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bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas)
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In Search of the Trojan War
In Search of the Trojan War
by Michael Wood
Edition: Paperback
10 used & new from CDN$ 31.25

5.0 out of 5 stars Can't' find Troy you do not have this book, April 24 2016
Michael Wood is the author of many a great history subject books that eventually turns in to excellent PBS series. There are quite a few people in the world that watch PBS and have no idea what they are missing by not purchasing the companion books.

For the visual people that are plenty of pictures and graphs. Accompanying them are excellent descriptions. Let's go along with Michael as we travel through time and distance. Do not forget to slow down when we get to Schliemann.

Contents:
The Search for Troy
Heinrich Schliemann
The Coming of the Greeks
Homer: The Singer of Tales
Agamemnon's Empire
A Forgotten Empire: The Hittites and the Greeks
The Peoples of the Sea
Conclusions: The end of the Bronze Age

A Question of Honor
A Question of Honor
by Charles Todd
Edition: Hardcover
6 used & new from CDN$ 27.30

5.0 out of 5 stars The best Bess Crawford mystery, April 24 2016
This review is from: A Question of Honor (Hardcover)
This is the fifth in the series. So by now you should be acquainted with the characters, by this unique mother and son team.

We are now in the last year of the war and everyone is speculating what Bess will do now that she is no longer going to be a nurse.

She is working in and aid station where they receive the wended men. There she finds that her history in India allows her to converse with a wounded Indian Sergeant. There he finds that he had seen Lieutenant Wade a person of interest from her father's regiment. The story can get a tad complex to convey on this review. However this person had a nefarious background and was wanted for various deeds. She wants to track him down and find the truth.

I have to admit that my first read form Charles Todd was the Ian Rutledge Mysteries. Guess I'll have to try "the Murder Stone".

The Wasp Woman (1959) Classic Sci-fi and Horror Movie DVD-R
The Wasp Woman (1959) Classic Sci-fi and Horror Movie DVD-R
DVD ~ Anthony Eisley

3.0 out of 5 stars Maintaining that wasp waist, April 24 2016
Janice Starlin (Susan Cabot) head of a cosmetics company was told the she needs to stay young to promote the product. What can she do? Enter garage scientist Eric Zinthrop (Michael Mark) with a dubious formula made from wasp royal jelly. He explains that "just a little dab will do you." She gets greedy and shoots up with the extra strong stuff. This gives her a BUZZ and can have biting consequences.

In Search of The Trojan War
In Search of The Trojan War
by Michael Wood
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
10 used & new from CDN$ 24.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Can't' find Troy you do not have this book, April 24 2016
Michael Wood is the author of many a great history subject books that eventually turns in to excellent PBS series. There are quite a few people in the world that watch PBS and have no idea what they are missing by not purchasing the companion books.

For the visual people that are plenty of pictures and graphs. Accompanying them are excellent descriptions. Let's go along with Michael as we travel through time and distance. Do not forget to slow down when we get to Schliemann.

Contents:
The Search for Troy
Heinrich Schliemann
The Coming of the Greeks
Homer: The Singer of Tales
Agamemnon's Empire
A Forgotten Empire: The Hittites and the Greeks
The Peoples of the Sea
Conclusions: The end of the Bronze Age

Hot Blooded Dinosaurs
Hot Blooded Dinosaurs
by Adrian Desmond
Edition: Hardcover
2 used & new from CDN$ 35.92

5.0 out of 5 stars There'll be a hot time on the old veldt tonight, April 24 2016
This review is from: Hot Blooded Dinosaurs (Hardcover)
Our understanding of history and technology is constantly changing. At one time the Maya Indians were thought to be peaceful people and we ignored all their bloody pictures.

This information is a tad dated but the book "the hot-blooded dinosaurs" by Adrian J. Desmond was one of those books that changed our understanding and was a revolution in paleontology.

The premise of this book is the theory that dinosaurs were warm-blooded creatures. It sets out methodically to show why this was so.

Contents:
1 - the crown of creation
2 - the tyrant finds its feet
3 - the race is to the swift, the battle to the strong
4 - the dark ages
5 - stranding of the Titans
6 - a Griffin rescues evolution
7 - phantoms from hell
8 - the coming of Armageddon: a cosmic cataclysm?

The book contains drawings of what the dinosaurs would look like and actually pictures of their skeletons.

