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The Year's Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Seventh Annual Collection Paperback – Jul 6 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 688 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; 27th edition (July 6 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312608985
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312608989
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.8 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 771 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #272,907 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

This smorgasbord of thought-provoking fiction ensures that any reader will likely find something appealing. (Publishers Weekly)

Gardner Dozois's long-running "best of" series is rightly a favorite...The Year's Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Seventh Annual Collection, for all its bulk, is charmingly eclectic...Mr. Dozois picks fiction that deserves to be better known to a wide audience. (The Wall Street Journal)

This is a worthy addition to a venerable series. (Publishers Weekly on The Year's Best Science Fiction: Twenty-sixth Annual Collection)

For more than a quarter century, Gardner Dozois's The Year's Best Science Fiction has defined the field. It is the most important anthology, not only annually, but overall. (Charles N. Brown, publisher of Locus Magazine on The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Twenty-sixth Annual Collection)

Review

“[A] worthy addition to a venerable series.”

—PUBLISHERS WEEKLY ON

THE YEAR’S BEST SCIENCE FICTION: TWENTYSIXTH ANNUAL COLLECTION

“A wondrous trove of great stories and an archive that has immeasurable historical significance.”

—ROBERT SILVERBERG

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Norrin Radd on Sept. 24 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This ongoing series always manages to collect many gems, many good stories, and a few less good ones. As usual, Dozois introduces the collection with an eloquent synthesis of the year in science fiction. If you only read one sf anthology this year or every year, this constitutes a substantial choice. The fact that there is one every year insures a certain consistency in content and quality. It is worth looking up the previous volumes as well.
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By John M. Ford TOP 100 REVIEWER on Feb. 20 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Gardner Dozois offers his collection of the best science fiction stories from 2009. As in previous anthologies, he treats readers to a chapter-length summation of developments in the field during 2009, a set of well-chosen stories, and a list of "Honorable Mentions" for further reading. I enjoyed all 32 stories as well as the value-added material.

My five favorite stories are described below.

Alexander Irvine's "Seventh Fall" takes us on the road with a traveling minstrel who earns his way through a post-apocalyptic world performing old plays. He looks for books from the past and for pieces of his own past without much hope of finding either.

Dominic Green's "Butterfly Bomb" takes us to an isolated planet where an old man lives alone with his granddaughter. When a slave ship steals her away, he calls on skills from his youth to attempt a desperate rescue.

Elizabeth Bear and Sarah Monette's "Mongoose" provides an over-the-shoulder view as a professional exterminator and his companion battle a troublesome infestation on board a space station. It shows us what a Pip and Flinx story might be like if written for adults.

Albert Cowdrey's "Paradiso Lost" is an old soldier's letter to the son of a comrade-in-arms about the adventures of his youth and the roots of his cynicism. It has a similar tone to Joe Haldeman's The Forever War.

James Van Pelt's "Solace" tells two stories linked by a candleholder owned at different times by the main character of each. In the past a young man survives a snowstorm while faithfully standing his post.
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As always, Gardner Dozois delivers a wonderful, thought provoking anthology with insightful commentary. I wish I could give this more stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 27 reviews
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
A Good Year's Harvest of Science Fiction July 31 2010
By John M. Ford - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Gardner Dozois offers his collection of the best science fiction stories from 2009. As in previous anthologies, he treats readers to a chapter-length summation of developments in the field during 2009, a set of well-chosen stories, and a list of "Honorable Mentions" for further reading. I enjoyed all 32 stories as well as the value-added material.

My five favorite stories are described below.

Alexander Irvine's "Seventh Fall" takes us on the road with a traveling minstrel who earns his way through a post-apocalyptic world performing old plays. He looks for books from the past and for pieces of his own past without much hope of finding either.

Dominic Green's "Butterfly Bomb" takes us to an isolated planet where an old man lives alone with his granddaughter. When a slave ship steals her away, he calls on skills from his youth to attempt a desperate rescue.

Elizabeth Bear and Sarah Monette's "Mongoose" provides an over-the-shoulder view as a professional exterminator and his companion battle a troublesome infestation on board a space station. It shows us what a Pip and Flinx story might be like if written for adults.

