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H. E. Yang (New York, NY United States)
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Contrarian Investment Strategies: The Classic Edition
Contrarian Investment Strategies: The Classic Edition
by David Dreman
Edition: Hardcover
44 used & new from CDN$ 2.46

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Correct premise, but boring, good for novices, Dec 5 2003
The basic principles of this book could be boiled down to a paragraph, but Dreman spends more than 400 pages. I agree with contrarian investing, so this book is an essential read if you're a novice, in school, or maybe just starting to risk capital, but not recommended for experienced professionals. A plus is that the book offers practical advice and real life examples, but it is somewhat dated since it was written pre-Internet crash. Another warning is that this book is extremely dry and reads like an academic textbook--reminds me of AIMR's Financial Analyst's Journal, but not as substantive.

Conquer the Crash - You Can Survive and Prosper in a Deflationary Depression
Conquer the Crash - You Can Survive and Prosper in a Deflationary Depression
by Robert R. Prechter
Edition: Hardcover
41 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, especially for banking system insights, Dec 4 2003
First, obviously Prechter has been very wrong this year, not just on his predictions about the stock market but also his bearish views on gold. This is true both for this book and his newsletter. Still, this book is terrific, and offers valuable insight into how our fiat currency and banking system actually works. Prechter also presents good historical background on what happened during past crashes, and his social commentary is always fun to read. I'm not that keen on Elliott Wave theory, so I mostly glossed over those parts. There are also very practical advice on where to buy gold, bonds, etc., which would be useful to novices.

Adventure Capitalist: The Ultimate Road Trip
Adventure Capitalist: The Ultimate Road Trip
by Jim Rogers
Edition: Hardcover
40 used & new from CDN$ 0.53

4.0 out of 5 stars A great guide to common sense investing, Dec 3 2003
I really enjoyed Jim Rogers' sarcastic sense of humor, but aside from the entertaining prose, the book really offers some eye-opening insight into how well intentioned financial aid administered to third world countries actually have very corrosive effects on those economies. For example, in Ethiopia, Rogers observes that clothing donated to that country by church groups in the U.S. are all routinely diverted by private third parties that take ownership of those goods in transit and sell them at rock bottom prices (their costs are zero) in Ethiopia, undercutting the local merchants and driving them out of business. Same thing for farm aid; despite being a net exporter of food for thousands of years, because of international farm aid, Rogers notes that Ethiopians have no incentive to farm anymore. Overall, he makes a good case for adhering to sound economics and not distorting the laws of capitalism. Rogers' accounts of China, Russia, and Korea are also very instructive. The book is also sprinkled with numerous nuggets of common sense investing principles. A very good read that balances entertainment with substance.

The Mind of Wall Street: A Legendary Financier on the Perils of Greed and the Mysteries of the Market
The Mind of Wall Street: A Legendary Financier on the Perils of Greed and the Mysteries of the Market
by Leon Levy
Edition: Hardcover
27 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining, but not very informative, Dec 3 2003
I generally agree with Leon Levy's thesis that behavioral finance moves markets and stocks. It took me a while to grasp this idea after 4 years of Wharton where market efficiency and investors' rationality were expounded. Working as a practioner on Wall Street and living through the recent Internet bubble and subsequent collapse has taught me the value of respecting the effect of investors' psychology on stock prices. That said, I found this book disappointing. Some of Levy's economic and finance theories are dubious, and there were few ideas on how to actually make money from shifting investors' sentiment. Still, the book only took me a couple of hours to read (large print, 200 pages), and it did have some interesting anecdotes. All in all, it's pretty light-weight fare, and ok for a quick browse.

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