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Yes, Virginia [Explicit Lyrics]

Dresden Dolls Audio CD
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 13.36 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Yes, Virginia + Dresden Dolls + Who Killed Amanda Palmer
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Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


1. Sex Changes
2. Backstabber
3. Modern Moonlight
4. My Alcoholic Friends
5. Delilah
6. Dirty Business
7. First Orgasm
8. Mrs. O
9. Shores Of California
10. Necessary Evil
11. Mandy Goes To Med School
12. Me & The Minibar
13. Sing

Product Description

Product Description

The continued buzz -and a fanbase that grows exponentially as the band tours- is setting the stage for sheer Doll-Mania when their sophomore album Yes, Virginia is unleashed on the public. While the instrumentation lives up to that of their debut, the band took more of a rock approach to the recording process this time around. On this album, The Dresden Dolls came out with something very modern yet totally unique, taking the world stage and tearing down the curtain particularly in their stunning lead single, 'Sing'. They rip holes in the veneer of rock music and create their own rules, rhyme and reason. Yes, Virginia is a one-hour outburst that captures this notion; never pretty, never laminated...The Dresden Dolls provide a real-life soundtrack fit for bewildered children of all ages. Roadrunner. 2006.

Product Description

Japanese pressing adds 2 bonus tracks ''Lonesome Organist Rapes Page Turner' & 'Two-Headed Boy'. Roadrunner. 2006.

Customer Reviews

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4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars And now for something totally different June 16 2006
By Amanda Richards HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
You'll need to keep an open mind for this one, but The Dresden Dolls are the most excitingly different duo that I've come across in ages. Only the brave would start an album with a song about a sex-change, but this after all is punk cabaret, and wonderfully clever and entertaining. You'll see what I mean in the lyrics from the first track:

"No second thoughts the knife is nearing

You'll never hear the little pitter patter pitter patter

Of this little feat of engineering"

First single "Sing" is the last track on the album, and although not the best song on the album lyrically it's certainly ear catching. Other good tracks are "Backstabber"; "Modern Moonlight"; my personal pick "My Alcoholic Friends"; "Necessary Evil" and "Mandy Goes to Med School" where Amanda Palmer sings:

"I've been feeling dull as a coat hanger

Pretty as a picture of a patient on a fresh iv

Giddy as a gangbanger with a set of sutures where his magic johnson ought to be"

Give this to someone with weird musical tastes and they WILL believe that there is a Santa Claus after all.

Amanda Richards
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4.0 out of 5 stars ... there ARE Dresden Dolls May 16 2006
By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAME TOP 10 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
Only a brave band would have a gleeful song about a sex change as the FIRST song of their sophomore album. Well, that says something about the Dresden Dolls.

This wild, Tim-Burtonesque band created a stir with their debut album a few years back, and now the cabaret-rockers are back with "Yes Virginia." It's catchy. It's kitschy. It's dark and cutting, even as the Dresden Dolls refine their signature sound into ever more potent music.

It opens with a rippling piano line, but it slowly grows darker and more twisted... until the drums kick in. Amanda Palmer begins gleefully singing the ode of an apprehensive sex-change patient: "Dear Mr. and/or Mrs. Sender/We're pleased to inform you that your applications been accepted/Starting from the time you get this letter/Your life will be one never-ending 'hope you're feeling better'...."

From there on, the band launches from piano-punk to raucous pop, even trying out the sunny sound, which is belied by the underlying dark lyrics. Fortunately after that they return to the more bombastic, twisted sound that they do best. The best of all would have to be "Dirty Business," with its barbed lyrics ("She's the kind of girl who only asks you over when its raining/Just to make you lie there catching water dripping from the ceiling.")

But the Dolls also explore different kinds of music in this album. Right in the middle they try out some quieter songs, such the sprawling, lazy sound of "My Alcoholic Friends". Not to mention the the lonely prettiness of masturbation ballad "First Orgasm" (not recommended for small children, if the title didn't tip you off).