Albert Cowdrey's "Paradiso Lost" is an old soldier's letter to the son of a comrade-in-arms about the adventures of his youth and the roots of his cynicism. It has a similar tone to Joe Haldeman's The Forever War.

James Van Pelt's "Solace" tells two stories linked by a candleholder owned at different times by the main character of each. In the past a young man survives a snowstorm while faithfully standing his post. In the future a young botanist endures the challenges and confusion of repeated awakenings during a colony ship's many centuries of travel.

This collection is highly recommended. My only disappointment was that I had already read five of the stories in David Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer's Year's Best SF 15. The editors of both books are equally responsible for the overlap, but my disappointment falls on this collection because the Kindle version was released so much later in the year.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Best of 2009: Not amazing, but still worthwhile Jan. 19 2011
By Michael Lichter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
If I had been asked to read all of the short science fiction published in English in 2009 and pick the "best" 30 or so pieces, how many of my choices would have been the same as those made by Gardner Dozois for "The Year's Best Science Fiction, 27th Annual Collection"? Well, Dozois selected three stories from his "New Space Opera 2" collection to include in the "Year's Best": "Utriusque Cosmi" by Robert Charles Wilson, "Events Preceding the Helvetican Renaissance" by John Kessel, and "The Island" by Peter Watts. While Wilson's story is impressive for its scope and craftsmanship and Watts' fairly conventional piece did win the 2010 Hugo for best novelette, all of the three were among my *least* favorite selections from "New Space Opera 2". Based on the evidence at hand, I wouldn't have picked any of the same stories. Hm.

Nevertheless, virtually all of the stories included in this volume are good or very good, and only one (John C. Wright's highly mannered mythpunk story "Twilight of the Gods") was truly unreadable. My observations and comments are as follows:

1. An unusually high proportion of the stories are either set in worlds that the authors have previously written about or appear to be designed mainly to set the scene for later stories. Paul J. McAuley's "Crimes and Glory," for example, concerns the theft of alien technology on the colony world Port of Plenty, about which McAuley has written previously, and refers to events in earlier stories set there. "Mongoose" by Elizabeth Bear and Sarah Monette takes place in the same universe of organic spaceships as 2008's "Boojum". Paul Cornell's "One of Our Bastards is Missing" is set in the same steampunkish alternate universe as his earlier "Catherine Drewe," where pre-WWI European colonial powers have mastered space travel and other advanced technologies. On the other hand, Alexander Irvine's "Seventh Fall", which follows a postapocalyptic search for a copy of "Hamlet" (evoking both "Davy" and "The Book of Eli"), reads more like the first chapter of a novel than a standalone story. Chris Roberson's "Edison's Frankenstein," takes place in an intriguing (and very race/culture/religion-conscious) steampunkish alternate world where power from "promethium" has made electricity irrelevant, but barely makes sense except as the first chapter of a novel.

2. A substantial fraction of the stories are set in developing countries in the near future. I often detect condescension, romanticism, and especially exoticism in these tales, which typically exploit the wonder in seeing, as Dozois says, "ancient customs and dazzlingly sophisticated high tech exist[ing] side by side." Lavie Tidhar's "The Integrity of the Chain", which is set in Laos, does little beyond drawing out this contrast. The other stories are less exoticist, especially "Infinities" by Vandana Singh, which centers on the friendship between two Indian mathematicians, one Muslim and one Hindu, during a period of communal violence, and "Three Leaves of Aloe" by Rand B. Lee, where the Indian setting is mostly irrelevant to the story of a mother contemplating the implantation of a behavior-modifying "nanny chip" in her unruly daughter. Geoff Ryman's "Blocked", which begins in Cambodia, is a poignant and unusual but frustratingly sketchy story narrated by an uplifted animal who marries a human woman and struggles to live up to his image of what a man should be. Ian McDonald's novella "Vishnu at the Cat Circus", arguably the best piece in the collection, is set in the same future India as his "River of Gods". While the cat circus is an annoying literary device (yes, there is a cat circus), this is a compelling story of rivalry between elite Indian siblings, one a gifted engineer who pursues technological augmentation of the human intellect, one a gene-modified genius who builds a behind-the-scenes career in politics, and the third an unmodified human who seeks to ensure that the common people don't get left too far behind. Concerns about the global poor being left behind are also central to Adam Roberts' story "Hair", which is much more attentive than McDonald's novella to the conflicting interests of rich and poor.