No Title Available

5.0 out of 5 stars Let Go of My Eggo, April 24 2016
A territory is an area of space which an animal guards as its exclusive possession and which it will defend against all members of its kind. Of course we didn't need somebody to tell us that. Yet in 1996 we did need a book, this one as part of popular science of the time to open our eyes to this phenomenon and what it means to us.

Look closer at the subtitle and you too will still be interested "A Personal Inquiry into the Origins of Property and Nations (biological nations)."

Robert Arderey American playwright and screenwriter does what we all do (well most of us) and dives into the anthropology of his day. Therefore this is a great book to see what the general view or at least one person's insight was in the 1960's.

Now of course with hind sight there are plenty of contradictory theories and writings. But we should not overlook this gem.

This book also includes drawings by Berdine Ardrey, an extensive bibliography, and index.

Lucy: The Beginnings of Humankind
Lucy: The Beginnings of Humankind
by Donald C. Johanson
Edition: Paperback
13 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars I love Lucy, April 24 2016
Oh no Richard E. Leakey move over for Donald Johanson, who discovered Lucy (AUSTRALOPITHECUS AFARENSIS) opening up a whole new chapter, or book on the History of the human species.

The book its self has a small section of color pictures. There are black and white illustrations of key points and charts. Peppered throughout the book there are monochrome pictures.

I found chapter 3 the most intriguing on what is Lucy. The pull the John the teeth apart put them back together pull them apart again until you know what Lucy really is.

There's an extensive index and a useful bibliography.

You will want to own this book just for technical literacy and to be able to compare and contrast to other writers on the subject.

The Heroes of Asgard - Tales from Scandinavian Mythology - The Original Classic Edition
The Heroes of Asgard - Tales from Scandinavian Mythology - The Original Classic Edition
by Annie Keary
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 20.04

5.0 out of 5 stars Part of the English Literature Series, April 24 2016
Evidently, when they wrote the Edda (12thC Norse poem collection) (13thC Norse poem collection compiled by Snorri Sturluson, Containing Norse myths, poems, and treatise on poetry) they were not aware of English. However, there is no excuse for the later translations.

If you want to know the gods and their story, but have no time to cut though exotic lengthy prose, then this is the book for you. The stories are straight forwarded and have a contemporary feel. Still they are of the time and place they should be and not superimposed on today's century.

The illustrations add a dimension to the stories. Being in a sketch form adds to your imagination and helps explain some concepts.

Origins : what new discoveries reveal about the emergence of our species and its possible future by Richard E. Leakey (30-May-1905) Hardcover
Origins : what new discoveries reveal about the emergence of our species and its possible future by Richard E. Leakey (30-May-1905) Hardcover
by Richard E. Leakey
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Revolutionary when it was first published, April 24 2016
An excellent book on the emergence of our species. Of course I assume that the person reading this review is of the same species. For anyone who has not read this book it still holds some interesting ideas that should not be missed. It is packed with pictures and graphs and as Alice of Alice in Wonderland fame said "What good are books without pictures and conversations?"

This book makes a great addition to your library and worth rereading about once every 10 years to see how things are changed (or haven't.)

Be sure to read Richard E. Leakey's other books on the subject.

Iliad (Translated by William Cowper)
Iliad (Translated by William Cowper)
Price: CDN$ 1.30

5.0 out of 5 stars The ground is dark with blood, April 24 2016
With many books, translations are negligible, with two obvious exceptions, one is the Bible, and surprisingly the other is The Iliad. Each translation can give a different insight and feel to the story. Everyone will have a favorite. I have several.

For example:

"Rage--Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus’ son Achilles,
Murderous, doomed, that cost the Achaeans countless losses,
hurling down to the House of Death so many souls,
great fighters’ souls. But made their bodies carrion,
feasts for dogs and birds,
and the will of Zeus was moving towards its end.
Begin, Muse, when the two first broke and clashed,
Agamemnon lord of men and brilliant Achilles."
-Translated by Robert Fagles, 1990

“Sing, O Goddess, the anger of Achilles, son of Peleus, that brought countless ills upon the Achaeans. Many a brave soul did it send hurrying down to Hades, and many a heroes did it yield a prey to dogs and vultures for so were the counsels of Zeus fulfilled from the day on which the son of Atreus, king of men, and great Achilles first fell out with one another.”
-Translated by Samuel Butler, 1888

