Your Baby's First Year: Third Edition and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Your Baby's First Year: Third Edition on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Your Baby's First Year: Third Edition [Mass Market Paperback]

American Academy Of Pediatrics
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 9.99
Price: CDN$ 9.49 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
You Save: CDN$ 0.50 (5%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Monday, September 22? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition CDN $8.34  
Paperback --  
Mass Market Paperback CDN $9.49  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

May 25 2010
 
THE ONE GUIDE MOST PEDIATRICIANS RECOMMEND
 
From the American Academy of Pediatrics—the nation’s most trusted name in child care—Your Baby’s First Year is the definitive all-in-one guide to caring for your infant. Revised and updated, including two new chapters on sleep and allergies, Your Baby’s First Year provides authoritative advice on all aspects of infant care, including
 
• expanded sections on raising twins, multiples, and children with autism
• new material on prebiotics, probiotics, and the Tdap vaccine
• a month-to-month guide to your baby’s first year with vital facts on growth, behavior, and development
• a complete health encyclopedia covering illnesses, injuries, and disabilities
• advice on breastfeeding, bottle-feeding, and introducing solids
• guidelines for choosing a child care provider
• safety checks for home and car, including a car safety seat shopping guide
• And much more
 
    Comprehensive, reassuring, and up-to-date, Your Baby’s First Year is an indispensable guide for all parents who want to provide the very best care for their baby.

Frequently Bought Together

Your Baby's First Year: Third Edition + Caring for Your Baby and Young Child, 5th Edition: Birth to Age 5
Price For Both: CDN$ 26.38


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

About the Author

 
Steven P. Shelov, M.D., M.S., F.A.A.P., pioneered and developed several of the parenting publications for the American Academy of Pediatrics, including Caring for Your Baby and Young Child, The First Year of Life, and A Guide to Your Child’s Symptoms. In 2002, he was presented with the Lifetime Achievement in Education Award by the AAP, its highest award for pediatric education. In 2009, Dr. Shelov received the Clifford G. Grulee Award, recognizing his outstanding service to the AAP.
 
The American Academy of Pediatrics is an organization of 60,000 primary care pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists, and pediatric specialists dedicated to the health, safety, and well-being of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults.
 

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One

 Preparing for a New Baby   

  Pregnancy is a time of anticipation, excitement, preparation, and, for many new parents, uncertainty. You dream of a baby who will be strong, healthy, and bright--and you make plans to provide her with everything she needs to grow and thrive. You probablyalso have fears and questions, especially if this is your first child, or if there have been problems with this or a previous pregnancy. What if something goes wrong during the course of your pregnancy, or what if labor and delivery are difficult? What if beinga parent isn't everything you've always dreamed it would be? These are perfectly normal feelings and fears to have. Fortunately, most of these worries are needless. The nine months of pregnancy will give you time to have your questions answered, calm your fears,and prepare yourself for the realities of parenthood.  

Some of your initial concerns may have been raised and addressed if you had difficulty becoming pregnant, particularly if you sought treatment for an infertility problem. But now that you're pregnant, preparations for your new baby can begin. The bestway to help your baby develop is to take good care of yourself, since medical attention and good nutrition will directly benefit your baby's health. Getting plenty of rest and exercising moderately will help you feel better and ease the physical stresses ofpregnancy. Talk to your physician about prenatal vitamins, and avoid smoking, alcohol, and eating fish containing high levels of mercury. 

  As pregnancy progresses, you're confronted with a long list of related decisions, from planning for the delivery to decorating the nursery. You probably have made many of these decisions already. Perhaps you've postponed some others because your baby doesn'tyet seem "real" to you. However, the more actively you prepare for your baby's arrival, the more real that child will seem, and the faster your pregnancy will appear to pass.

   Eventually it may seem as if your entire life revolves around this baby-to-be. This increasing preoccupation is perfectly normal and healthy and actually may help prepare you emotionally for the challenge of parenthood. After all, you'll be making decisionsabout your child for the next two decades--at least! Now is a perfect time to start.  

Here are some guidelines to help you with the most important of these preparations.      

Giving Your Baby a Healthy Start    

Virtually everything you consume or inhale while pregnant will be passed through to the fetus. This process begins as soon as you conceive. In fact, the embryo is most vulnerable during the first two months, when the major body parts (arms, legs, hands,feet, liver, heart, genitalia, eyes, and brain) are just starting to form. Chemical substances such as those in cigarettes, alcohol, illegal drugs, and certain medications can interfere with the developmental process and with later development, and some caneven cause congenital abnormalities.

