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Jeremy Ulrey "Bangyrmfhead" (Austin, TX)

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Bubba Ho-Tep
Bubba Ho-Tep
DVD ~ Bruce Campbell
Offered by DVD Monkey
Price: CDN$ 49.99
21 used & new from CDN$ 2.48

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars classic bruce, April 5 2004
This review is from: Bubba Ho-Tep (DVD)
The plot is as silly as it sounds, but there is a certain pathos to the movie, a wistful longing for youth and the rueful woes an elderly man forced to rely on others must handle on a day-to-day basis, that elevates this film above it's b-movie aspirations. I certainly didn't anticipate walking into this movie expecting any actual insight into the plight of the geriatric set, but "Bubba Ho-Tep" (largely due to the quality of the source material by Joe R. Lansdale) transcends it's genre trappings and comes out a winner. I especially liked the attention to detail concerning the past lives of Elvis and JFK; there are discreet references to peanut butter and banana sandwiches, as well as less discreet displays of martial arts (..). The characters act as though you'd expect people with the pasts of Elvis and JFK to behave themselves, and it's this playing it straight when most films of this type would have gone for over-the-top gore and humor that makes "Bubba Ho-Tep" an instant cult classic.

Bubba Ho-Tep
Bubba Ho-Tep
DVD ~ Bruce Campbell
Offered by DVD Monkey
Price: CDN$ 49.99
21 used & new from CDN$ 2.48

5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Bruce, April 5 2004
This review is from: Bubba Ho-Tep (DVD)
About two-and-a-half, three years ago I went to a special "Bruce Campbell Event" at the original downtown Alamo Drafthouse in Austin, TX. This was ostensibly a book signing for "If Chins Could Kill", but it was a bit more than that: there was a screening of "Evil Dead 2", preceded by a viewing of the then-unreleased "Fanalysis" documentary and a unique Q&A session, during the latter of which a drunk redneck stumbled onstage and attempted to duplicate Bruce's famous "grab hair and flip" move from the scene in Evil Dead 2 where his hand gets possessed.
This was the first I'd heard anything of "Bubba Ho-Tep", but it sounded right up my alley. Fast forward to late last year, when "Bubba Ho-Tep" was finally released to select theaters. On at last getting a chance to see this flick, it turned out to be at last something both meeting my expectations and far exceeding them.
The plot is probably well known to all Bruce fans by now, but here's the short version: Bruce is Elvis - the REAL Elvis - who switched places with an impersonator back in his heyday when he got tired of the limelight. The impersonator OD'ed, as we all know, and the real Elvis/fake impersonator broke his hip falling off stage and ended up in a nursing home. There he meets Ossie Davis, a black man who insists he's JFK, and together they fight off an Egyptian Soulsucker before he has the chance to rip the souls from their (...)(couldn't make this up if I tried).
The plot is as silly as it sounds, but there is a certain pathos to the movie, a wistful longing for youth and the rueful woes an elderly man forced to rely on others must handle on a day-to-day basis, that elevates this film above it's b-movie aspirations. I certainly didn't anticipate walking into this movie expecting any actual insight into the plight of the geriatric set, but "Bubba Ho-Tep" (largely due to the quality of the source material by Joe R. Lansdale) transcends it's genre trappings and comes out a winner. I especially liked the attention to detail concerning the past lives of Elvis and JFK; there are discreet references to peanut butter and banana sandwiches, as well as less discreet displays of martial arts (Elvis did achieve a black belt in real life, and was so into karate at one point that he insisted most of his entourage join him in lessons as well). The characters act as though you'd expect people with the pasts of Elvis and JFK to behave themselves, and it's this playing it straight when most films of this type would have gone for over-the-top gore and humor that makes "Bubba Ho-Tep" an instant cult classic.

