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David Hugaert (Honolulu, HI United States)

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Of Mice and Men
Of Mice and Men
by John Steinbeck
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 11.70
111 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Our 'Mice' Have Tender 'Grapes'!, Dec 1 2003
This review is from: Of Mice and Men (Paperback)
As is true of all John Steinbeck novels, all of the stories are set in Salinas, California - Steinbeck's hometown. This is the geographic region where this prized author spent all of his time (generally outdoors) writing and observing, and was a very studious "freak of nature", so to speak. A surprisingly interesting read, "Of Mice And Men" focuses on two subjects named George and Lennie. George dreams of getting steady work on an animal farm, while his aimless, slow-witted friend (Lennie) has an ongoing desire to pet (and mangle) mice and other assorted creatures. These two take up residence with various other persons along their evasive journey as well. But, there's one pressing problem: Could George tame Lennie long enough to help make this dream a reality? You, just like our two "heroes", will have to journey through the vast rivers and valleys of Salinas to find out! If you're just an average reader, like myself, you'll want to read "Of Mice And Men" at least twice, just to understand the subtle nuances and charm of the overall story. With so much to offer, this Steinbeck tale of yore is definitely a keeper!

Rudy
Rudy
VHS
Offered by Sellavie Online Traders
Price: CDN$ 19.84
11 used & new from CDN$ 0.85

5.0 out of 5 stars "Rudy": One film that touches the heart (and soul)!, Nov. 17 2003
This review is from: Rudy (VHS Tape)
"Rudy" - the 1993 blockbuster starring Sean Astin in the title role, is one motion picture that reminds us no goal or obstacle is too big or too small to be accomplished successfully, if one is willing to persevere through all hardships. "Rudy" gets this message across to the viewer quite well, and with no major stumbling blocks or any errors, for that matter. Determined to defy all those who doubt his dream of playing football at the University of Notre Dame, Daniel "Rudy" Ruettiger sets off for South Bend, Indiana with a duffle bag filled with hopes and a bus ticket. Once arriving at his intended destination, he is met by a caring Catholic priest (Robert Prosky), who sees Rudy's heart and desire, and is determined to help this young man accomplish his goal. A timeline is established, where Rudy must maintain a respectable grade point average at Holy Cross Junior College in a year's time. If grades are successfully met, he'll be one step closer to realizing his dream of both playing football for the Fighting Irish, thus gaining admission into Notre Dame. Adding a bit more meat and potatoes to "Rudy"'s storyline, are fine, upstanding, believable performances from Ned Beatty (as Rudy's father), Scott Benjaminson (as Rudy's doubting Thomas brother), Lili Taylor (as Rudy's girlfriend) and Jason Miller (as legendary ND coach Ara Parseghian). Charles S. Dutton's performance as the head stadium groundskeeper mustn't be overlooked, either. To sum everything up, "Rudy" is a film that's about more than just football. It's about conquering mountains, big and small, which isn't impossible, as long as one keeps their nose to the grindstone, or, in this case, to the gridiron. Having doubts about whether or not you can win life's battles? See this movie. Hearing nothing but negativity from those around you while en route to accomplishing your goal? See this movie. Do you dream of getting a college degree, and want to make it a reality? SEE THIS MOVIE!!! Oh, and see if you can spot the cameo appearance of Mr. Daniel Ruettiger himself (INTERESTING TIDBITS: The exterior shot of the Holy Cross College campus, is actually one of the colleges on the Notre Dame campus. The scene in the campus coffee shop where Rudy and D-Bob (Jon Favreau [another actor I (almost) overlooked!]) are talking/studying, is shot in ND's O'Shaughnessy Hall, and the interior Holy Cross classroom scenes were filmed at a nearby high school). With so much to offer, "Rudy" truly lives up to its moniker as the "Rocky Of The '90s"! See it, if you haven't already. You won't be disappointed!