3. My favorites among stories not yet mentioned included John Barnes' "Things Undone," where the central characters are time cops in a socially backwards but scientifically advanced present; Maureen McHugh's "Useless Things," one of her typically subtle stories about a woman living in post-collapse New Mexico; and "Lion Walk" by Mary Rosenblum, in which a woman attempts to solve a set of murders that take place in a Jurassic Park-like setting.

4. Without getting into questions of story selection, there are a couple of things Dozois could do to improve these collections. First, he could provide more context when introducing individual stories (like, "this story is set in the universe that Bear and Monette introduced in 'Boojum'") and some indication of why he thought the stories were among the year's best. In this volume, Dozois' typical story introduction consists of a paragraph-long author bio and a single summary sentence. Second, Dozois could devote the first few pages of his volume introduction to some comments about the stories in the volume and some observations about general currents in the genre. In contrast, his introduction to this volume, "Summation: 2009", is a long (30 pp.), detailed account of doings in the industry, including lists of new anthologies, lists of sales figures, bulletins about new 'zines and old ones that are folding, box office figures for sci-fi movies, and obituaries for authors, editors, and actors associated with the field, and is unlikely to be interesting to any but industry insiders.

Bottom line: Although I might not have picked any of these stories as the best of the year had I read the hundreds of stories Dozois sifted through, this is nevertheless a worthwhile collection with several very good pieces and hardly any chaff.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
As always, an excellent read and great value for your money Aug. 21 2010
By Erin Keiser - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Every year I look forward to the new Year's Best Science Fiction coming out, and every year I am very happy with the new edition. This year was no different, and if anything I felt that this year was the best edition in 5 years.

My favorite story was Butterfly Bomb, but there were at least 10 stories in this year's edition that were memorable. I am a big fan of Space Opera, so I already had read Events Preceding the Helvetican Renaissance fromThe New Space Opera 2 but otherwise the stories were fresh and interesting.

There was much more varied plot lines this year than in years past, and it was good to see a few uplifting stories amongst the normal dystopian futures I have grown accustomed to reading in this anthology. All in all, this is a must have for science fiction lovers, and people looking for a great short story anthology.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3,5 stars collection with Enceladus hike, space Cheshire cat, hydroponic aspens and giant Space Marines-SF in Year of Grace 2009 Sept. 1 2014
By Maciej - Published on Amazon.com
For this collection Gardner Dozois selected SF stories which he considered as best amongst those published in 2009. The one from previous year was very honest - this one is slightly weaker.

As in earlier anthologies, for this one Gardner Dozois selected stories which he considered as the best or most important of the given year. This collection includes also an overview of what happened in SF (largely understood) in 2009, including the death of great writers Philip Jose Farmer, J.G. Ballard and William Tenn. At the end there is also the very useful section of "honourable mentions" - stories which couldn't be selected for this collection because of lack of space (and this is already a HUGE book!), but which were also of good quality.

Six stories were VERY GOOD: "Under the shouting sky", "Crimes and glory", "Infinities", "Mongoose", "Solace", "Twilight of the Gods".

On another hand for my personal taste there were this time seven stinkers: "Seventh fall", "Things undone", "The integrity of the chain", "It takes two", "Blocked", "Hair", "Vishnu at the cat circus".

The remaining stories range from good (10) to readable (9).

As in previous years depressed and pessimistic mood dominated in most of those stories. There was only one amongst them ("Solace") in which we could find exhilarating joy usually associated (at least for me) with the exploration of new possibilities, new horizons, new discoveries, new knowledge. If Gardner Dozois selection is a representative sample it means modern SF is written by a bunch of terminal cancer patients for a public made of masochists enjoying chronic depression. Linked to the previous point, there is also an almost absolute lack of humour in those series.