Bubba Ho-Tep
Bubba Ho-Tep
DVD ~ Bruce Campbell
Offered by DVD Monkey
Price: CDN$ 49.99
21 used & new from CDN$ 2.48

5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Bruce, March 31 2004
This review is from: Bubba Ho-Tep (DVD)
About two-and-a-half, three years ago I went to a special "Bruce Campbell Event" at the original downtown Alamo Drafthouse in Austin, TX. This was ostensibly a book signing for "If Chins Could Kill", but it was a bit more than that: there was a screening of "Evil Dead 2", preceded by a viewing of the then-unreleased "Fanalysis" documentary and a unique Q&A session, during the latter of which a drunk redneck stumbled onstage and attempted to duplicate Bruce's famous "grab hair and flip" move from the scene in Evil Dead 2 where his hand gets possessed (the redneck made it through the flip, but the landing must have shaken up some Chinaman's bowl of rice as hard as it was).
This was the first I'd heard anything of "Bubba Ho-Tep", but it sounded right up my alley. Fast forward to late last year, when "Bubba Ho-Tep" was finally released to select theaters. On at last getting a chance to see this flick, it turned out to be at last something both meeting my expectations and far exceeding them.
The plot is probably well known to all Bruce fans by now, but here's the short version: Bruce is Elvis - the REAL Elvis - who switched places with an impersonator back in his heyday when he got tired of the limelight. The impersonator OD'ed, as we all know, and the real Elvis/fake impersonator broke his hip falling off stage and ended up in a nursing home. There he meets Ossie Davis, a black man who insists he's JFK, and together they fight off an Egyptian Soulsucker before he has the chance to rip the souls from their arses (couldn't make this up if I tried).
The plot is as silly as it sounds, but there is a certain pathos to the movie, a wistful longing for youth and the rueful woes an elderly man forced to rely on others must handle on a day-to-day basis, that elevates this film above it's b-movie aspirations. I certainly didn't anticipate walking into this movie expecting any actual insight into the plight of the geriatric set, but "Bubba Ho-Tep" (largely due to the quality of the source material by Joe R. Lansdale) transcends it's genre trappings and comes out a winner. I especially liked the attention to detail concerning the past lives of Elvis and JFK; there are discreet references to peanut butter and banana sandwiches, as well as less discreet displays of martial arts (Elvis did achieve a black belt in real life, and was so into karate at one point that he insisted most of his entourage join him in lessons as well). The characters act as though you'd expect people with the pasts of Elvis and JFK to behave themselves, and it's this playing it straight when most films of this type would have gone for over-the-top gore and humor that makes "Bubba Ho-Tep" an instant cult classic.

Bubba Ho-Tep
Bubba Ho-Tep
DVD ~ Bruce Campbell
Offered by DVD Monkey
Price: CDN$ 49.99
21 used & new from CDN$ 2.48

5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Bruce, March 31 2004
This review is from: Bubba Ho-Tep (DVD)
... "Bubba Ho-Tep" was finally released to select theaters. On at last getting a chance to see this flick, it turned out to be at last something both meeting my expectations and far exceeding them.
The plot is probably well known to all Bruce fans by now, but here's the short version: Bruce is Elvis - the REAL Elvis - who switched places with an impersonator back in his heyday when he got tired of the limelight. The impersonator OD'ed, as we all know, and the real Elvis/fake impersonator broke his hip falling off stage and ended up in a nursing home. There he meets Ossie Davis, a black man who insists he's JFK, and together they fight off an Egyptian Soulsucker before he has the chance to rip the souls from their [rears] (couldn't make this up if I tried).
The plot is as silly as it sounds, but there is a certain pathos to the movie, a wistful longing for youth and the rueful woes an elderly man forced to rely on others must handle on a day-to-day basis, that elevates this film above it's b-movie aspirations. I certainly didn't anticipate walking into this movie expecting any actual insight into the plight of the geriatric set, but "Bubba Ho-Tep" (largely due to the quality of the source material by Joe R. Lansdale) transcends it's genre trappings and comes out a winner. I especially liked the attention to detail concerning the past lives of Elvis and JFK; there are discreet references to peanut butter and banana sandwiches, as well as less discreet displays of martial arts (Elvis did achieve a black belt in real life, and was so into karate at one point that he insisted most of his entourage join him in lessons as well). The characters act as though you'd expect people with the pasts of Elvis and JFK to behave themselves, and it's this playing it straight when most films of this type would have gone for over-the-top gore and humor that makes "Bubba Ho-Tep" an instant cult classic.