A Trick Of The Tail
A Trick Of The Tail
Price: CDN$ 13.52
15 used & new from CDN$ 10.02

5.0 out of 5 stars Gabriel may be gone, but Genesis carry on, May 25 2003
This review is from: A Trick Of The Tail (Audio CD)
Upon Peter Gabriel's departure following "The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway" tour in 1975, the British press were predicting the death of Genesis, because they assumed Peter wrote everything, and therefore he WAS Genesis. The truth was that Gabriel wrote mostly all of the lyrics, while the rest of the music was composed by the other four members. After the smoke had cleared, Genesis was left a quartet, and therefore were determined to prove to the world Genesis were still the giants of the progressive rock scene, as well as make the British press eat their own words. And boy, did Phil Collins, Michael Rutherford, Tony Banks and Steve Hackett make the media eat those words, or what? The music on "A Trick of the Tail" will definitely attest to that fact. Even though Peter Gabriel may be gone from the band, his spirit is still etched in a majority of the selections here. The opening track, "Dance On A Volcano" gets "Trick..." moving in grand, artsy progressive fashion, and the progressive traits never let up through the entire CD. This is followed by the gorgeous Steve Hackett/Tony Banks composition "Entangled" - where Banks' mellotron intricacies and Hackett's signature guitar virtuosity lead the way. Then, it's on to the hard-hitting punch of "Squonk", perhaps the proggiest song on "ATOTT". This is where Collins' vocals are at their most harsh, which add a greater degree of character to this Banks/Rutherford composition. The desert swept nuances of "Mad Man Moon" close out the first half of "ATOTT", and it's on to the latter half. The beginning of the second half starts off with what is perhaps the weakest song on "Trick..." - the slightly "off-color" humor of "Robbery, Assault & Battery". The cops & robbers story featured here doesn't exactly grab my interest, thus, it lacks a characteristic which made Gabriel-era Genesis such a pleasure to listen to. Peter Gabriel brought such a unique air of wit and character depth to each individual role on record, that it breathed such life into the songs. Phil Collins, on the other hand, brings very little, if any, life to the charaterizations here and on "Wind & Wuthering", that they all sound very monotonous, thus sucking all the humor out of the otherwise witty story. Then, it is on to the other best song on the CD, the unpretentiously beautiful "Ripples". When listening to this track and "Entangled", it is easy to see how Steve Hackett's musical and (painfully few) lyrical contributions were important to the production of this album (including "Wind & Wuthering" to the same degree) and to Genesis as a unified whole. The title track is almost a sharp contrast to both of the above tracks, as it would sort of foreshadow the pop music that was in their future. "Los Endos" closes the CD with a thunderous bang, and is quite fusiony, featuring ballsy jazz/rock influences. Phil Collins would immediately explore this territory with Brand X - with which he would join upon the release of "ATOTT". As far as the remastered version of "Trick..." is concerned, the overall quality of sound is a drastic improvement, when compared to the first generation version. In the remastered edition, one can now hear the crispness of the mellotron, guitar and drum sounds, which all sounded fuzzy on the first generation British CD I own. Even Phil Collins' vocals on this "new and improved" version sound more strong and more muscular, a great improvement over his "mousey" style, as presented on the early CD. Even the texture contained within the CD booklet's contents is a 360 degree improvement. Whereas the older CD booklet contained black and white illustrations on a white background, the remastered CD booklet contains all color illustrations - brown figures on a goldenrod background, making it a virtual rainbow cornucopia. Now, with "A Trick of the Tail" completed, Genesis accomplished at least two major feats. One, they made "ATOTT" a huge seller, which outsold all prior Genesis releases up to that point. Two, they finally sent the critics and their narrow-minded viewpoints packing, letting them know that Genesis was here to stay. Athough this legendary band is now no more, their spirit has never left since. With that said, no progressive rock collection is complete without "A Trick of the Tail" and the group's follow up "Wind & Wuthering" added to your classic Genesis collection.

