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The Ultimate Weight Solution Cookbook: Recipes for Weight Loss Freedom
The Ultimate Weight Solution Cookbook: Recipes for Weight Loss Freedom
by Phil McGraw
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 18.80
99 used & new from CDN$ 0.39

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Change of Pace for Dr. Phil - A Colourful Fun Book, June 2 2004
This book is a bit different for Dr. Phil. I liked his book - the thick recipe and calorie guide "The Ultimate Weight Solutions Food Guide" and some of his other books. The present book is shorter and more of a "fun" book, being just over 240 pages and seems a little more professional in presentation; he must have a new editor.
Most of Dr. Phil's books are actually a bit analytical and lend themselves to paperback because they are simple collections of his ideas, wisdom, and food lists. Here he has some fun and limits his recipes to over 100 or so, but most dishes are presented with a nice color photo - really an excellent series of photos - one per recipe, with a maximum of one recipe per page. Some recipes take two pages. The whole book is nicely done as an attractive package and gives an idea of what the dishes should look like. He presents a broad variety of dishes, well balanced for nutritional value, and covering many foods and the basic food groups. One gets hungry just looking at the beautiful photos. This does not compete with the "Joy of Cooking", but still it is a good book with lots of healthy dishes that do not seem too difficult to make. Makes a nice gift.
Excellent job - 4 stars.
Jack in Toronto

Battle Ready
Battle Ready
by Tom Clancy
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 33.60
79 used & new from CDN$ 0.78

4.0 out of 5 stars Old Fashioned Biography � But Written by Clancy, May 30 2004
This review is from: Battle Ready (Hardcover)
This a bit of an odd book being part military biography, part recollections and part free streaming - the last chapter his reflection on where we are in the world. But that part is minor -and it is mainly a good old fashioned biography less a family/boyhood section. In general it is an interesting read - Clancy being such a good writer and Zinni with the interesting story. In any case Zinni provides many comments and recollections while Clancy seems to edit and write to fill in the gaps between Zinni's descriptions of his career and Clancy provides the context and overall perspectives. The book would have been a lot better with some photos and maps and some parts a bit shorter and some longer with more writing by Clancy. There is a reasonable index but no references or bibliography. For myself the Vietnam section is the most compelling read along with his time as a middle east peace envoy near the end of the book. His years in training etc. and different assignments 1975 to 1990 are a bit of a yawn, and some parts with no photos and dry discussions of his mid career make it a bit slow. The book is good but not great. Dear authors: add photos and maps in the next or paperback version!
The book opens with a brief introduction to Zinni as CINC commander for the first 22 pages and then drops back to the beginning of his career where we find him in Vietnam. The next 100 pages covers the young lieutenant Zinni. Quickly we find him directing artillery fire on his first assignment. In his second combat experience he travels (naively) by himself by common Vietnamese bus to the Mekong Delta - Rung Sat. The oppressive heat, rivers, canals, jungle and the lurking VC (fighters by night farmers by day) all remind me very much of the recent book that I read on John Kerry - "Tour of Duty" - do not laugh! There is more in common than one might expect in some of their Vietnam stories.
I make the comparison with Kerry because Kerry and his men I think were average soldiers that came to serve, put in their time, do their part, and they wanted to leave - alive. Here we see a different picture with Zinni. He is a professional soldier first and seems less concerned about his own safety and he wants to stay in Vietnam with his fellow marines. He is very aggressive trying to fight when sick and wounded. Both Kerry and Zinni try to avoid the killing of civilians and to protect their men. But in general his early assignment are more like a "baseball utility player" or junior executive learning the ropes of the "marines corporation". He is sent around Vietnam where he fights as a back up with different groups of Vietnamese and US marines - not tied to one group like Kerry was - and he always seems to be in very active areas where you do not have time for reflection - as did Kerry. But like Kerry, he sometimes appearing to operate on gut instinct and adrenaline. For Zinni it was a time of learning and fighting.
He fights in the delta in the narrow rivers and jungle and swamps, near where Kerry had his Swift boat, then on to the central region of Binh Dinh, fighting with the Vietnamese marines where booby traps were a daily threat. Some of those Vietnamese marines that survived post war imprisonment by the north came to the US later with their families. He is assigned to a region near Saigon. He fights until so sick and with a low body weight he is forced to take a medical leave returning to the US for two years. Regaining his strength he returns and is promoted to commanding officer, Company A, 1 st battalion, 5th marines. There he suffers serious wounds from AK-47 fire and is evacuated by helicopter from the Que Son mountains. For both Zinni and Kerry, I think the Vietnam experience formed their characters.
The book goes on to chronicle his post war experiences in Okinawa, his ship-to-shore marine training, promotions to major and colonel, war college, and then promotion to general in 1989. He was in Israel during the Gulf war as a liaison officer with the patriot missile brigade. He spent time in Europe, the Pacific, led the Somalia effort and was promoted to run CENCOM. He was a man of action, always was volunteering for active marine assignments and he found retirement difficult. He tried to be a special peace envoy to the Middle East but was thwarted by the Palestinian division and violence. All in all this is a good book although I found some of the middle sections between Vietnam and Somalia a bit slow, but otherwise it is an interesting book, but not a real barn burner. The Vietnam part of 100 pages out of the 440 total is the most compelling and perhaps the most revealing.
Jack in Toronto