Dreamcatcher
Dreamcatcher
by Stephen King
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: CDN$ 9.92
111 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Subpar, March 10 2004
Critics jokingly refer to King's "loggorhea", his ability to churn out several lengthy tomes of new material each year, but the underlying implication is that this is one of the signs of his greatness. Pardon me for dissenting, but when every other novel (and sometimes several in a row) are of as poor quality as "Dreamcatcher" maybe it's time to take a laxative and kick off the shoes for awhile.
This book is cookie cutter King at his worst. Not only does he bite heavily from other writers and filmmakers, constantly quoting other superior works that deal with similar themes and plot elements, but he's guilty also of ripping off his own material. We have shipwrecked aliens that use mind manipulation techniques to control humans (Tommyknockers), recurring flashbacks to life altering events in the characters' childhood (It), an intellectual infant who turns out to hold the key to everything (too many books to count)... the list goes on. Unfortunately so does the book. I suppose it's King's matter-of-fact storytelling that makes some fans feel every word that spills out of his typewriter is priceless, but it's rather obvious to the more objective reader that very little he's churned out in the past 10-15 years (at least) couldn't use some judicious editing. Most of the back story in "Dreamcatcher" is mildly diverting but not at all necessary. Not to mention it smacks of that old "Moby Dick" ploy of heightening the suspense by tossing in chapters unrelated to the current narrative at key moments. Problem is, Melville employed this technique with expertise and finesse, rarely overstaying his welcome, whereas you get the impression with "Dreamcatcher" that King just doesn't have much of a plot to work with and is padding out the opening segments with excess exposition in a vain attempt to achieve some sort of balance with the later parts of the book. This "balancing" means the novel takes over 300 pages to really get going.
I hate to even expand too much farther on my thoughts here, since most people reading this review will probably be diehard Stephen King fans and the ensuing carpal tunnel syndrome will be all for naught, but when that "4 out of 162 people found this review helpful" eventually appears above the byline I want to make sure I've earned the right to protest (after all, rating a review is not supposed to be whether you agree with the writer's assessment, but rather how well they've elucidated their opinion and given someone who hasn't read the book an idea of what they might expect).
So what else do we have here? First of all, as others have already mentioned, King's penchant for namechecking pop culture icons and including snatches of classic rock tunes in his work used to be cute and quirky, but after thirty years of publishing it's now only indicative of his inability to get up off his laurels and try something fresh.
Furthermore, though King has long been known for his realistic portrayals of children (particularly teenagers), he also has a tendency to take advantage of their youthful uncertainty to make them do things that would seem plausible to an adult. In "Dreamcatcher", the pivotal event in the lead characters' life comes when, as 8th graders, they come across some high school bullies tormenting a mentally disabled kid and intervene. That in and of itself is not all that unbelievable, but the fact that they befriend this kid (Duddits for those keeping score) for life seems like an act of charity unbefitting these capricious youths. I say this because, frankly, Duddits as written is not all that endearing a character. I'm sure his enthusiasm and baby talk were meant to be cute, but instead he comes off as a complete caricature that is bordering on offensive in and of itself. The bottom line is he's portrayed as a challenged individual that would be more likely to be tolerated for his inadequacies than embraced as a joy to be around. Furthermore, I'm getting a little sick of these "innocence as salvation" motifs in King's work, but if it had to continue here he could have at least fleshed out the whole telepathy aspect a bit more, maybe explore the possibility that Duddits' mental deficiency is tied in with his telepathic abilities, etc. And speaking of fleshing out character arcs, one character's drinking problem is mentioned repeatedly but only serves to force him into making one dumb decision that helps to drive the plot forward (deus ex machina, anyone?). Another character's accident the previous year is introduced as a psychically tramautic event but only gives King an excuse to introduce the element of intrusive thoughts before the aliens swoop in and give them something of their own to think about.
I could go on but I'm held to 1000 words and I've gotta be getting close. Hopefully I've managed to convey the depth of inadequacies in this book without beating anyone over the head, but the various levels of failings in "Dreamcatcher" do warrant more than a brief "thumbs up/down" synopsis, especially in light of King's reputation and prior body of work. I'm sure he'll bounce back (and forth), but in the meantime he might consider the idea that not everything he sits down to write needs to see the light of day. There's another book entitled "The Lost Writings of Stephen King" that I was perusing recently, and I noticed that the lion's share of unpublished fiction was either written in his younger, pre-published days or in those first 5-10 years of semi-stardom, when his work was judged strictly by it's quality and not just because it had King's name on the cover.