Spectral Mornings
Spectral Mornings
Price: CDN$ 14.87
5 used & new from CDN$ 12.00

4.0 out of 5 stars ...The True Musical Heart And Soul of Classic Genesis..., April 24 2003
This review is from: Spectral Mornings (Audio CD)
One listen to "Spectral Mornings" (Steve Hackett's third solo album, and his second since leaving Genesis), alongside the first post-Hackett Genesis album "...And Then There Were Three..." should confirm all truths and suspicions of where the true musical spirit within the above classic band resided. It really resided within both Hackett and Peter Gabriel, both of whom provided a uniquely sound and in-depth musical (and lyrical) concept within the band's tightly-knit (wall of sound) structure. Not to take anything away from either Tony Banks, Phil Collins or Mike Rutherford - all of whom are exceptionally talented musicians in their own right. It's just that, in my humble opinion, Genesis lost some credibility soon after Gabriel, and later Hackett, left - meaning that the wall of sound which made Genesis a household name in the world of progressive rock, would cease to exist as soon as the group trimmed down to a three-piece. At this point in time, only the name of the band remained the same throughout its lengthy history. Anyway, the first Steve Hackett album, "Voyage of the Acolyte" (1975) demonstrated Hackett's ability to experiment with different musical styles in grand fashion, all while remaining within the musical restraints of his soon to be former band at the time. Hackett's sophomore effort, "Please Don't Touch" (1978), finds him using a slightly different musical approach, but more variances are found there, both musically and personally, espeially the latter. Hackett used a lineup of performers from different musical genres (Richie Havens, Randy Crawford, Steve Walsh and Phil Ehart [both of Kansas] to create an even balance of effective musicianship and lyrical spontaneity. Whereas "VotA" contained mostly a more ralaxed, and, at certain points, a more evasive intrumental approach, "Spectral Mornings" (1979) mostly cuts to the chase, delivering straight-ahead, mostly progressive rock, in even fashion. Also, the lyrical output is solid, being brought out like a full harvest blossom, courtesy of Hackett's songwriting capabilities (as well as on the guitar, Hackett's "raison d'etre") and Pete Hicks' passionate vocals. The instrumentals are no slouches either, for they're the reason which makes "SM" such a provocative and special masterpiece. "The Red Flower of Tachai Blooms Everywhere" is among the pick of the litter of the instrumentals here, complete with a unique East Asian flair, which words cannot describe. It must be listened to (in full) in order to be wholly appreciated. The title instrumental follows right behind, and contains a homogenous blend of both wonderfully sound soft and hard "progressive" textures. There's a humorous side to this record as well, as is wonderfully executed in "The Ballad of the Decomposing Man ('Scenes From The Office Party')". This track is the perfect musical companion to Emerson, Lake & Palmer's "Benny The Bouncer" (from "Brain Salad Surgery"), complete with a "quasi-styled" gay nineties theme. This selection features some witty lyrics as well. "Spectral Mornings"' other selections shouldn't be ignored as well, although one or two of these hint at commercialism, especially the opening track "Every Day" - with its catchy melodies and chorus, although it's still an upstanding number, nevertheless. When comparing most of Hackett's and Genesis' future works from this point onward, it's easy to see that the former took one giant leap forward, while the latter took two major leaps backward. Again, one needs to only listen to "SM" and "...ATTWT..." side by side to remove all doubts and suspicions of where the true musicianship of Genesis truly resided within the band (even though I happen to be quite fond of "...ATTWT..." - being that it's my favorite record from the trio era). So, just sit back and take in these introspective "Spectral Mornings". There's no better way to put your time to good use!

Spectral Mornings
Spectral Mornings
Price: CDN$ 14.87
5 used & new from CDN$ 12.00

