Profile for Thomas Sheldon > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Thomas Sheldon
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,250,572
Helpful Votes: 0

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Amazon Communities.

Reviews Written by
Thomas Sheldon "NetAdmin_writer" (Santa Barbara, CA United States)
(REAL NAME)   

Page: 1
pixel
Viruses Revealed
Viruses Revealed
by David Harley
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 40.29
23 used & new from CDN$ 1.76

5.0 out of 5 stars Part of my research shelf, Nov. 5 2001
This review is from: Viruses Revealed (Paperback)
This is an absolutely essential book if you are involved in security in any way, and who isn't these days. With security now a core requirement for most networks, you've got to keep track of the virus scene. This book excels in its accessibility, and you need it on your bookshelf alongside other essential security books such as "Hacking Exposed" by McClure, Scambray, and Kurtz.
I am using this book as a reference to update my "Encyclopedia of Networking and Telecommunications" and to post new information at my Linktionary.com Web site. These days, you need to buy and read multiple sources of information to keep up with the latest developments. Sorry, that's the way it is. I am recommnding this book as one of those references.
These guys have obviously worked hard to get this material together. It is dense (who wants glossed-over security info?). The historical overview is interesting and essential. Think you know this stuff? Think again. The title of this book is "revealed" and it lives up to its name. You get the inside story on hundreds of viruses and that goes a long way toward helping you understand just what you are up against.
There are also essential chapters on management, information gathering, product evaluation, and product testing. And you need to read the chapter on risk and incident management so you can start building strategies to deal with future attacks.
The amount of material is amazing. Even the index is interesting to browse since you are bound to find curious things that will send you back into the book. There are numerous case studies that attest to the research done by the authors. You'll find historical info derived from police reports and companies that were hacked. Good stuff that helps you develop your own incident response strategies.
Now for the legal. You've got to develop internal policies and that means knowing the legal issues. This book does a good job of covering legal issues and legislation in a variety of countries, not just the US. It also provides important policy information that can help you develop your own internal policy statements.
Like I said, I am recommending this book. The time to update security books is ALWAYS, so make space on your shelves for this book.

Seat of the Soul
Seat of the Soul
by Gary Zukav
Edition: Paperback
177 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Don't misunderstand the point, Dec 27 1999
This review is from: Seat of the Soul (Paperback)
What Zukav is talking about is spiritual evolution, not biological evolution. You cannot apply science to spirituality (unless you are a researcher at MIT). Certainly the word "evolution" has evolved beyond Darwin's interpretation. Surely no scientist believes that the "rules" of evolution are engraved in stone.
John M (12-20-99) complains that Christians are always trying to exert their influence, but science does this as well. Don't get me wrong. I advocate science, but science is insignificant in the face of "the mystery." For example, science would like us to believe that it can explain everything about the world, never mind that funny event called the Big Bang where the world appeared out of nothing!
Likewise, science would like us to believe that our consciousness is a product of biological evolution. But suppose that biological evolution is not a product of random events. Suppose what we call "evolution" is being driver by something (call it The Tao, God, "awareness," an organizing principal, whatever) that pushes for higher levels of complexity and thus higher levels of consciousness. In this sense, a monkey is more evolved than a horse and people are more evolved than algae (paraphrasing Piske, 12-5-99).
Of course, I'm using consciousness in people are conscious"). But suppose that every seed is a potential stream of God-consciousness pushing for higher awareness. A beautiful orchid is God being conscious-- as a beautiful orchid--nothing more. That is good enough. As for us, somewhere along the way, we started thinking that our ego and not out spirit was the primary essence of our life.
What Zukav is talking about is reclaiming our spiritual nature. The ego has done its job. It has helped us dominate our environment. But it should no longer be the central theme of our existence. Zukav's theme of authentic power and multisensory humans is the best I have heard to explain what the next stage in our evolution should be.
Zukav's evolution is different from scientific evolution. It won't take millions of years of physical changes. We already have what we need. This is easy to understand once you get past thinking that we are here to "eat" the world. We only need to realize that we are evolving spiritual beings. This has nothing to do with religion and religious organizations. It works at the individual level when you realize that you are part of the "awareness" of the universe and fully participating in its creation now. The findings of the new physics tend to lead us to that. The world is indeed mysterious and fascinating.

Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet
Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet
by Katie Hafner
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 14.43
50 used & new from CDN$ 0.39

5.0 out of 5 stars I'm recommending this book and another, Dec 9 1999
I read this book while writing the latest edition of my "Encyclopedia of Networking." This is a great read, along with "Casting the Net" by Peter Salus. If you're interested, I've posted my reviews under the Salus book.

Page: 1