Dreamcatcher
Dreamcatcher
by Stephen King
Edition: Hardcover
114 used & new from CDN$ 2.42

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Subpar, March 10 2004
This review is from: Dreamcatcher (Hardcover)
Critics jokingly refer to King's "loggorhea", his ability to churn out several lengthy tomes of new material each year, but the underlying implication is that this is one of the signs of his greatness. Pardon me for dissenting, but when every other novel (and sometimes several in a row) are of as poor quality as "Dreamcatcher" maybe it's time to take a laxative and kick off the shoes for awhile.
This book is cookie cutter King at his worst. Not only does he bite heavily from other writers and filmmakers, constantly quoting other superior works that deal with similar themes and plot elements, but he's guilty also of ripping off his own material. We have shipwrecked aliens that use mind manipulation techniques to control humans (Tommyknockers), recurring flashbacks to life altering events in the characters' childhood (It), an intellectual infant who turns out to hold the key to everything (too many books to count)... the list goes on. Unfortunately so does the book. I suppose it's King's matter-of-fact storytelling that makes some fans feel every word that spills out of his typewriter is priceless, but it's rather obvious to the more objective reader that very little he's churned out in the past 10-15 years (at least) couldn't use some judicious editing. Most of the back story in "Dreamcatcher" is mildly diverting but not at all necessary. Not to mention it smacks of that old "Moby Dick" ploy of heightening the suspense by tossing in chapters unrelated to the current narrative at key moments. Problem is, Melville employed this technique with expertise and finesse, rarely overstaying his welcome, whereas you get the impression with "Dreamcatcher" that King just doesn't have much of a plot to work with and is padding out the opening segments with excess exposition in a vain attempt to achieve some sort of balance with the later parts of the book. This "balancing" means the novel takes over 300 pages to really get going.
I hate to even expand too much farther on my thoughts here, since most people reading this review will probably be diehard Stephen King fans and the ensuing carpal tunnel syndrome will be all for naught, but when that "4 out of 162 people found this review helpful" eventually appears above the byline I want to make sure I've earned the right to protest (after all, rating a review is not supposed to be whether you agree with the writer's assessment, but rather how well they've elucidated their opinion and given someone who hasn't read the book an idea of what they might expect).
So what else do we have here? First of all, as others have already mentioned, King's penchant for namechecking pop culture icons and including snatches of classic rock tunes in his work used to be cute and quirky, but after thirty years of publishing it's now only indicative of his inability to get up off his laurels and try something fresh.
Furthermore, though King has long been known for his realistic portrayals of children (particularly teenagers), he also has a tendency to take advantage of their youthful uncertainty to make them do things that would seem plausible to an adult. In "Dreamcatcher", the pivotal event in the lead characters' life comes when, as 8th graders, they come across some high school bullies tormenting a mentally disabled kid and intervene. That in and of itself is not all that unbelievable, but the fact that they befriend this kid (Duddits for those keeping score) for life seems like an act of charity unbefitting these capricious youths. I say this because, frankly, Duddits as written is not all that endearing a character. I'm sure his enthusiasm and baby talk were meant to be cute, but instead he comes off as a complete caricature that is bordering on offensive in and of itself. The bottom line is he's portrayed as a challenged individual that would be more likely to be tolerated for his inadequacies than embraced as a joy to be around. Furthermore, I'm getting a little sick of these "innocence as salvation" motifs in King's work, but if it had to continue here he could have at least fleshed out the whole telepathy aspect a bit more, maybe explore the possibility that Duddits' mental deficiency is tied in with his telepathic abilities, etc. And speaking of fleshing out character arcs, one character's drinking problem is mentioned repeatedly but only serves to force him into making one dumb decision that helps to drive the plot forward (deus ex machina, anyone?). Another character's accident the previous year is introduced as a psychically tramautic event but only gives King an excuse to introduce the element of intrusive thoughts before the aliens swoop in and give them something of their own to think about.
I could go on but I'm held to 1000 words and I've gotta be getting close. Hopefully I've managed to convey the depth of inadequacies in this book without beating anyone over the head, but the various levels of failings in "Dreamcatcher" do warrant more than a brief "thumbs up/down" synopsis, especially in light of King's reputation and prior body of work. I'm sure he'll bounce back (and forth), but in the meantime he might consider the idea that not everything he sits down to write needs to see the light of day. There's another book entitled "The Lost Writings of Stephen King" that I was perusing recently, and I noticed that the lion's share of unpublished fiction was either written in his younger, pre-published days or in those first 5-10 years of semi-stardom, when his work was judged strictly by it's quality and not just because it had King's name on the cover.