4.0 out of 5 stars ...The True Musical Heart And Soul of Classic Genesis..., April 24 2003
This review is from: Spectral Mornings (Audio CD)
One listen to "Spectral Mornings" (Steve Hackett's third solo album, and his second since leaving Genesis), alongside the first post-Hackett Genesis album "...And Then There Were Three..." should confirm all truths and suspicions of where the true musical spirit within the above classic band resided. It really resided within both Hackett and Peter Gabriel, both of whom provided a uniquely sound and in-depth musical (and lyrical) concept within the band's tightly-knit (wall of sound) structure. Not to take anything away from either Tony Banks, Phil Collins or Mike Rutherford - all of whom are exceptionally talented musicians in their own right. It's just that, in my humble opinion, Genesis lost some credibility soon after Gabriel, and later Hackett, left - meaning that the wall of sound which made Genesis a household name in the world of progressive rock, would cease to exist as soon as the group trimmed down to a three-piece. At this point in time, only the name of the band remained the same throughout its lengthy history. Anyway, the first Steve Hackett album, "Voyage of the Acolyte" (1975) demonstrated Hackett's ability to experiment with different musical styles in grand fashion, all while remaining within the musical restraints of his soon to be former band at the time. Hackett's sophomore effort, "Please Don't Touch!" (1978), finds him using a slightly different musical approach, but more variances are found there, both musically and personally, especially the latter. Hackett used a lineup of performers from different musical genres (Richie Havens, Randy Crawford, Steve Walsh and Phil Ehart [both of Kansas] to create an even balance of effective musicianship and lyrical spontaneity. Whereas "VotA" contained mostly a more relaxed, and, at certain points, a more evasive intrumental approach, "Spectral Mornings" (1979) mostly cuts to the chase, delivering straight-ahead, mostly progressive rock, in even fashion. Also, the lyrical output is solid, being brought out like a full harvest blossom, courtesy of Hackett's songwriting capabilities (as well as on the guitar, Hackett's "raison d'etre") and Pete Hicks' passionate vocals. The instrumentals are no slouches either, for they're the reason which makes "SM" such a provocative and special masterpiece. "The Red Flower of Tachai Blooms Everywhere" is among the pick of the litter of the instrumentals here, complete with a unique East Asian flair, which words cannot describe. It must be listened to (in full) in order to be wholly appreciated. The title instrumental follows right behind, and contains a homogenous blend of both wonderfully sound soft and hard "progressive" textures. There's a humorous side to this record as well, as is wonderfully executed in "The Ballad of the Decomposing Man (Featuring 'The Office Party')". This track is the perfect musical companion to Emerson, Lake & Palmer's "Benny The Bouncer" (from "Brain Salad Surgery"), complete with a "quasi-styled" gay nineties theme. This selection features some witty lyrics as well. Even Hackett's slightly elevated vocal delivery on "...Decomposing Man" smacks of Greg Lake's on the above-mentioned ELP selection. "Spectral Mornings"' other selections shouldn't be ignored as well, although one or two of these hint at commercialism, especially the opening track "Every Day" - with its catchy melodies and chorus, although it's still an upstanding number, nevertheless. When comparing most of Hackett's and Genesis' future works from this point onward, it's easy to see that the former took one giant leap forward, while the latter took two major leaps backward. Again, one needs to only listen to "SM" and "...ATTWT..." side by side to remove all doubts and suspicions of where the true musicianship of Genesis truly resided within the band (even though I happen to be quite fond of "...ATTWT..." - being that it's my favorite record from the trio era). So, just sit back and take in these introspective "Spectral Mornings". There's no better way to put your time to good use!

One Hour Photo (Widescreen) (Bilingual)
One Hour Photo (Widescreen) (Bilingual)
DVD ~ Robin Williams
Offered by Fulfillment Express CA
Price: CDN$ 16.31
50 used & new from CDN$ 0.62