The Halliburton Agenda: The Politics of Oil and Money
The Halliburton Agenda: The Politics of Oil and Money
by Dan Briody
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 17.00
32 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars Mixed Emotions: Too Short, and Surprisingly It Features LBJ, May 30 2004
Did I get the wrong book from Amazon.com? The book is advertised to be a book about Cheney and Halliburton - it is about Halliburton but not Cheney. For example, pictures of Cheney appear on both the front and back covers of the book jacket. But that is very misleading. The book is not about Cheney per se; there are in fact only a dozen or so pages dealing with Cheney near the end of the book and he plays only a minor role; he finally appears on page 191 of the 237 added seemingly as an afterthought. Surprisingly, the dominant politician in the book is the former president and Texas native Lyndon Baines Johnson or LBJ. By my estimate and it is confirmed by looking at the index, LBJ takes up three times as much space in the book as Cheney, and furthermore he plays a much more important role in setting any "agenda" at Brown & Root - a subsidiary of Halliburton. Even though the book even if falsely promoted it is still an interesting read about two old US companies and their eventual merger; but at just 237 pages long in medium font is not a 5 star effort, just 3.5 stars, maybe only 3 stars at best.
The first company described is the oil well services company Halliburton started in approximately 1920 by Erle Halliburton in Oklahoma. Erle Halliburton died in 1957 leaving a successful and financially strong and independent business enterprise as his legacy. The second company is Brown & Root (B & R) that developed from being a Texas road construction company that was started around 1917 to become a major defense contractor. The business grew through political connections and after many decades B & R had become the largest engineering and construction company in the USA, boosted by the Vietnam war effort, and fed by a series of domestic and foreign construction and defense contracts stretching around the globe.
The book tells (very briefly) how these companies developed, merged in 1962 with R & B being bought by Halliburton, and how they became a major defense contractor. It also contains many side stories such as the influence of the rising political star LBJ in Texas, dam construction, back room operators such as A.J.Wirtz, political intrigue, the milking of Roosevelt's New Deal money, navy boat building, the fall of Leland Olds who was a bureaucrat blocking their expansion, the Johnson Space Center contract, Vietnam contracts, the LOGCAP contract, the Dresser merger, Henry Waxman's congressional charges against Halliburton and the sole sourcing, etc. Cheney appears near the end of the book and I did learn that Cheney flunked out of Yale and was arrested twice for DWI in his youth. There are a number of insights and comments on the current contracts to Halliburton. But since Halliburton had the LOGCAP contract before Cheney, it seems to me that Cheney played no more a dramatic role - I suspect - than any other good CEO or "rainmaker" might have played at Halliburton to boost its revenues.
As a book I would say it rates just 3 or 4 stars since as the author acknowledges that he uses and number of existing books such as "Erle P. Halliburton: Genius with Cement" and other publications, and most of the book is about the older history - as I said Cheney does not even appear until page 191 out of 237. So even when he appears the information is scant. Having said that it is clear the author has done extensive research, he has a nice reference section for further reading, he brings the story together, but overall it seems like a short collection of historical facts and tidbits. As it stands, it is more of a "gateway" book or introduction and it would have been a 5 star book if it was about 400-500 pages long and was more complete. But some of the references and 40 pages of notes at the back are worth a follow up read.
So surprisingly just 3 to 4 stars.
Jack In Toronto

