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New York Times Cookbook Hardcover – Apr 1 1990


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New York Times Cookbook + James Beard's American Cookery + Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 800 pages
  • Publisher: Cookbooks; Revised edition edition (April 1 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060160101
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060160104
  • Product Dimensions: 18.7 x 3.9 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #75,018 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joseph H Pierre on Feb. 4 2001
Format: Hardcover
I'm one of those men who like to cook sometimes, for the fun of it. Cooking can be as creative as any other art, and recipes are often adaptable. Substitutions of ingredients and addition or subtraction of other ingredients or changed amounts are up to the cook, according to their own taste requirements or simply to see what new taste results.

This is a good cookbook. I have used it over the years, and some of the recipes are old standbys that I return to frequently. For example, on page 299 is an excellent recipe for chili con carne. I substitute sirloin or stew meat cut into approximately 1" cubes for the chopped beef. I also like to throw in an extra red pepper just for color, and sometimes lighten up on the chili powder, depending on the taste of those I'm cooking for. My 96-year-old mother-in-law loves my chili, but likes it a little milder. For those who like it hot, adding a few jalapenos will wake up the taste buds and make the eyeballs sweat. Chili was originally made without beans, until the Great Depression era, when beans were added to add bulk cheaply. Hamburger as a substitute for top grade beef was also an economy measure that has become synonymous with chili. I retain the beans for the flavor, but revert to the original use of prime beef as the meat ingredient.

Another recipe from the book that has proven popular with my friends and family is the one for Nova Scotia Black Fruitcake, on page 699. It has become a family tradition for me to make it every Christmas. I make it with brandy usually, adding the booze over a period of a month or so unsparingly, keeping it moist while it ages, wrapped in cheesecloth in a cool room. It is delicious.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joanna Daneman on March 1 2001
Format: Hardcover
I have both Joy of Cooking and the NYT Cookbook, and I have to say that the NYT cookbook is our kitchen bible. The recipes are basic, like chili and pot roasts, yet somehow a cut above the average kitchen standards. So this is the one I reach for when entertaining or just figuring out what to make for dinner.
The sour cream fudge cake is our favorite dessert in the book. This simple yet unbelievably good cake doesn't even need icing and is just the thing for bringing to a party. Again, this is the kind of recipe in the book; standard chocolate cake, yet better in every way than other recipes we've tried.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Vorlauf on Dec 29 2002
Format: Hardcover
New York has been the epicenter of world cuisine for some time and this is a classic referance for that cuisine. Not the most modern, or the simplest, or the most complete but a balance of all that is good in food. Like "The Joy of Cooking" or "How to Cook Almost Everything" this book can serve as a basis for learning all the classic recipes and techniques of western and some asian and American cooking. If you want to own just one cookbook, this may well be the one to own.
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By Adam Shah on Sept. 7 2002
Format: Hardcover
I have several cookbooks, but this one has the most stains in it by far, which is probably the best way to determine if a cookbook is any good. I turn to the Times cookbook when I want to make my old standbys, when I am trying something new or when I have company coming over. Of course, I was raised by a mother who used an older edition of this book as her main cookbook, so I may be a bit biased.
The cookbook has everything out there you need to start cooking. When I first started cooking, I was able to pick up this cookbook and start with almost no background. All the recipes turned out excellent. I particularly liked the chili recipes.
Last year, I mixed and matched these recipes with ones typed on index cards that I inherited from my grandmother and made a successful Thanksgiving dinner (which may be the ultimate praise for a cookbook).
One warning: recipes in this cookbook are not shortcuts. They will take a decent time to prepare. If I am in a hurry, I don't usually use this cookbook. If you never have much time to prepare a meal or do not enjoy cooking, this is probably not the book for you.
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By A Customer on Feb. 9 2001
Format: Hardcover
This cookbook will serve you for many years.
It offers indispensable advise on common cooking issues as well as many many excellent recipes that will become regulars in your house.
Since it was first published in 1961, The New York Times Cook Book, a standard work for gourmet home cooks, has sold nearly three million copies in all editions and continues to sell strongly each year. All the nearly fifteen hundred recipes in the book have been reviewed, revised, and updated, and approximately 40 percent have been replaced.
Emphasizing the timeless nature of this collection, Craig Claiborne has included new recipes using fresh herbs and food processor techniques. He has also added more Chinese, Indian, and foreign recipes and more recipes for pasta, rice, and grains. Additional fish recipes, new salads and bread recipes, and an exceptional chili dish enhance this edition, which contains traditional American recipes and selected recipes from twenty countries. All the recipes are clearly presented and suitable for many different occasions, ranging from a wide variety of family meals to the most formal dinner party. The author also covers sauces and salad dressings, relishes, and preserves. And there are countless old favorites and those wonderful desserts.
Complete with essential cross-referencing, a table of equivalents and conversions, and an index, the revised edition of The New York Times Cook Book is a superb new cookbook to give, to own, and to use for years to come.
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