5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best films of 2002!, March 25 2003
If one needs proof of Robin Williams' dramatic acting skills, then he/she needs to look no further than last year's highly effective "One Hour Photo". Here, Williams' cinematic performance is worth many a rave review, and clearly puts him in the spotlight, up close and personal as Sy "the one hour photo guy". We look in on our study in action, working as a lab photo technician at a Wal-Mart-type knockoff. While developing many a photograph, one particular family catches Sy's eye, as well as his personal camera lens, as Sy's job becomes his personal obsession, an obsession that could wind up going too far if Sy isn't careful. In fact, this job means everything to our photography expert, as this storyline is conveyed clearly to the viewer. As the film progresses, the story itself becomes more intense, with the action becoming even more developmental with each passing scene. But, Robin Williams, whose performance here is nothing short of breathtakingly spectacular, isn't the only star whose performance shouldn't go unnoticed. Kudos should also go to Gary Cole, whose performance as a superstore manager and Sy's boss, although somewhat brief, is also worthy of high marks, especially in the intensity dept.. Cole's character is the absolutely perfect opposite foil of Williams' character, where the latter exhibits a Type B personality as opposed to Cole's Type A demeanor. With so many hooks to keep the frequent moviegoer (and regular video purchaser) entertained, and with its star and supporting cast's performances to boot (including Eriq La Salle's [of "ER" and "Coming To America" fame] credible role as a police detective), "One Hour Photo" just might earn Robin Williams the Best Actor Oscar of 2002. This "One Hour Photo" is always in service at your local video retailer today. With all the recent upgrades in video technology, the DVD of this title is your sure ticket to intense chills, thrills and spills, so don't miss out!

Discipline
Discipline
Offered by Vanderbilt CA
Price: CDN$ 37.95
7 used & new from CDN$ 14.00

4.0 out of 5 stars A strong return for King Crimson, March 23 2003
This review is from: Discipline (Audio CD)
After retiring King Crimson after recording the "Red" LP in 1974, Robert Fripp felt the group accomplished all it could both musically and lyrically, thus going out with a monstrous bang at that point. Fripp, along with guitarist Adrian Belew, stick bassist/synth player Tony Levin and drumming ace Bill Bruford, reformed a new and revitalized Crimson lineup (with only Fripp and Bruford returning from the previous 1970's lineup) in 1981. This fantastic foursome released three albums in the 1980's, beginning with "Discipline" (otherwise known as the 'other' "Red" album). "Discipline" shows Crimson at its most in-depth and at its most productive musically, even after a nearly seven-year absence, and with half of its lineup including two new members to boot. Fripp demonstrates unique guitar sounds on "Discipline"'s opening track, "Elephant Talk", while the rest of the band is solid on "Frame By Frame". Belew writes some of his most romantically profound lyrics on one of Crimson's more bluesy numbers, "Matte Kudasai". However, things get more decadently tense on the remaining instrumentals - especially "Indiscipline", where Fripp, Belew and Bruford each display a virtually insightful musician's clinic, which blends together rather professionally. Ah, but the bass/stick synth talents of Tony Levin need not go unnoticed here on "Discipline", either, as he brings a jarring presence to the forefront on yet another instrumental, "Thela Hun Ginjeet". "The Sheltering Sky" also brings with it its own musical notariety, complete with subtle nuances as deep as the midnight sky. Tony Levin also puts in a noteworthy performance on the latter track as well. The self-titled instrumental (Another one? How discreetly delicious and thoughtful of these guys!) adds yet more depth and "Discipline" to Crimson's repertoire, and closes out the CD on a strong and positive note. The LP sleeve version of "Discipline" contains a bonus track, a reprise of "Matte Kudasai (alternate version)", sort of a continuation of the third track. Of the three albums King Crimson released in the '80's ("Discipline", "Beat" and "Three of a Perfect Pair"), the first and the third offerings make for strong bookends in both the musical and lyrical department, while the middle entry falters due to splattery and disjointed production for the most part (except for "Beat"'s two strong instrumentals "Sartori in Tangier" and "Requiem"). Even though Crimson's usually strong jazz intricacies are neatly tucked away beneath the new wave and bluesy introspections on "Discipline", it is still the strongest effort of their '80's outings, but still doesn't quite match up with their 1970's musical majestics. So, "Discipline" yourself to get off of that sofa, and make a trip down to your retailer and purchase this title today. If you miss the bygone era of vinyl-type packaging without the plastic black discs inside, then the LP sleeve packaging of "Discipline" is definitely the way to go!