   Take smoking, for instance. If you smoke cigarettes during pregnancy, your baby's birth weight may be significantly decreased. Even inhaling smoke from the cigarettes of others (passive smoking) can affect your baby. Stay away from smoking areas and asksmokers not to light up around you. If you smoked before you got pregnant and still do, this is the time to stop--not just until you give birth, but forever. Children who grow up in a home where a parent smokes have more ear infections and more respiratoryproblems during infancy and early childhood. They also have been shown to be more likely to smoke when they grow up.  

There's just as much concern about alcohol consumption. Alcohol intake during pregnancy increases the risk for a condition called fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), which is responsible for birth defects and below-average intelligence. A baby with fetal alcoholsyndrome may have heart defects, malformed limbs (e.g., club foot), a curved spine, a small head, abnormal facial characteristics, small body size, and low birth weight. Fetal alcohol syndrome is also the leading cause of mental retardation in newborns. Alcoholconsumption during pregnancy increases the likelihood of a miscarriage or preterm delivery, as well.  

There is evidence that the more alcohol you drink during pregnancy, the greater the risk to the fetus. It is safest not to drink any alcoholic beverages during pregnancy.  

You also should avoid all medications and supplements except those your physician has specifically recommended for use during pregnancy. _This includes not only prescription drugs that you may have already been taking, but also nonprescription or over-the-counterproducts such as aspirin, cold medications, and antihistamines. Even vitamins can be dangerous if taken in high doses. (For example, excessive amounts of vitamin A have been known to cause congenital [existing from birth] abnormalities.) Consult with your physicianbefore taking drugs or supplements of any kind during pregnancy, even those labeled "natural." 

  Fish and shellfish contain high-quality protein and other essential nutrients, are low in saturated fat, and contain fatty acids called omega-3's. They can be an essential part of a balanced diet for pregnant women.

   At the same time, you should be aware of the possible health risks from eating fish while you're pregnant. You should avoid raw fish during pregnancy because it may contain parasites such as flukes or worms. Cooking and freezing are the most effectiveways to kill the parasite larvae found in fish. For safety reasons, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends cooking fish at 140 degrees Fahrenheit. The fish should appear opaque and flaky when done. Certain types of cooked sushi such as eel andCalifornia rolls are safe to eat when pregnant.   The most worrisome contaminant in both freshwater and ocean fish is mercury (or more specifically, a form of mercury called methyl mercury). Mercury in a pregnant woman's diet has been shown to be damaging to the development of the brain and nervous systemof the fetus. The FDA advises pregnant women, women who may become pregnant, nursing mothers, and young children to avoid eating shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish due to high levels of mercury in these fish. According to the FDA, pregnant womencan safely eat an average of 12 ounces (two average meals) of other types of cooked fish each week. Five of the most commonly eaten fish that are low in mercury are shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon, pollock, and catfish: Albacore tuna tends to be high in mercury,so canned chunk light tuna is a better choice. If local health agencies have not issued any advisories about the safety of fish caught in your area, you can eat up to 6 ounces (one average meal) per week of fish you catch from local waters, but don't consumeany other fish during that week.  

While no adverse effects from minimal caffeine intake (one cup of caffeinated coffee per day) have yet been proven, you may want to limit or avoid caffeine when you are pregnant. Remember, caffeine is also found in many soft drinks and foods such as chocolate.  

Another cause of congenital abnormalities is illness during pregnancy. You should take precautions against these dangerous diseases:  

German measles (rubella) can cause mental retardation, heart abnormalities, cataracts, and deafness. Fortunately, this illness now can be prevented by immunization, although you must not get immunized against rubella during pregnancy. If you're not surewhether you're immune, ask your obstetrician to order a blood test for you. In the unlikely event that the test shows you're not immune, you must do your best to avoid sick children, especially during the first three months of your pregnancy. It is then recommendedthat you receive this immunization after giving birth to prevent this same concern in the future.

   Chickenpox is particularly dangerous if contracted shortly before delivery. If you have not already had chickenpox, avoid anyone with the disease or anyone recently exposed to the disease. You also should receive the preventive vaccine when you are notpregnant.   Herpes is an infection that newborns can get at the time of birth. Most often, it occurs as the infant moves through the birth canal of a mother infected with genital herpes. Babies who get a herpes viral infection may develop fluid-filled blisters onthe skin that can break and then crust over. A more serious form of the disease can progress into a severe and potentially fatal inflammation of the brain called encephalitis. When a herpes infection occurs, it is often treated with an antiviral medicationcalled acyclovir. Women may reduce their risk of contracting the herpes virus by following safer sexual practices. 