With face paint and drums'n'piano music, the Dresden Dolls really do come across as a gimmick band. At first.
Read more ›
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5.0 out of 5 stars Punk-cabaret at it's best July 6 2011
By G. Larouche TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
This is not an album for the faint-hearted! The Dresden Dolls are not shy, and Amanda Palmer's twisted, often vitriolic lyrics can shock, but the duo's talent is undeniable. There is a wonderful synergy between Amanda's piano and Brian Vigglione's drums. They sound more confident on this album than on their self-titled debut (also excellent, mind you), a band at their creative peak!

The Dresden Dolls are not for everyone. As hinted, the songs' subject-matters are often very unusual, confessional and down-right creepy. If you like dark and strange stuff, have an adventurous musical ear, then get this album, along with the band's other wonderful work, and Miss Palmer's solo efforts. You won't regret it!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  60 reviews
45 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than the debut April 22 2006
By Daniel Maltzman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Boston's The Dresden Dolls seemed to come out of left field when their self-titled debut album began picking up steam via word-of-mouth and when "coin-operated boy" became a cult hit. Their wholly unique brand of theatrics, cabaret and dark confessionals was a refreshing change of pace.

With a cult classic under their belt, the Boston duo, made up of Amanda Palmer (piano, organ, mellotron) and Brian Viglione (drums, guitar, bass) are in a bit of a bind. What do they do for a follow-up? How can they make another captivating collection of songs, in a similar vein of avant-garde cabaret, without rehashing the debut? Luckily for The Dresden Dolls, with "Yes Virginia," (2006) the band make a sophomore album that takes up where the debut left off, yet also has its own signature and doesn't merely try to capture the style and spirit of its predecessor.

Compared to the self-titled debut, "Yes, Virginia" sounds more vigorous, and the album overall has more of a "rock" feel, yet without losing its theatrical, cabaret backbone. The duo sound sure of themselves and in their element. Palmer is kind of hard to figure out. Sometimes she seems to mock the subjects in her songs (dirty business), sometimes seems to hate them, (backstabber) or shows sympathy (Delilah). Other times it's hard to know if Palmer is being sarcastic, ironic, or sincere. Sometimes it's hard to know when she's wearing the theatrical mask or if she's being herself. While the album is theatrical in nature, at times Palmer seems to break out of her theatrical persona, such as with the candid and sincere "Delilah" and the beautiful, lush "sing" in which Palmer states "life is no cabaret." This makes "Yes, Virginia," a more three-dimensional album compared to the debut.

It took the Dresden Dolls three years to come up with a sophomore album and by listening to these songs you can clearly see why. The band didn't just use scraps or b-sides, but rather meticulously crafted their new body of work. It's obvious to the listener that each song on "Yes, Virginia" is a labor of love.
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars this band fights dirty! April 18 2006
By Keith Shelton - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The Dresden Dolls deserve credibility simply because they push the envelope. That was proven on their debut album. Take a listen to Girl Anachronism and you'll see that this band is taking music new places.

The debut was a wonderful album for fans of the piano and introduced me to the world of punk caberet music, however the casual listener would probably write the band off as too expiremental and not grabbing enough for radio play.

With Yes, Virginia, The Dresden Dolls have retained their unique sound but have made the music bigger, catchier, and more appealing to a wide audience.

The album highlights have to be Backstabber and Dirty Business. Both would likely do well on alternative radio with their catchy piano riffs and lyrics that will really open your eyes. Especially on Dirty Business with the line "she's the kind of girl who leaves out condoms on the bedroom dresser, just to make you jealous of the men she f***ed before you met her" brutal!

Shores Of California is another standout, talking about relationships with lyrics that beg to be sung along to, can't wait to hear that track live!

They aren't afraid to speak their mind either as evidenced on First Orgasm or the controversial Mrs. O, 2 tracks that i'm sure will keep the album banned from stores like walmart, but that's probably a good thing.

For a band that doesn't consist of anything more than a Piano and drums, the tracks are huge, your brain won't even realize that there is only 2 instruments being playing here. You could even dance or mosh to half the tracks on this album, something that would seem impossible for a piano fronted band.

