Charles Sheffield - unlike the previous one, this story is quite good, with a very smart punch line. It tells the story of great minds of the past (like Isaac Newton) "resurrected" by cloning and programming and employed in teams by private companies competing mainly for the big public contracts in space. The story is clever and quite twisted and nothing more will be said to avoid spoilers. Enjoy!

"For I have touched the sky" by Mike Resnick - this is a sequel for the "Kirinyaga", a very powerful (even cruel) and controversial story which figured in sixth annual collection. This one is in all points as good as the first and even more shocking. It should certainly give a good reason for reflection to all those who lament the disappearance of "traditional" societies under the influence of Western values...

"Alphas" by Gregory Benford - a good, solid "classical" science-fiction story, in which the hero finds himself inside an alien machine of unimaginable size and power and must find his way out before being reduced to ashes... Frankly, I didn't understand very well the functioning of alien machinery and I did not fully understand how the hero achieved to escape - but I still liked the story!

"At the Rialto" by Connie Willis - that in my modest opinion is the SECOND best story in the anthology. A bunch of world leading authorities on quantum physics meet for their yearly congress in the hotel "Rialto" in Los Angeles to discuss their latest findings - and I am not saying anything more! It is definitely one of the merriest, most brilliant and most clever stories I read in a long time! Towards the end I laughed out loud so hard that tears were running down my face. An absolute jewel!

"Skin deep" by Kathe Koja - a very good story on the "alien sex" theme; a very average man starts an affair with an alien "female" (although frankly, for me, at the end of the story the jury is still out for the question on the precise sex of this alien...); really good SF story, although a little disturbing.

"The egg" by Steven Popkes - a good, solid SF story combined with some social criticism; in a rather distant and definitely gloomy future an orphaned boy is raised by his hard as nails aunt and a mysterious, gentle although physically powerful alien; if it was placed in 1900 and no aliens were involved, you could very well imagine this was written by Jack London. A good read.

"Tales from the Venia Woods" by Robert Silverberg - another bad surprise: The basic idea about the conquest of the whole world by Roman Empire and the survival of this global monarchy for centuries was interesting, but I found this story surprisingly boring, especially coming from such a giant of SF. Finally, the best thing about this story is the title, which refers to a waltz composed by Strauss the son.

"Visiting the dead" by William King - well, this is a good and interesting SF story, with some very dark accents - and with a rather clever ending - about a future society in which people who stayed on Earth are more and more decadent, as opposed to the pioneers colonizing the space...

"Dori Bangs" by Bruce Sterling - without any doubt, for my personal taste this is the WORST story in the collection and this is again a bad surprise, coming from a very gifted writer; also, it is not SF - rather a kind of reflection of how a very small event could change the lifes of two people; my main problem with this story was that both the man and the woman from this story were just two pathetic and uninteresting losers, without any redeeming traits, who just wanted to pass their lifes getting drunk, getting stoned, partying and talking nonsense...

"The ends of the earth" by Lucius Shepard - this is a very good read, but it is definitely not SF - it is however in my personal opinion a very good variation on Lovecraftian themes, although not directly linked to the Cthulhu mythos (do not expect any appearances of "Necronomicon" or "Ia! Cthulhu Fhtagn!" at every page). I liked it very much. Enjoy!

"The price of oranges" by Nancy Kress - a reflection on progress and its price, and also the change and the nostalgy for the times past - but with a rather disgusting ending

"Lottery night" by S.P. Somtow - the THIRD best story in the book; it is not exactly SF, but rather a modern fantastic tale with some (limited) elements of horror and especially a great great deal of humor! In Bangkok, a Thai teenager is going to stay at night in the cemetary, so the shadows of ancestors reveal to him the winning number in the lottery - however he also takes his American friend with him, and that lands them both in a ton of trouble... A wonderful, funny, merry and extremely well written fantastic story!

"A deeper sea" by Alexander Jablokov - a good, honest SF story about the discovery of ways to communicate with dolphins and orcas and its consequences for the whole humankind; not a bad story, although very gloomy; also, the funny part is that it was written in 1989 and it anticipates the rise of Japan and Soviet Union and in the same time a deep decline of USA (China is not even considered worthy mentionning...). Well, we all know how this turned out...)))

"The edge of the world" by Michael Swanwick - a good story, although not exactly SF - rather a modern fantastic tale, about the descent of very special and very very long stairs; I know this may sound boring, but with this quality of writing it is suprisingly appealing! The one bad point is that the three teenager "heroes" are so pathetic and annoying that I stopped caring about what will happen to them around page three...