Cosmopolis: A Novel
Cosmopolis: A Novel
by Don DeLillo
Edition: Hardcover
53 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars Slow but not exactly sweet..., March 8 2004
This review is from: Cosmopolis: A Novel (Hardcover)
Right about the time I polished off "Underworld" for the third time, this new tome by the same author comes along. At just over 200 pages, I figured this would be a quick way to get some more DeLillo under my belt before I tackled any of his early works. I figured wrong.
"Underworld", for all it's brilliance, contained numerous dull passages, often of a rather lengthy nature, many of them made dull by seemingly motiveless characters who wandered around performing inexplicable acts of minimal consequence, all in the name of some presumable Big Statement that never coalesced. BUT, and it's a big but (note the caps!), there were a superior number of masterful plot threads that were successfully brought to fruition, and it was these latter threads that not only saved the novel but made it one of the best published in the last ten years (I say this, of course, not having read much genre fiction, but if that's your bag you're probably not reading this review anyway).
The problem with "Cosmopolis" can be summed up rather succinctly: it contains all of the drawbacks of "Underworld" without any of the payoffs. The lead character, Eric Packer, never clicks with the reader, even though all the Big Statement elements inherent in this plot are telegraphed way in advance (hell, the stretch limo on the cover just about says it all, and considering DeLillo is no minimalist that's not a good sign). The symbolism of having a disenfranchised ex-executive plotting to assassinate Packer also seems a bit obvious a ploy for someone as skilled in sketching out characters as Delillo.
"Cosmopolis" is further burdened by a long laundry list of non-events that make up the plot and offer little resolution; a scene toward the end where Packer bursts into tears at a rapper's funeral seems to come out of nowhere, and nothing in the narrative up to that point has sufficiently illustrated the kind of growing remorse that leads to the inexplicable final quarter of the book. Nonetheless, believeable or not, once it's been made clear that Packer has growned disillusioned with his world to the point of self-destruction, the novel's denouement seems not only obvious but inevitable.
All in all, not one of Delillo's finer works. In fact, this is exactly the type of book where you can get a good idea of it's quality from reading reviews. You can never agree with any one critic 100% of the time, but when a universal cross section of write ups all point to the same pros or cons of any given work it's about as good advice as you're going to get prior to reading the book for yourself. Which is indeed recommended, but in the case of Delillo and "Cosmopolis" do yourself a favor and save this one for last.

Master of Puppets
Master of Puppets
Offered by Vanderbilt CA
Price: CDN$ 22.95
14 used & new from CDN$ 1.52

5.0 out of 5 stars A certified heavy metal benchstone, March 2 2004
This review is from: Master of Puppets (Audio CD)
Let's not beat around the bush here. "Master" is, if not THE finest all time heavy metal album, at least tied for first place with a handful of other classics such as "Piece of Mind" and "Paranoid". Even the holiest of Priest relics (ie. "British Steel") are padded with at least a few songs' worth of filler, something "Master of Puppets" is never guilty of. It's rather incredible that the weakest song on the album is probably "Damage Inc", yet that song is nonetheless a stone cold classic in the Metallica canon to this day, having highlighted many a setlist over the years.
Opening track "Battery" set a new standard of brutality for the band, a traditional thrash standard the likes of which used to be a mainstay on track one, side one of every Metallica album back in the day. The title track remains in the top five of the band's catalog, a kinetic paean to substance abuse which bears far more heft than anything James Hetfield has penned since getting out of rehab. Lyrically, "The Thing That Should Not Be" treads shallow water, but conceptually and thematically it's one of the most musically realized pieces on the record.
Side two is chock full of unheralded Metallica classics, or at least as chock full as an eight track album can get. No doubt token instrumental "Orion" hasn't become a live staple a la "Call of Ktulu (sic)" due to it's laid back, dreamlike quality, but in my opinion this is one of the primary reasons Metallica have fallen off the right track over the years: they seem to have progressively (regressively?) got to the point where they don't want to bother writing anything that won't "kick ass!" live, which ends up making their studio albums increasingly one dimensional. "Orion" is a curious anomaly in Metallica's repertoire, but a brilliant one, and it's a shame they've so seldom explored this direction on subsequent efforts.
Side two also contains "Disposable Heroes", an anti-war sequel to "For Whom the Bell Tolls", and "Leper Messiah", which is named after a line in David Bowie's "Suffragette City" and I believe concerns the hypnotic cult-like appeal of pop icon Oprah Winfrey (kidding). Wrapping it up is the aforementioned "Damage Inc.", an unapologetic stomper which concludes the album with all the ferocious veracity with which it began.
So what we're left with nearly twenty years later is a seminal album the likes of which have never been surpassed or duplicated, even by Metallica themselves. They'd come close to this level of achievement with their next record ("And Justice For All"), despite the loss of Cliff Burton, but once the 90s arrived the new decade found the band trailing off into entirely different tangents, none of which were as convincingly brilliant as their work here. A career watermark.