Penguin Atlas World History 01 From Prehistory To The Eve French
Penguin Atlas World History 01 From Prehistory To The Eve French
by Hermann Kinder
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 11.55
38 used & new from CDN$ 7.84

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Nice Alternative to the Big Books - I Compare the Group, May 26 2004
As a reader I like to have quick reference books at my finger tips including a new version of the Oxford English Dictionary about 3500 pages long - that I use almost daily. So I decided to add a "history atlas". In the process of doing my research I read the other amazon.com reviewers and then made three trips to two large book stores to actually look at the books and get a better feel for which was the best. I ended up buying the Oxford Atlas of World History. Here are my picks and rankings.
Listed by My ranking, #1 is the best, #2 is a creative alternative but no substitute.
1. Atlas of World History, Oxford University Press 2002, 368 pages, $57.80, 13.5" x 10.3" x 1.62" ranked 46,632 on Amazon.com. Hands down winner - professional - good text descriptions, outstanding maps and drawings, covers most things from the cave man forward. Negatives: Big and heavy. If you want to save a few dollars buy the "concise" version.
2. Creative alternative: The Penguin Atlas of World History, Penguin Books 2004, $11.20, just a paperback sized, just published in May 04, 304 pages. Surprisingly impressive, lots of text and pictures mixed together and it is easy to carry around. A nice quick alternative but it will be printed in two volumes.

3. Timelines of World History, DK Publishing 2002, 666 pages, $27.20. 10.0" x 1.6" ranked 25,800 on Amazon.com. Second with lots of value but in some ways not as comprehensive.
4. National Geographic Almanac of World History, National Geographic 2003, 384 pages, $28.00, 9.6" x 7.8" x 1.17" ranked 24,426 on Amazon.com. Similar to but less impressive than Oxford books. More text, narrower coverage, fewer maps and drawings.
5. DK Atlas of World History, DK Publishing, 352 pages, $35.00, 10.96" x 14.66" x 1.28" ranked 10,716 on Amazon.com. My last place book seems like a giant comic book. I love the DK travel books but this seems like one step beyond DK's area of expertise. Superficially it is similar to the Oxford book and it is cheap, and some might like it but it tries to be politically correct and fails.
6. Oxford Dictionary of World History, Oxford University Press, 704 pages, $7,66, pocketbook sized, sales rank 330,000. Mainly terms, people, and dates but has a few maps also. Limited use but an alternative. I prefer the new Penguin book but this is the best history dictionary to buy.
Jack in Toronto

Wilderness Rivers of Manitoba: Journey by Canoe Through the Land Where the Spirit Lives
Wilderness Rivers of Manitoba: Journey by Canoe Through the Land Where the Spirit Lives
by Hap Wilson
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 15.64
10 used & new from CDN$ 14.45