Beat
Beat
Offered by thebookcommunity_ca
Price: CDN$ 27.16
7 used & new from CDN$ 27.16

3.0 out of 5 stars King Crimson's "Pop" Masterpiece?, March 15 2003
This review is from: Beat (Audio CD)
King Crimson has released some spectacularly crafted and musically insightful masterworks throughout their lengthy career, especially their 1960's and '70's output. After ending the latter decade with the explosive "Red", Robert Fripp decided to retire Crimson, feeling the band went as far as it could go creatively as well as musically. In 1981, Fripp reformed King Crimson once again - replacing lead vocalist and bassist John Wetton with Adrian Belew (guitar and lead vocals) and Tony Levin (stick, bass synth). Only Fripp (guitar and Frippertronics) and Bill Bruford (percussion) returned from the previous lineup. The latter four musicians released "Discipline" in 1981. In 1982, Belew, Fripp, Levin and Bruford released their second record together, "Beat". All previous Crimson lineups prior to this one (and afterward) were always known for churning out innovative melodies, combined with an over the top musical craftsmanship, all performed on a highly professional musical level. Unfortunately, there's very little of the above qualities displayed on "Beat". Most of the selections here are nothing more than cheesy, half-baked attempts at "stylish" new wave and synthesized pop. Add to what little "Beat" has already going for it, are the lion's share of the trite, aimless lyrics written by Belew, which, for the most part, can be written by your average preschooler. In fact, a majority of preschoolers can write more insightful lyrics than these. The only track that has any noteworthy semblance of strength in the "Creative Writing 101, Inc", Dept., is the descriptive "Neurotica". If there is even the slightest notion to include "Beat" to your "essential" CD collection, it is the two instrumentals "Sartori In Tangier" and "Requiem", although on Crimson's next release, "Three of a Perfect Pair", "Nuages (That Which Passes, Passes Like Clouds)" and "Industry" are stronger instrumentals, both of which feature strong stick and bass playing and knock 'em dead percussives, both supplied to the nth degree by Levin and Bruford, respectively. As for the musicianship on "Beat", the star player here is Tony Levin, who shows the most depth of the four musically, with the other three basically phoning in their licks - which, for the most part, are blatantly repetitive and lack focus. This says a lot for both Fripp and Bruford, who are usually superior musicians in their own right - except on "Beat", when compared to most other Crimson works falls flat on its face both musically and lyrically. Unless you're a die-hard Crimson fan, I'd strongly recommend leaving "Beat" out of your all-important CD collection. But, if you must have it, purchase it for the two instrumentals mentioned above, and for the CD booklet's pictures and newspaper articles. Otherwise, "Beat" leaves no lasting impression.

Construkction Of Light
Construkction Of Light
Offered by Vanderbilt CA
Price: CDN$ 27.95
13 used & new from CDN$ 9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Fripp and Crimson break musical ground once again!, Feb. 25 2003
This review is from: Construkction Of Light (Audio CD)
In the words of guitar master Robert Fripp: "King Crimson once again reinvents itself. We have a new wheel." Hence, the wheel contained in this, "The ConstruKction of Light" rolls through quite smoothly, and without any noticeable "squeaks", either! Crimson has never rocked harder, a fact to which all eleven numbers will attest. Speaking of reinventing, Adrian Belew does just that with his often-refined vocal stylings, which come through loud and clear on the opening "ProzaKc Blues". It is the catatonically disturbing and heart-pulsatingly descriptive musicianship of master bassist Trey Gunn and all over the boards drummer Pat Mastelotto which adds to the dark and ominous tone to all the selections here. Belew's depressing lyrics add the finishing touch to the chillingly deceptive theme which runs throughout this "construKctive" masterwork. Upon hearing Mastelotto's stormy, cutting-edge drumming technique and Gunn's sweet-science bass playing, as are strongpoints in one of the instrumentals featured in this "construKction", "Larks' Tongues In Aspic, Part IV", the question you'll ask yourself about the former is: "This guy was in Mr. Mister?!!?" Joining Crimson has matured Pat's musicianship, immensely. This is well documented into "Coda: I Have A Dream" as well, with Belew's garbled, fuzzy vocals wonderfully buried in the mix. Crimson shows they are not afraid to go out of the fire and "Into The Frying Pan" with spectacular and depth-defying precision. In summing up King Crimson's long history, which dates back to its humble beginnings to 1967, it is safe to say some of their works to a degree on paricular albums (ex: "In The Court of the Crimson King") are long-winded and hypnotically sleep-inducing (such as "The Dream and the Illusion" section of "Moonchild" from the above-listed title). None of these ingredients are contained in "The ConstruKction of Light", which makes for an eye and ear opening musical listening experience. Make this "...Oyster Soup, Kitchen Floor Wax Museum" odyssey your "pearl" by adding this "gem" to your essential (and concise) King Crimson collection today!