It also seems that most of modern SF writers do not try to anticipate what will happen in the future but simply run after recent world developments – in this collection the topic of financial crisis and pandering to global warming hysteria are two dominant trends. Also, the "revenge of the nerds" and left winged politics factors are still very much present in this Gardner Dozois selection: military, corporations, police, rich people, capitalism and US government are responsible of all evil on Earth and in space and scientific and technological progress, far from solving any problems, in fact just makes everything worse... I must say that this bias showed by the editor year after year after year really rubs me in the wrong way…
Below, more of my impressions about every story, with some limited SPOILERS:
-------------------------------------------------------
"Utriusque cosmi" by Robert Charles Wilson – a young girl who already lived a lot (and badly) is abducted by aliens, minutes before Earth is destroyed by a mysterious Enemy…; the action of this story plays on a huge scale, both in time and in space… I really can't say that I cared a lot for the final solution of the whole mystery, but objectively speaking, this is a GOOD, well written story.

"A story, with beans" by Steven Gould – in a near future, somewhere on the Mexican-USA border, a group of college students travels into a forbidden territory, looking to study local metal eating fauna (or is it flora?)… Their local guides treat them to a camp fire story (with beans)… Well written, but including (of course) an obligatory dump on religion and an obligatory (of course) US government routinely targeting and exterminating defenceless civilians (sigh)… I am so tired of finding all the time this kind of things in Dozois anthologies… Still, a READABLE story.

"Under the shouting sky" by Karl Bunker – on Enceladus (one of Saturn's moons), in a relatively near future, two astronauts are in trouble, BIG TIME! While trying to survive they make a shocking discovery. A short but powerful "nuts and bolts" old style VERY GOOD story!

"Events preceding the Helvetican Renaissance" by John Kessel – a kind of future monk serving a terminally weird cult goes on a most secret mission on a hostile planet. Well written, but with an ultimately disappointing, impossibly clichéd ending. Still, a READABLE story.

"Useless things" by Maureen F. McHugh – that is hardly SF at all, as it is in fact just a story about a lonely woman trying to make a living in hard times in a near future in USA in which the 2008 crisis didn't end but went on and on and on… Very well written, as usual with this author – but also depressing. Still, a GOOD story.

"Black swan" by Bruce Sterling – a really, really, REALLY strange but mostly amusing alternate history story about Europe (in fact more than one Europe) in which French president Nicolas Sarkozy (who was in 2009 still in the office) have chosen a very different and surprising career. Some basic knowledge of French and European politics in the beginning of XXI century helps understanding this strange but READABLE story better.

"Crimes and glory "by Paul J. McAuley – this 40 pages long novella is part of the Jakaroo series, in which humanity sold most of Solar System to aliens receiving in exchange the use of a network of wormholes to travel between stars. This story is a distant sequel to the excellent "City of the dead" which figured in 2008 anthology – and it manages to stay on the same level of excellence. Mixing a criminal investigation and a kind of "space opera" chase in space this is a VERY GOOD thing, one of the best stories in 2009 collection.

"Seventh fall" by Alexander Irvine – a post-apocalyptic story about wandering actors, which is in fact just another pretext to take a gigantic dump on religion. I didn't like this routine exercise in anti-Christian bigotry at all. AVOID.

"Butterfly bomb" by Dominic Green – seemingly, it is about a kind of old hermit living on a distant planet alone with his daughter – but soon, we realise that in reality nothing in this story is simple and nothing is really what it first looks like. It is an interesting thing, with some good dialogs and good ideas – but I found the ending weak. Still, a GOOD story.

"Infinities" by Vandana Singh – in India, in the middle of religious troubles between Hindu and Muslims lives an old, pious, generous, humble and extremely gifted Muslim mathematician, who didn't have a very happy life and whose one of few happier moments come when he can work on his lifelong research project or/and meet his old Hindu friend. Then disaster strikes… This is a VERY GOOD, brilliantly written story, with a very touching human portrait. If only at least once Gardner Dozois could select for one of his anthologies just one story in which we can meet a similarly pious, devout and likeable Christian – but we will sooner see religious peace in India that this kind of miracle…

"Things undone" by John Barnes – this ABOMINATION is only 29 pages long but every paragraph was a struggle to go through so it seemed to be longer than "War and peace"… Author described a kind of alternate timeline freakishly weird reality so complex, so chaotic and so full of terms which are never explained, that I completely couldn't understand what this thing was about and after 20 pages I simply gave up. AVOID AS PLAGUE!

"On the human plan" by Jay Lake – a very strange story about the last moments of Earth, as the Sun itself is dying. Humanity disappeared eons ago, but some creatures (AIs?) still remain on the ruins of the planet. Can't say that I understood what it was really about but unlike the previous long winded abomination this much shorter and better written story had some kind charm. A READABLE thing.

"The island" by Peter Watts – a crew of human space workers travels through the Universe since many mllions of years, executing a project of incredible scale. They sleep most of the time waking up only for brief periods of work and private time. Their coordinator/ captain/ mortal enemy is an AI. One day they find something completely unexpected… A well written thing, although with plot holes of galactical proportions and also a strange and by moments unpleasant (I cannot be specific as it would give too big a SPOILER), funny tasting treat, with one BIG TWIST which I didn't see coming at all… Summa summarum, I rate this as a GOOD story.

"The integrity of the chain" by Lavie Tidhar – a weird short story about.. well, I cannot really say what it is about, except that it seems to happen in Thailand and the hero is a Lao refugee working as an auto-rickshaw (tuk tuk) driver. A low quality story – its shortness is its only redeeming quality. AVOID.

"Lion walk" by Mary Rosenblum – in a nature reserve in USA scientists are recreating creatures from Pleistocene; one day the chief game warden of the reserve, a very likeable and very tough lady named Tahira, discovers that a horrible crime was committed on the grounds… This is a GOOD, interesting, well written story but I didn't like two things. First, author assumes that in the future in USA middle level civil servants will be protected from justice, even if they are responsible of most serious offenses. Secondly, why decide that a successful woman game warden must have a dog-like sense of smell just because she was born in Africa… I am not the most "progressist" or "politically correct" person, but this kind of casual racism rubs even me in a wrong way…

"Escape to other worlds with science fiction" by Jo Walton – in an alternate reality, somewhere in the 40s, the Great Depression is still raging – and a poor, struggling waitress, will be offered a Faustian deal… I didn't care much for the politics underlying the main story, but I must admit that it is a well written and very shocking GOOD story. .

"Three leaves of aloe" by Rand B. Lee – in a near future India a single mother faces a great dilemma after her teenage daughter gets in trouble big time at school… Well written and interesting, even if a little bit preachy… Still, a GOOD story.

"Mongoose" by Elizabeth Bear and Sarah Monette – without question THE BEST STORY IN THE COLLECTION! It is a kind of sequel to the excellent "Boojum" by the same two authors, which figured in 2008 collection and is EVEN BETTER! A highly recommended space pest exterminator comes to a space station to fight an infestation – he is accompanied by Mongoose, a terribly dangerous alien creature who is in the same time his main tool of trade, his pet and his only friend. This story very cleverly mixes SF adventure with Alice in the Wonderland, Winnie the Pooh, Lovecraftian mythos and also, last but not least, one of my absolutely most beloved Rudyard Kipling short stories "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi". A TREASURE! TO READ ABSOLUTELY!

"Paradiso lost" by Albert E. Cowdrey – this is a kind of prequel to "The tribes of Bela", an earlier and better novella by the same author. In a distant future humanity wages war against aliens and one of more distant outposts, called Paradiso, must be evacuated. A military expedition is launched in order to achieve this and this novella tells the story of this dangerous mission, as told much later by a veteran officer who made it back. The story is not half bad, but I was shocked by the image of this future military painted by the author – especially when he describes women soldiers as routinely prostituting themselves to their male counterparts to earn extra money and female officers also routinely sleep with soldiers under their command… And that is not even the worst thing… Also, I didn't really like the ending. Hence I rate this initially very promising story only as GOOD.

"It takes two" by Nicola Griffith – if I understood correctly this story, it is about a cross dressing lesbian woman who pretends to be a man to speed up her career and who then one day finds herself in an uncomfortable situation in a night club… But on another hand I may be wrong because this darn thing is completely confusing. I didn't finish this unpleasant story and my advice is to simply skip it, as it is just soft lesbian porn, not any kind of SF. AVOID.

"Blocked" by Geoff Ryman – aliens approach the Earth, probably with hostile intentions, and humanity goes very literally underground… In this story we perceive this exodus through the eyes of somebody who seem not to be fully human, although he is part of human society… My problem is that I couldn't understand really WHAT EXACTLY is the hero of this story – also most of the story didn't make sense at all. AVOID.

"Solace" by James Van Pelt – surprise, surprise. A story about space exploration which is full of optimism and hope and all this inspired by the work and labours of a believing Christian (a former catholic monk) from older times. A VERY GOOD STORY and a recommended reading.

"Act one" by Nancy Kress – as it is frequently the case with Nancy Kress stories, when she sends her heroes in space, she reaches stellar level of quality but if she leaves them on Earth, then she produces much weaker things. In this story, slightly similar in the general tone to "Beggars in Spain" (a better thing) we have a reflection about normality and handicap and also human engineering, as told from the point of view of a gifted but profoundly unhappy small person (a man suffering from dwarfism to be clear). Even if it has some interesting moments, I found this story only READABLE.

"Twilight of the gods" by John C. Wright – the SECOND BEST STORY IN THE COLLECTION, in which we have Wagnerian mythos and also a little tiny bit of Tolkien adapted to a grandiose "space opera". The Acting Captain of an immense but very badly damaged space battleship desperately looks for the cursed Ring of Command which, according to legends, can unlock the half-legendary Main Computer. EXTREMELY BEAUTIFULLY WRITTEN! To read absolutely!

"Blood dauber" by Ted Kosmatka and Michael Poore – a hard working but financially struggling guy who works at a zoo discovers a strangely looking insect larva in a shipment of exotic fruits; in the same time he must supervise a strange man who was sentenced to community service at the zoo and also struggle to save his marriage. This is actually social drama, with just the slightest little touch of SF in it - but I liked it nevertheless. A well written, GOOD story.

"This wind blowing, and this tide" by Damien Broderick – a weird and slightly unpleasant story about a very obese Korean man who is also a kind of psychic. He was hired to help explore the wreckage of an extremely ancient alien spaceship on Titan – but is this spaceship actually alien? The general idea behind the story was not bad, but still, I didn't really like this thing. At best READABLE.

"Hair" by Adam Roberts – a really stupid story about a guy who wanted to eradicate poverty by changing people physically (I cannot enter in the details). As the whole idea is unpleasant, the main hero is a total @hole and the conclusion is abysmally stupid, I didn't' like this thing at all. AVOID!

"Before my last breath" by Robert Reed – one day the DEFINITE proof of alien visit on Earth is made and people study this find intensely. Unusually, this time this most excellent author produced a disappointing thing, in which an alien race, which was able to cross the distance between stars is portrayed as a bunch of real sissies… READABLE – but really, really, REALLY stupid.

"One of our bastards is missing" by Paul Cornell – an interesting kind of steam punk alternate reality tale in which a British royal marriage is threatened by a Prussian plot of most sinister nature…))) This is a GOOD albeit very silly story - it even includes Vatican as a great power thanks mostly to its highly trained Jesuits assassins…)))

"Edison's Frankenstein" by Chris Roberson – in a world in which a better, cheaper substitute to electricity was found early in XIX century, Thomas Alva Edison and Nikola Tesla were forced to choose other, quite surprising career paths… A silly story, but READABLE.

"Erosion" by Ian Creasey – a guy transformed for the needs of a long space travel to another solar system makes a nostalgia trip to say good bye to Earth – and also test his new body. Both those things will turn quite bad… A READABLE story.

"Vishnu at the cat circus" by Ian McDonald – this author had a long winning streak with stories situated in a future high-tech India; this cycle began with "Little Goddess" but with this story it ended – in a rather brutal way. This long winded life story of a guy who once was a kind of super-man before ending on the street as owner and manager of the only cat circus in the world, was the first part of the "high-tech India" cycle I was unable to finish, as it bored me almost to death. Only the first pages are readable – the rest is trash. AVOID!
---------------------------
CONCLUSION: a 3,5 stars collection, inferior to those from previous two years, but still worth buying, especially for the six stories which are very good and the ten which are good (out of a total of 32).
10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
rambling tales Oct. 11 2010
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Many of the stories in this book were long-winded and pointless. Most were depressing. The few gems just didn't make up for the stories that you wished weren't there.


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