4.0 out of 5 stars Quick Hand Me a Paddle, May 19 2004
I enjoyed this book and it is in many ways a very unusual book. It was written by Hap Wilson with the help of his wife Stephanie Aykroyd. They are experienced wilderness activists, canoe adventurers, and photographers. Hap has written other similar books and they live north of Toronto in Ontario, Canada (the province next to Manitoba) in a semi-wilderness and cottage area know as Muskoka. They are very passionate about their wilderness experiences and their various views on the environment and canoeing. I am from Manitoba originally, owned a canoe in that region, and know a little bit about the area. Having said that, this book covers some of the most remote areas of the province and the rivers - especially the most northerly - are rarely travelled by the general public. So this book is a bit of a pioneering effort and a great introduction. Some of the river trips last months.
The book is a combination of personal philosophy about the use of wilderness areas, an introduction to river canoeing, river etiquette, photographs and maps. The book can be enjoyed even if you never leave home. After hearing about polar bears some will want to stay at home.
Once we get passed the introduction, there is an approximate 25 page long guide to the climate, vegetation, and wildlife of Manitoba along with tips and techniques for camping and preparing for the river trips. This is mainly text and photos with a variety of hand sketches.
Next they follow a formula approach where each river system is discussed and presented as a trip - which Hap and others have made - accompanied with a river guide, hand drawn sketches of the rivers down to the sub kilometre level to show rapids and boat paths through rapids, photographs, comments on rapids, portages, degree of difficulty, insects, wildlife, length, access, etc. This takes about 130 pages. They cover 11 rivers starting in the southeast with the Manigotagan that flows through a forested region and they continue northward, river after river, finally to the Caribou River that runs through northern rolling Precambrian plain to Hudson Bay. This river runs through a northerly region that has a July mean temperature hovering around just 13 C or 56 F, and is almost but not quite void of life. They go to great lengths and according to the authors it took years to produce detailed guide. They describe each river in detail, river by river, each river with comments so that one can use the book as a practical river guide - supported with additional maps.
I have two minor complaints. The author likes to embellish the book with complicated words when simpler will do and because he is not John Updike it does not add to the book an some long words somehow feel out of place, i.e: "a landscape so discrete and multifarious as to beguile the senses", etc. just seems out of place when compared to the rest of the writing. My second peeve is the introduction. The author spent a lot of time and effort making the trips and doing the required research and making the maps, and detailing each river in a standardized format - all great stuff. But the introduction contains a lot of sentences and phrases that as I mentioned above seem out of place but shed little light on the subject and where the book will take us. It would be better to have a crisply written executive type summary at the start that summarizes where the book is summarized, saying for example, I travelled down the Pigeon River in 1998 in July with two other people during medium flow and warm and sunny weather. It took us 10 days. The trip down the Berens River was made a month later and took a week, etc. so we get a general feel for how long all the trips took and when and at what time of the year the trips were made. I read the book once and then found myself jumping back and forth to generate my own overview of the situation of what he did in terms of trips and dates. It is still not clear to myself. These are minor complaints but a better introduction/summary would help with simple English - constructive criticism - I hope.
Otherwise this is a great book, I am glad that I purchased the book. It shows what and where a novice can do to start, and what river to take, and how to plan a trip. Also it alerted me to the fact that the authors have other similar nature books.
4 Stars.
Jack in Toronto

Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter
Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter
by Thomas Cahill
Edition: Hardcover
45 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars The Author Could Do a Lot better, May 17 2004
I first read Thomas Cahill's book "How The Irish Saved Civilization" and I was very disappointed. I was very impressed with the author's knowledge of Greek and Roman history but thought that the book was weak, and in fact most of the book supposedly on Ireland was about Greek writings, etc.
So when I heard about this book I was quite interested in the book. He knows a lot of history and is well qualified but the book (again) seemed to be done under some sort of time constraint or deadline and seem to lack depth. I would be really impressed if he could sit down and put together a proper book on the subject of Greek and Roman history, maybe 600-800 pages long, and not have a series of these short "gimmick" books.
So I think it is just 3 stars.
My humble opinion.
Jack in Toronto

Atlas of World History
Atlas of World History
by Patrick K. O'Brien
Edition: Hardcover
13 used & new from CDN$ 30.69

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I Rate and Compare World History Atlas Books, May 16 2004
This review is from: Atlas of World History (Hardcover)
As a reader I like to have quick reference books at my finger tips including a new version of the Oxford English Dictionary about 3500 pages long - that I use almost daily. So I decided to add a "history atlas". In the process of doing my research I read the other amazon.com reviewers and then made three trips to two large book stores to actually look at the books and get a better feel for which was the best. I ended up buying the Oxford Atlas of World History. Here are my picks and rankings.
Listed by My ranking, #1 is the best, #2 is a creative alternative but no substitute.
1. Atlas of World History, Oxford University Press 2002, 368 pages, $57.80, 13.5" x 10.3" x 1.62" ranked 46,632 on Amazon.com. Hands down winner - professional - good text descriptions, outstanding maps and drawings, covers most things from the cave man forward. Negatives: Big and heavy. If you want to save a few dollars buy the "concise" version.