"Silver lady and the fortyish man" by Megan Lindholm - definitely not SF, but rather a romance story with just the slightest touch of magic - still, an excellent, nice, clever and heartwarming read. Probably more recommanded for girls, but I still enjoyed it.

"The third sex" by Alan Brennert - this is SF mixed with soft porn; the story of a human being who is neither man nor woman - in fact "it" seems to not be of ANY sex ("it" certainly can not reproduce in any way - or can "it"?); or maybe "it" is just the first specimen of the "third sex"? An interesting read, with some rather explicit sexual descriptions.

"Winter on the Belle Fourche" by Neal Barrett, Jr. - again, not SF, but a really well written, interesting and clever western story with just a slightest touch of alternate history; before reading it, it could be a good idea to look up on the internet two people: the poet Emily Dickinson and especially the mountain man John Johnston a.k.a. "Liver Eating" Johnson. The rest, I let you discover yourself! Enjoy!

"Enter a soldier. Later: enter another" by Robert Silverberg - with this one, Robert Silverberg atones completely for the weak previous story in this collection; this is a very good description of the meeting and discussion between Pizarro the conquistador and Socrates the philosopher. A very clever, very interesting story!

"Relationships" by Robert Sampson - absolutely not SF and a rather boring story about a guy who starts seeing the ghosts of women from his past; mercifully it is short.

"Just another perfect day" by John Varley - this is for me the BEST one in the collection, an extremely well written SF story, short, but giving us one surprise per page; a man wakes up and finds himself alone in a locked room with just a letter adressed to him laying on the night table... Enjoy!

"The Loch Moose monster" by Janet Kagan - a very nice, gentle, heartwarming and optimistic SF story about the hard work of scientists and game wardens on a distant planet, to transform the local ecosystem and make it more friendly for the human colonists; a welcome change from the mostly gloomy mood of most SF stories.

"The magic bullet" by Brian Stableford - in the introduction Gardner Dozois promised this to be "an intense and frightening look at a chilling escalation in the age-old War of the Sexes"; and this story delivers fully what was promised!

"The odd old bird" by Avram Davidson - not exactly SF, but a delicious humoristic fantastic adventure of famous Dr Engelbert Eszterhazy, an erudit sleuth living in Scythia-Pannonia-Transbalkania, the fourth largest empire of alternate XIX century Europe. I almost died laughing at the end! Enjoy!

"Great work of time" by John Crowley - this is probably the biggest of the bad surprises; John Crowley is a renowned and gifted author but this long story is so boring that I had all trouble in the world to finish it; it is the story of a secret society which makes subtle changes in the past in order to preserve and expand the British Empire; an excellent idea per se, but surprisingly poorly executed...
---------------
CONCLUSION: after a long hesitation, I decided to rate this collection four stars, but just to be clear - this one is the weakest of the first seven collections yet, inferior to the six previous ones. Nevertheless it is still at a very honest level, worthy buying, reading and keeping.
I Collect them Feb. 10 2014
By Golden San - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love short form SciFi and this collection is a fine addition to my library. The stories are a whos who of Hugo and other award winners and make a fine read.
Seven Books for Seven... Somethings Nov. 6 2012
By John M. Ford - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the seventh volume in the Gardner Dozois Year's Best Science Fiction series. It opens with the expected summation of developments in SF during 1989. Each of the 25 stories is introduced with a concise summary of the author's background and other works. As expected.

Five stories I liked:

Kathe Koja's "Skin Deep" follows a man who takes a great deal for granted in the only close relationship of his life. One day he decides to probe a little deeper.

In Robert Silverberg's "Tales of the Venia Woods" two children find a remnant of the old empire and decide to keep it secret. An easy decision when made in the innocence of childhood.

Nancy Kress's "The Price of Oranges" is a charming time travel tale spun from a grandfather's love for his granddaughter. And his keen sense of the value of a dollar.

Michael Swanwick's "The Edge of the World" is about nothing. A yawning, bottomless abyss captures the imagination of children who live next to it. Then they find the stairs that lead down.

John Varley's "Just Another Perfect Day" is about the value of time and how it slips from our grasp. A man wakes up far in his future to a new life and a very full day.

This is another good collection. Dozois has really hit his stride with this series. Enjoy!
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Fantastic Survey of the Field! July 20 2001
By D. W. Klyve - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Dozois is, and has long been, one of the best editors and anthologizers in all of SF. The anthology ranges over the many different sub-genres of Science Fiction, and I therefore cannot say I enjoyed all of his stories; nevertheless, all were well-written, and some of the stories were among the best I've ever read. I strongly recommend this and any other of Dozois' "Year's Best..." series.


Feedback