Load
Load
Offered by Vanderbilt CA
Price: CDN$ 16.75
30 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars Definite about face, Feb. 23 2004
This review is from: Load (Audio CD)
Metallica have spent the last seven years claiming that anyone who doesn't like "Load" is a hatemonger out to stifle the band's musical ambitions. Pull up a seat, Lars, it's time we had a chat.
First of all, you guys made a bit of a left turn on 1991's so called "Black Album" (didn't Prince beat you to that one?), and many self respecting "old school" 'Tallica fans consider it hands down your finest hour. Do you honestly think it's the haircuts that made the difference this time around? Let's start with pre-LP single "Until It Sleeps". If I wanted dime store Smashing Pumpkins I'd have picked up "Adore" or that Zwan album. Hell, stick a pair of plugs up James' nostrils and you'd have a breathy instrumental. I still cannot figure out to this day why some people insist on pretending Hetfield can sing, but that's between you and me, Lars. We both know who the REAL backbone of this group is.
Next up: what's up with "Ain't my B**ch" exactly? Bet you spent a lot of time on that one, what with it's complex time signatures and grad school lyrics. Yes, Lars, I AM giving you sh*t. Frankly I'm tired of listening to yours. Have you noticed the fans at your shows getting younger and younger? Yes, Lars, the kids DO spend more money than their thirtysomething counterparts, that wasn't my point. Did you ever think maybe the fans are getting younger because teenagers are a bit less discriminating and thus easier to please intellectually? Wait, you think this is a GOOD thing? Lars, you're forty f**king years old. Name one forty year old Priest fan who thinks "Parental Guidance" is their best song. This is your legacy we're talking about here! Are you sure you want to cash all that in for a few quick bucks? OK, Lars, it's your life. Art is not a democracy, you're right. But I tell you what. Since you're not really making anything resembling art these days do you think you might be able to take a bit of constructive criticism? Oh? That's great! You say you have a roundtable discussion set up for your fans later on? And exactly where is this little shindig? Ah. The county courthouse. Say no more, Lars, say no more.

Few and Far Between
Few and Far Between
Price: CDN$ 15.56
20 used & new from CDN$ 7.07

3.0 out of 5 stars Poor vocals hamper above average songcraft, Feb. 14 2004
This review is from: Few and Far Between (Audio CD)
Shutdown are purveyors of an ultra-familiar brand of New York hardcore that=s enjoyed crossover success with the metal scene ever since the breakthrough of Biohazard in the mid-90's. AFew and Far Between@ is chock full of Acan do@ anthems designed to instigate a venue-by-venue uprising, and though in cases like these the intention is always superior to the actual message, Shutdown do manage to bring an urgent energy to their brand of sociological bravado. If there=s any liability here, it=s not the production by Roger Miret or the earnest cover of Warzone=s ADon=t Forget the Struggle, Don=t Forget the Streets@, but the straining vocals of Mark Scondotto. I=ve heard more macho hardcore screeching from the Beastie Boys camp, a statement most bands wouldn=t take as a compliment and probably shouldn=t. But at the end of the day it=s the songs that count, and on that count Shutdown prove themselves something more than armchair rebels. So as long as I don=t have to hear Scondotto=s voice demanding justice in the streets through a megaphone at three in the morning, I suppose I can manage to content myself with his crew=s recorded efforts.

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