2. Creative alternative: The Penguin Atlas of World History, Penguin Books 2004, $11.20, just a paperback sized, just published, 304 pages. Surprisingly impressive, lots of text and pictures mixed together and it is easy to carry around. A nice quick alternative but it will be printed in two volumes.
.
3. Timelines of World History, DK Publishing 2002, 666 pages, $27.20. 10.0" x 1.6" ranked 25,800 on Amazon.com. Second with lots of value but in some ways not as comprehensive.
4. National Geographic Almanac of World History, National Geographic 2003, 384 pages, $28.00, 9.6" x 7.8" x 1.17" ranked 24,426 on Amazon.com. Similar to but less impressive than Oxford books. More text, narrower coverage, fewer maps and drawings.
5. DK Atlas of World History, DK Publishing, 352 pages, $35.00, 10.96" x 14.66" x 1.28" ranked 10,716 on Amazon.com. My last place book seems like a giant comic book. I love the DK travel books but this seems like one step beyond DK's area of expertise. Superficially it is similar to the Oxford book and it is cheap, and some might like it but it tries to be politically correct and fails.

6. Oxford Dictionary of World History, Oxford University Press, 704 pages, $7,66, pocketbook sized, sales rank 330,000. Mainly terms, people, and dates but has a few maps also. Limited use but an alternative. I prefer the new Penguin book but this is the best history dictionary to buy.
Jack in Toronto

Timelines Of World History
Timelines Of World History
by Dorling Kindersley
Edition: Hardcover
10 used & new from CDN$ 14.90

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I Rate and Compare World History Atlas Books, May 16 2004
As a reader I like to have quick reference books at my finger tips including a new version of the Oxford English Dictionary about 3500 pages long - that I use almost daily. So I decided to add a "history atlas". In the process of doing my research I read the other amazon.com reviewers and then made three trips to two large book stores to actually look at the books and get a better feel for which was the best. I ended up buying the Oxford Atlas of World History. Here are my picks and rankings.
Listed by My ranking, #1 is the best, #2 is a creative alternative but no substitute.
1. Atlas of World History, Oxford University Press 2002, 368 pages, $57.80, 13.5" x 10.3" x 1.62" ranked 46,632 on Amazon.com. Hands down winner - professional - good text descriptions, outstanding maps and drawings, covers most things from the cave man forward. Negatives: Big and heavy. If you want to save a few dollars buy the "concise" version.

2. Creative alternative: The Penguin Atlas of World History, Penguin Books 2004, $11.20, just a paperback sized, just published, 304 pages. Surprisingly impressive, lots of text and pictures mixed together and it is easy to carry around. A nice quick alternative but it will be printed in two volumes.
.
3. Timelines of World History, DK Publishing 2002, 666 pages, $27.20. 10.0" x 1.6" ranked 25,800 on Amazon.com. Second with lots of value but in some ways not as comprehensive.
4. National Geographic Almanac of World History, National Geographic 2003, 384 pages, $28.00, 9.6" x 7.8" x 1.17" ranked 24,426 on Amazon.com. Similar to but less impressive than Oxford books. More text, narrower coverage, fewer maps and drawings.
5. DK Atlas of World History, DK Publishing, 352 pages, $35.00, 10.96" x 14.66" x 1.28" ranked 10,716 on Amazon.com. My last place book seems like a giant comic book. I love the DK travel books but this seems like one step beyond DK's area of expertise. Superficially it is similar to the Oxford book and it is cheap, and some might like it but it tries to be politically correct and fails.

6. Oxford Dictionary of World History, Oxford University Press, 704 pages, $7,66, pocketbook sized, sales rank 330,000. Mainly terms, people, and dates but has a few maps also. Limited use but an alternative. I prefer the new Penguin book but this is the best history dictionary to buy.
Jack in Toronto

National Geographic Almanac of World History
National Geographic Almanac of World History
by Pat Daniels
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 39.69
32 used & new from CDN$ 4.67

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I Rate and Compare World History Atlas Books, May 16 2004
As a reader I like to have quick reference books at my finger tips including a new version of the Oxford English Dictionary about 3500 pages long - that I use almost daily. So I decided to add a "history atlas". In the process of doing my research I read the other amazon.com reviewers and then made three trips to two large book stores to actually look at the books and get a better feel for which was the best. I ended up buying the Oxford Atlas of World History. Here are my picks and rankings.
Listed by My ranking, #1 is the best, #2 is a creative alternative but no substitute.
1. Atlas of World History, Oxford University Press 2002, 368 pages, $57.80, 13.5" x 10.3" x 1.62" ranked 46,632 on Amazon.com. Hands down winner - professional - good text descriptions, outstanding maps and drawings, covers most things from the cave man forward. Negatives: Big and heavy. If you want to save a few dollars buy the "concise" version.