“Rage:
Sing, Goddess, Achilles’ rage,
Black and murderous, that cost the Greeks
Incalculable pain pitched countless souls
Of heroes into Hades’ dark,
And let their bodies rot as feasts
For dogs and birds, as Zeus’ will was done.
Begin with the clash between Agamemnon—
The Greek Warlord—and godlike Achilles.”
-Translated by Stanley Lombardo, 1997

“Anger be now your song, immortal one,
Akhilleus’ anger, doomed and ruinous,
that caused the Akhaians loss on bitter loss
and crowded brave souls into the undergloom,
leaving so many dead men—carrion
for dogs and birds; and the will of Zeus was done.
Begin it when the two men first contending
broke with one another—
the Lord Marshal Agamémnon, Atreus’ son, and Prince Akhilleus.”
-Translated by Translated by Robert Fitzgerald, 1963

“Sing, goddess, the anger of Peleus’ son of Achilleus and its devastation, which puts pains thousandfold upon the Achains,
hurled in the multitudes to the house of Hades strong souls of heroes, but gave their bodies to be the delicate feasting of dogs, of all birds, and the will of Zeus was accomplished since that time when first there stood the division of conflict Atrecus’ son the lord of men and brilliant Achilleus.”
–Translated by Richmond Lattimore, 1951

“Sing, goddess, of Peleus’ son Achilles’ anger, ruinous, that caused the Greeks untold ordeals, consigned to Hades countless valiant souls, heroes, and left their bodies prey for dogs or feast for vultures. Zeus’s will was done from when those two first quarreled and split apart, the king, Agamemnon, and matchless Achilles.”
-Translated by Herbert Jordan, 2008

“An angry man-there is my story: the bitter rancor of Achillês, prince of the house of Peleus, which brought a thousand troubles upon the Achaian host. Many a strong soul it sent down to Hadês, and left the heroes themselves a prey to the dogs and carrion birds, while the will of God moved on to fulfillment.”
-Translated and transliterated by W.H.D. Rouse, 1950

“Achilles’ wrath, to Greece the direful spring
Of woes unnumber’d, heavenly goddess, sing!
That wrath which hurl’d to Pluto’s gloomy reign
The souls of mighty chiefs untimely slain;
Whose limbs unburied on the naked shore,
Devouring dogs and hungry vultures tore.
Since great Achilles and Atrides strove,
Such was the sovereign doom,
and such the will of Jove!”
-Translated by Alexander Pope, 1720

“Achilles sing, O Goddess! Peleus’ son;
His wrath pernicious, who ten thousand woes
Caused to Achaia’s host, sent many a soul
Illustrious into Ades premature,
And Heroes gave (so stood the will of Jove)
To dogs and to all ravening fowls a prey,
When fierce dispute had separated once
The noble Chief Achilles from the son
Of Atreus, Agamemnon, King of men.”
-Translated by William Cowper, London 1791

“Achilles’ baneful wrath – resound, O goddess – that impos’d
Infinite sorrow on the Greeks, and the brave souls loos’d
From beasts heroic; sent them far, to that invisible cave*
That no light comforts; and their limbs to dogs and vultures gave:
To all which Jove’s will give effect; from whom the first strife begun
Betwixt Atrides, king of men, and Thetis’ godlike son*”
-Translated by George Chapman, 1616

“The Rage of Achilles—sing it now, goddess, sing through me
the deadly rage that caused the Achaeans such grief
and hurled down to Hades the souls of so many fighters,
leaving their naked flesh to be eaten by dogs
and carrion birds, as the will of Zeus was accomplished.
Begin at the time when bitter words first divided
that king of men, Agamemnon, and godlike Achilles.”
-Translated by Stephen Mitchell

“Sing now, goddess, the wrath of Achilles the scion of Peleus,
ruinous rage which brought the Achaians uncounted afflictions;
many of the powerful souls it sent to the dwelling of Hades,
those of the heroes, and spoil for the dogs it made it their bodies,
plunder for the birds, and the purpose of Zeus was accomplished__”
-Translated by Rodney Merrill

“Sing, goddess, the anger of Achilles, Peleus’ son,
the accused anger which brought the Achaeans countless
agonies and hurled many mighty shades of heroes into Hades,
causing them to become the prey of dogs
and all kinds of birds; and the plan of Zeus was fulfilled.”
-Translated by Anthony Verity
Antony does not attempt to be poetic. The line numbers are close to the original.