Tales From Topographic Oceans (Remastered)
Tales From Topographic Oceans (Remastered)
Offered by Vanderbilt CA
Price: CDN$ 19.28
12 used & new from CDN$ 9.44

5.0 out of 5 stars These "Tales" evoke many "Wondrous Stories"!, Jan. 3 2003
Yes's "Tales From Topographic Oceans" will definitely go down in history as one of the most debateable (double) albums in rock music history, or, at least in the annals of progressive rock. Many avid Yes fans are quick to praise this double disc work a masterpiece - the best Yes ever did, while others point out that "Tales..." is an overly-flawed, ultra-bombastic disaster, or the worst album in Yes' history, or, in the minds of most prog-heads, the worst "effort" to grace the prog-rock scene in the genre's rather varied and storied history. Those who are apt to hate it, either have a short attention span, or they just don't appreciate good...make that GREAT music. And "TFTO" isn't just GREAT music...it exceeds boundaries of sheer GENIUSNESS and exudes BRILLIANCE. Here is a somewhat brief track-by-track synopsis of each of the four "movements": "THE REVEALING SCIENCE OF GOD: Dance of the Dawn": A down-to-earth, yet musically and lyrically breathtaking arrangement. The band starts off on the right foot, combining moving and soothing instrumentation, which segues nicely between time changes. Rick Wakeman's keyboards are just awesomely dazzling - the highlight of this track. Steve Howe and newcomer Alan White provide a rather homogenous rhythm section (on lead guitar and drums, respectively) thoughout parts of this track as well. All in all, a very "revealing" and enchanting listen. "THE REMEMBERING: High The Memory": The circus-like calliope opening (courtesy of Wakeman) permeates this track, coupled with Howe's acoutic-styled guitar playing. Chris Squire's thumping bass adds a little something extra to this "excursion", but otherwise, the track as a whole comes off as being the least strong of the four, only to be saved by a tender and romantic vocal from Jon Anderson. Still worth tuning into, though. On to Disc #2... "THE ANCIENT': Giants Under the Sun": What can I say about this particular movement? It is the intro of Alan White's and Chris Squire's percussive introspections and "liquid" bass playing that makes this track for me. There are other audio delights to keep an ear out for as well, so stay tuned! "RITUAL: Nous Sommes Du Soleil": The final movement of this double-CD masterpiece is the most spine-tingling and profound music ever committed to record. A prime example is chillngly displayed at around the 14:20 mark, when Alan White's chimes and Rick Wakeman's mesmerizing keyboard/synthsizer pulsations reach their ultimate climax, which make a calming transition into Steve Howe's soothing guitar crescendo towards the final minutes. Yes displays some upstanding bluesy/jazzy arpeggiations, which make sporadic appearances here, too. Now, if only Jon Anderson could work on pronouncing his French a little more properly! Overall, "TFTO" is one of Yes' most introspective and brilliant masterworks to date, with "Close To The Edge" being a close second. If only those Yes naysayers would put their own shortcomings aside and give "Tales..." another careful listen, they might like what they hear...and they, too, would regard it as a work of pure musical and lyrical genius. Yes, folks, "Tales From Topographic Oceans" will cause your ears' auditory system to experience spontaneous orgasms, so please be sure and listen with great caution!

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