2. Creative alternative: The Penguin Atlas of World History, Penguin Books 2004, $11.20, just a paperback sized, just published, 304 pages. Surprisingly impressive, lots of text and pictures mixed together and it is easy to carry around. A nice quick alternative but it will be printed in two volumes.
.
3. Timelines of World History, DK Publishing 2002, 666 pages, $27.20. 10.0" x 1.6" ranked 25,800 on Amazon.com. Second with lots of value but in some ways not as comprehensive.
4. National Geographic Almanac of World History, National Geographic 2003, 384 pages, $28.00, 9.6" x 7.8" x 1.17" ranked 24,426 on Amazon.com. Similar to but less impressive than Oxford books. More text, narrower coverage, fewer maps and drawings.
5. DK Atlas of World History, DK Publishing, 352 pages, $35.00, 10.96" x 14.66" x 1.28" ranked 10,716 on Amazon.com. My last place book seems like a giant comic book. I love the DK travel books but this seems like one step beyond DK's area of expertise. Superficially it is similar to the Oxford book and it is cheap, and some might like it but it tries to be politically correct and fails.

6. Oxford Dictionary of World History, Oxford University Press, 704 pages, $7,66, pocketbook sized, sales rank 330,000. Mainly terms, people, and dates but has a few maps also. Limited use but an alternative. I prefer the new Penguin book but this is the best history dictionary to buy.
Jack in Toronto

Atlas Of World History
Atlas Of World History
by Dorling Kindersley
Edition: Hardcover
12 used & new from CDN$ 15.29

3.0 out of 5 stars I Rate and Compare World History Atlas Books, May 16 2004
This review is from: Atlas Of World History (Hardcover)
As a reader I like to have quick reference books at my finger tips including a new version of the Oxford English Dictionary about 3500 pages long - that I use almost daily. So I decided to add a "history atlas". In the process of doing my research I read the other amazon.com reviewers and then made three trips to two large book stores to actually look at the books and get a better feel for which was the best. I ended up buying the Oxford Atlas of World History. Here are my picks and rankings.
Listed by My ranking, #1 is the best, #2 is a creative alternative but no substitute.
1. Atlas of World History, Oxford University Press 2002, 368 pages, $57.80, 13.5" x 10.3" x 1.62" ranked 46,632 on Amazon.com. Hands down winner - professional - good text descriptions, outstanding maps and drawings, covers most things from the cave man forward. Negatives: Big and heavy. If you want to save a few dollars buy the "concise" version.

2. Creative alternative: The Penguin Atlas of World History, Penguin Books 2004, $11.20, just a paperback sized, just published, 304 pages. Surprisingly impressive, lots of text and pictures mixed together and it is easy to carry around. A nice quick alternative but it will be printed in two volumes.
.
3. Timelines of World History, DK Publishing 2002, 666 pages, $27.20. 10.0" x 1.6" ranked 25,800 on Amazon.com. Second with lots of value but in some ways not as comprehensive.
4. National Geographic Almanac of World History, National Geographic 2003, 384 pages, $28.00, 9.6" x 7.8" x 1.17" ranked 24,426 on Amazon.com. Similar to but less impressive than Oxford books. More text, narrower coverage, fewer maps and drawings.
5. DK Atlas of World History, DK Publishing, 352 pages, $35.00, 10.96" x 14.66" x 1.28" ranked 10,716 on Amazon.com. My 4th or 5th place book seems like a giant comic book. I love the DK travel books but this seems like one step beyond DK's area of expertise. Superficially it is similar to the Oxford book and it is cheaper to buy, and some might like it but it tries to be politically correct and fails.

6. Oxford Dictionary of World History, Oxford University Press, 704 pages, $7,66, pocketbook sized, sales rank 330,000. Mainly terms, people, and dates but has a few maps also. Limited use but an alternative. I prefer the new Penguin book but this is the best history dictionary to buy.
Jack in Toronto

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