“Of Peleus’ son, Achilles, sing, O Muse,
The vengeance, deep and deadly; whence to Greece
Unnumbered ills arose; which many a soul
Of mighty warriors to the viewless shades
Ultimately sent; they on the battle plain
Unburied lay, to rav’ning dogs,
And carrion birds; but had Jove decreed,”
-Translated by Edward Smith-Stanly 1862

“Sing, Goddess of the rage of Achilles, son of Peleus-
that murderous anger witch condemned Achaeans
to countless agonies and threw many warrior souls
deep into Hades, leaving their dead bodies
carrion food for dogs and birds-
all in the fulfillment of the will of Zeus”
- Translated by Professor Ian Johnston, British Columbia 2006

“The rage, sing O goddess, of Achilles, son of Peleus,
The destructive anger that brought ten-thousand pains to the
Achaeans and sent many brave souls of fighting men to the house
of Hades and made their bodies a feast for dogs
and all kinds of birds. For such was the will of Zeus.”
- Translated by Barry B. Powell

“Wrath, goddess, sing of Achilles Pēleus’s son’s calamitous wrath, which hit the Achaians countless ills many the valiant souls it saw off down to Hādēs, souls of heroes, their selves left as carrion for dogs and all birds of prey, and the plan of Zeus was fulfilled from the first moment those two men parted in fury, Atreus’s son, king of men, and the godlike Achilles.”
-Translated by Peter Green

“Sing, goddess, the wrath of Achilles Peleus' son, the ruinous wrath that brought on the Achaians woes innumerable, and hurled down into Hades many strong souls of heroes, and gave their bodies to be a prey to dogs and all winged fowls; and so the counsel of Zeus wrought out its accomplishment from the day when first strife parted Atreides king of men and noble Achilles.”
- Translated by Andrew Lang, M.A., Walter Leaf, Litt.D., And Ernest Myers, M.A.
Books I. - IX. . . . . W. Leaf.
" X. - XVI. . . . . A. Lang.
" XVII. - XXIV. . . . . E. Myers.

Another translation is by Ennis Samuel Rees, Jr. (March 17, 1925 – March 24, 2009)

Greek Latin
——- ——-
Zeus. Jupiter.
Hera. Juno.
(Pallas) Athene. Minerva.
Aphrodite. Venus.
Poseidon. Neptune.
Ares. Mars.
Hephaestus. Vulcan.
--------
Wrath–sing, goddess, of the ruinous wrath of Peleus’ son Achilles,
that inflicted woes without number upon the Achaeans,
hurled fourth two Hades many strong souls of warriors
and rendered their bodies prey for the dogs,
for all birds, and the will of Zeus was accomplished;
sing from when they to first stood in conflict-
Ateus’ son, lord of men, and godlike Achilles.
-Translated by Caroline Alexander

You will find that some translations are easier to read but others are easier to listen to on recordings, lectures, Kindle, and the like. If you do not see information on specific translators, it is still worth the speculation and purchase. Right after the translation readability and understanding, do not overlook the introduction which gives an inset to what you are about to read.

The Stephen Mitchell translation goes though each of the major characters so well that you think you know them before you starts reading. Other introductions explain the struggle between different types of power. Rodney Merrill’s 28 page introduction focuses on singing.

The Peter Green translation is easy to read. It is almost a transliteration. However it is the all the scholarly supplemental information that give worth to his contribution.

The Oxford University Press Barry B. Powell has an extensive introduction with real “MAPS”. Also there is information of the finder Schliemann. We even get annotation on the meaning being conveyed.

The Caroline Alexander Translation is most excellent for a first translation reading. While other translation rely so much on being scholarly, her translation with plenty of white space make you feel that you are partaking in listening in awe. The only thing missing is the background music.

Our story takes place in the ninth year of the ongoing war. We get some introduction to the first nine years but they are just a background to this tale of pride, sorrow and revenge. The story will also end abruptly before the end of the war.

We have the wide conflict between the Trojans and Achaeans over a matter of pride; the gods get to take sides and many times direct spears and shields.

Although the more focused conflict is the power struggle between two different types of power. That of Achilles, son of Peleus and the greatest individual warrior and that of Agamemnon, lord of men, whose power comes form position.

We are treated to a blow by blow inside story as to what each is thinking and an unvarnished description of the perils of war and the search for Arête (to be more like Aries, God of War.)

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