I will come out and name Yes, Virginia as one of the most innovative albums of the last 15 years. This album has to put The Dresden Dolls in the spotlight and give them their due. Check it out and be amazed.
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Record Company is screwing Amanda over Sept. 7 2009
By Device Consumer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
If you're a fan of Amanda Palmer,
please buy direct from HER website,
or in person at one of her shows.
The record company is withholding all profits if you buy
anywhere other than directly from her.
Please repost this review anywhere her products are sold
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars And now for something totally different May 19 2006
By Amanda Richards - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
You'll need to keep an open mind for this one, but The Dresden Dolls are the most excitingly different duo that I've come across in ages. Only the brave would start an album with a song about a sex-change, but this after all is punk cabaret, and wonderfully clever and entertaining. You'll see what I mean in the lyrics from the first track:

"No second thoughts the knife is nearing

You'll never hear the little pitter patter pitter patter

Of this little feat of engineering"

First single "Sing" is the last track on the album, and although not the best song on the album lyrically it's certainly ear catching. Other good tracks are "Backstabber"; "Modern Moonlight"; my personal pick "My Alcoholic Friends"; "Necessary Evil" and "Mandy Goes to Med School" where Amanda Palmer sings:

"I've been feeling dull as a coat hanger

Pretty as a picture of a patient on a fresh iv

Giddy as a gangbanger with a set of sutures where his magic johnson ought to be"

Give this to someone with weird musical tastes and they WILL believe that there is a Santa Claus after all.

Amanda Richards, May 19, 2006
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent, should be 4 1/2 stars April 24 2006
By scott s - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The Boston-based Dresden Dolls have a unique sound commonly referred to as punk cabaret, and that's an accurate description, given the tenacity with which keyboardist Amanda Palmer and drummer Brian Viglione attack their instruments. They're also frequently compared to the White Stripes, which isn't accurate at all, since the bands have little in common except for each having two members (though the Dolls poked fun at this comparison on last summer's tour by dressing at the Stripes and performing "My Doorbell" at some shows.) It's a good bet the Dresden Dolls won't have to deal with such lazy comparisons for much longer, because everyone is likely to know who they are after the release of Yes, Virginia, a collection of theatrical songs with plenty of attitude and unfailingly gripping lyrics, including as many clever one-liners as you'd find on a Ludacris album.

Palmer's vocal delivery is captivating throughout the record, with her deliberate enunciation of each syllable and the way she switches between singing and talking as she performs the voices of different characters. Viglione provides exactly what's needed for each song, from the frenzied drumming of "Modern Moonlight" to the subtle cymbals of "First Orgasm", to songs that combine both elements, like "Sex Changes," a standout track that isnt about an operation but rather the aftermath of losing ones virginity. The opening line of that song -- "Dear Mr. and/or Mrs. Sender" -- provides a fitting introduction to the off-kilter lyrics that are Palmer's trademark.

One of the strengths of Palmer's words is that, though they are deeply intelligent and thoughtful, they're always easily accessible. It doesn't take a lot of digging to discover the meaning of the songs, which is usually something fairly universal. "First Orgasm" is an updated version of "She Bop" for the brokenhearted and depressed. It's a stark portrait of a lonely morning at home, which concludes with Palmer twice pleading, "Won't you hold me?" "Me and the Minibar" has a similar theme, except the setting is a hotel room at night. And then there's one of the album's most obviously cabaret-sounding tracks, "My Alcoholic Friends," which focuses on the negative (and some of the positive) effects of being a boozehound.

"Backstabber" is a 4-minute litany of insults aimed at some unknown critic, apparently a jealous member of another band. Palmer wails, "Failure has made you so cruel" and "you only sleep with girls who say they like your music," then adds with indignation, "Don't tell me not to reference my songs within my songs." Viglione's rare appearance on background vocals suggests he is eager to join in the bashing as well.

For all of her venom and sometimes-frightening intensity, Palmer has a sharp wit. "Shores of California" examines the eternal relationship troubles men and women encounter due to their different priorities, "and thats why God made escort agencies, One Life to Live and mace and GHB," Palmer sings, before ultimately observing, "All around the nation, the girls are crying and the boys are masturbating."

The only misstep (and it's not a serious one) is "Sing," which is literally about the joys of singing. It has a pleasant melody and positive message, but it's also pretty lame for a band known for PG-13 and sometimes R-rated subject matter.

Despite their lyrical edginess, most of these songs have surprisingly mainstream melodies, which can only help to expand the duo's fan base. Yes, Virginia, it is possible to become rock stars in the year 2006 performing creative cabaret pop music.
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