  Toxoplasmosis is primarily a danger for cat owners. This illness is caused by a parasitic infection common in cats, but it also is found in uncooked meat and fish. The infected animal excretes a form of the parasite in its stools, and people who come incontact with infected stools could become infected themselves. To guard against this disease, see the box Protecting Against Toxoplasmosis on page 9.      

Getting the Best Prenatal Care   

  Throughout your pregnancy, you should work closely with your obstetrician to make sure that you stay as healthy as possible. Regular doctor's visits up until the birth of your baby can significantly improve your likelihood of having a healthy newborn.During each doctor's visit, you will be weighed, your blood pressure will be checked, and the size of your uterus will be estimated to evaluate the size of your growing fetus.   Here are some areas that deserve attention during your pregnancy.    

   Nutrition &#...

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars A great guide for first time parents April 15 2011
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I bought this book when we found out we were pregnant. This would be our first baby, so I needed something that I could rely on to take good care of him/her. Being edited by the American Academy of Pediatrics, it seemed a trustworthy source. In fact, I found it to be a great book and very easy to read! It tells you about taking care of your baby in the first year (feeding, diapers, sleep, clothing...), hie/her development (what to expect in each month in regards to, e.g., sleeping or motor reflexes), helping him/her grow healthily (common health problems, signs to watch for, etc), and stimulating his/her learning (appropriate toys, learning abilities, etc). It also has several chapters on ailments, general care if your baby gets sick and when to take him/her to the pediatrician. This is an extremely informative book if you are looking for a practical guide to help you take care of your baby. It won't talk about pregnancy, or tell stories... I didn't put it in practice yet, but it makes me feel more confident as a new parent. Even if you don't plan to read it from cover to back (like I am doing), I'm positive it can be a useful resource to consult from times to times, particularly if you are new to parenthood and has no family member around you.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book! Sept. 3 2010
By New Dad
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
Very easy to read and some great tips.. Being a new dad with twins, both my wife and I were 'thrown into the deepend'....
I've been reading this book just before bed time and we are trying to implement some of the recommmended ideas on how to handle our newborns. Very easy to order, and the timely shipment of the book was great too.. recommend the book, the seller, and amazon.ca!
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  80 reviews
28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, lots of reading Feb. 4 2011
By S. Stephen - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book presents itself like a 800 page novel, so if you don't like to read a lot or want more pictures, this book isn't for you. It's full of great material, but again, it reads like a thick book. It has some great growth charts in the back (but they're really small since the book is small) and it has great sections on common (and uncommon) illnesses. If you want straightforward information from a trustworthy source, you can't get much more trustworthy than the American Academy of Pedicatrics. If you LOVED your What to Expect When Expecting book, I would get the What to Expect in the First Year book. I didn't like the WTEWE book so I didn't get the first year book, I chose this one instead.
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Informative. Jan. 31 2011
By newmom - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
I have really enjoyed reading this book before my daughter was born and now re-reading the chapters as she gets older. I am a Family Medicine physician, so I feel that I know a lot about children, but this book has a lot of practical advice that is supported by the AAP and current clinical guidelines. It is also inexpensive. I think this is a great book for new parents.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Helpful Sept. 7 2010
By Lauren Magill - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
Helpful guide. Our baby started vomiting at two weeks, and this book was a very helpful guide through what was a scary event.
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ok book - there are better ones Dec 11 2010
By t19p5 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
Bought this book in addition to Baby411 and What to expect 1st year. It's an ok book but the other two books are better. There is not that much useful info even though this book is pretty thick. The text is dry and clinical. Baby411 has tips and suggestions while this book just describes things with no potential solutions. I wouldn't recommend it to a friend.
12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Can't do without! Aug. 11 2010
By J. Pastor - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I have an older edition of this book but I'm sure the updated version is only that much more helpful.
This has everything. Developmental milestones, physical growth, insturctions on how to feed at each stage, sleep training, and an entire section on all the major health problems babies can have. It has tylenol dose charts, etc. It is so helpful in so many ways!
I intend to buy a book from the American Academy of Pediatrics for the next phase as my son just turned age one!
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback