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The Perks of Being a Wallflower
The Perks of Being a Wallflower
by Stephen Chbosky
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 11.19
112 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic book!!!!!!, March 21 2007
The Perks of Being a Wallflower, written by Stephen Chbosky, is a coming of age story that portrays the teenage life of a boy named Charlie, who is just entering High School. He battles with finding new friends, trying drugs, fitting in, and overall, just finding himself in the world. "I went to the library and checked out a book because I was getting scared . . . The book said that sometimes people take LSD, and they don't really get out of it . . . I started breathing fast in the library" (Chbosky 101). Charlie experimented with LSD, and realized that just because his friends did something, that didn't mean he had to do it too.

I highly recommend this book. It's a page turner that has a lot going for it. There is a very clear plot. "I just wish that god or my parents or Sam or my sister or someone would just tell me what's wrong with me" (Chbosky 139). Charlie just wants to know who he is. He's tired of trying to find out on his own, and he's ready to just have someone tell him. Charlie deals with a lot in this coming of age novel. He is the source of the major conflict in the story. "Patrick did call me, but all he said was that Craig got really angry at Sam about me, and I should keep staying away until things got clear" (Chbosky 130). All of Charlie's friends got mad at him when he kissed his true love, Sam, instead of his own girlfriend, in a game of "Truth or Dare". Everyone turned against him, but this was just the beginning. Many things happen to Charlie, that by the end of the story, you feel as though you know him yourself.

Read this book! No matter your age or gender, it's one that everyone can enjoy. It's the coming of age story of a boy who is lost, and it portrays a wonderful new perspective if a teenage boy. Adults will learn, or be reminded of what it's actually like to be young, and kids will just understand completely. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, written by Stephen Chbosky, is a well-written, well-rounded novel that I highly recommend! The Perks of Being a Wallflower, written by Stephen Chbosky, is a coming of age story that portrays the teenage life of a boy named Charlie, who is just entering High School. He battles with finding new friends, trying drugs, fitting in, and overall, just finding himself in the world. "I went to the library and checked out a book because I was getting scared . . . The book said that sometimes people take LSD, and they don't really get out of it . . . I started breathing fast in the library" (Chbosky 101). Charlie experimented with LSD, and realized that just because his friends did something, that didn't mean he had to do it too.

I highly recommend this book. It's a page turner that has a lot going for it. There is a very clear plot. "I just wish that god or my parents or Sam or my sister or someone would just tell me what's wrong with me" (Chbosky 139). Charlie just wants to know who he is. He's tired of trying to find out on his own, and he's ready to just have someone tell him. Charlie deals with a lot in this coming of age novel. He is the source of the major conflict in the story. "Patrick did call me, but all he said was that Craig got really angry at Sam about me, and I should keep staying away until things got clear" (Chbosky 130). All of Charlie's friends got mad at him when he kissed his true love, Sam, instead of his own girlfriend, in a game of "Truth or Dare". Everyone turned against him, but this was just the beginning. Many things happen to Charlie, that by the end of the story, you feel as though you know him yourself.

Read this book! No matter your age or gender, it's one that everyone can enjoy. It's the coming of age story of a boy who is lost, and it portrays a wonderful new perspective if a teenage boy. Adults will learn, or be reminded of what it's actually like to be young, and kids will just understand completely. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, written by Stephen Chbosky, is a well-written, well-rounded novel that I highly recommend! The Perks of Being a Wallflower, written by Stephen Chbosky, is a coming of age story that portrays the teenage life of a boy named Charlie, who is just entering High School. He battles with finding new friends, trying drugs, fitting in, and overall, just finding himself in the world. "I went to the library and checked out a book because I was getting scared . . . The book said that sometimes people take LSD, and they don't really get out of it . . . I started breathing fast in the library" (Chbosky 101). Charlie experimented with LSD, and realized that just because his friends did something, that didn't mean he had to do it too.

I highly recommend this book. It's a page turner that has a lot going for it. There is a very clear plot. "I just wish that god or my parents or Sam or my sister or someone would just tell me what's wrong with me" (Chbosky 139). Charlie just wants to know who he is. He's tired of trying to find out on his own, and he's ready to just have someone tell him. Charlie deals with a lot in this coming of age novel. He is the source of the major conflict in the story. "Patrick did call me, but all he said was that Craig got really angry at Sam about me, and I should keep staying away until things got clear" (Chbosky 130). All of Charlie's friends got mad at him when he kissed his true love, Sam, instead of his own girlfriend, in a game of "Truth or Dare". Everyone turned against him, but this was just the beginning. Many things happen to Charlie, that by the end of the story, you feel as though you know him yourself.

Read this book! No matter your age or gender, it's one that everyone can enjoy. It's the coming of age story of a boy who is lost, and it portrays a wonderful new perspective if a teenage boy. Adults will learn, or be reminded of what it's actually like to be young, and kids will just understand completely. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, written by Stephen Chbosky, is a well-written, well-rounded novel that I highly recommend!

The Virgin Suicides
The Virgin Suicides
by Jeffrey Eugenides
Edition: Paperback
173 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars Bright but dark also, March 21 2007
This review is from: The Virgin Suicides (Paperback)
I chose to read The Virgin Suicides as an English assignment and in reading the book I then had to watch the film and write about something that intrigued me. It could either be how they were similar or how they were different and how differing pieces from the novel and the film had an impact on the plot or strength of what it was all about.

I rated this book as a 4 because I thought that Jeffrey Eugenides did an excellent job of portraying life as it was like for many young women back in the 70's when this book took place and as a result often ended in a tragic way. Even though it is not clearly laid out and printed in words for you as to why the book ends as it does we all can interpret for ourselves why and I believe that we would all come up with the same answer.

In reading the book and watching the film I found that Sophia Coppola, director of the Paramount pictures classic, portrayed the lives of the young girls and the Lisbon parents in a very similar fashion as did Jeffrey Eugenides as to not change the true meaning of what the book was expressing. In fact the film is almost an exact replica of what happens in the book with silimar dialogue and chain of events. If you pay close attention little details were left out of the film but nothing that I found that drastically changed what Eugenides was trying to say. As I examined both pieces closely in an attempt to write a paper relating the two in some way or another one thing stood out to me. If you get a chance, notice the way that the relationships that the girls have with the neighborhood boys is different. However, I'm sure that all of you would agree with me, but I found that what Eugenides was trying to portray as a dreamy, fantasy-like friendship with the unattainable Lisbon girls in the book was more tangible and realistic in the film. For that reason I expected the ending of Coppola's film to have somewhat of a different ending considering the fact that their relationship seemed more friendly and that they actually had contact with one another.

But in review as a whole, I pretty much enjoyed the book. It seemed very really to me and I'm sure it is a topic that many people touch on whetehr it be from personal experience or being around a similar situation with someone you know or love.

I chose to read The Virgin Suicides as an English assignment and in reading the book I then had to watch the film and write about something that intrigued me. It could either be how they were similar or how they were different and how differing pieces from the novel and the film had an impact on the plot or strength of what it was all about.

I rated this book as a 4 because I thought that Jeffrey Eugenides did an excellent job of portraying life as it was like for many young women back in the 70's when this book took place and as a result often ended in a tragic way. Even though it is not clearly laid out and printed in words for you as to why the book ends as it does we all can interpret for ourselves why and I believe that we would all come up with the same answer.

In reading the book and watching the film I found that Sophia Coppola, director of the Paramount pictures classic, portrayed the lives of the young girls and the Lisbon parents in a very similar fashion as did Jeffrey Eugenides as to not change the true meaning of what the book was expressing. In fact the film is almost an exact replica of what happens in the book with silimar dialogue and chain of events. If you pay close attention little details were left out of the film but nothing that I found that drastically changed what Eugenides was trying to say. As I examined both pieces closely in an attempt to write a paper relating the two in some way or another one thing stood out to me. If you get a chance, notice the way that the relationships that the girls have with the neighborhood boys is different. However, I'm sure that all of you would agree with me, but I found that what Eugenides was trying to portray as a dreamy, fantasy-like friendship with the unattainable Lisbon girls in the book was more tangible and realistic in the film. For that reason I expected the ending of Coppola's film to have somewhat of a different ending considering the fact that their relationship seemed more friendly and that they actually had contact with one another.

But in review as a whole, I pretty much enjoyed the book. It seemed very really to me and I'm sure it is a topic that many people touch on whetehr it be from personal experience or being around a similar situation with someone you know or love.

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