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D Glover (northern bc, canada)
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Bonhoeffer
Bonhoeffer
by Eric Metaxas
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 36.61
27 used & new from CDN$ 21.69

5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping story of an extraordinary life, July 10 2014
This review is from: Bonhoeffer (Hardcover)
This is a very engaging account of a very interesting life. Bonhoeffer was a complex character who lived in complex times. As a theologian, he laboured on the battle ground between liberalism and biblical orthodoxy. As a German, he lived in the stormy years of the Great War, the injustice and depression of the interwar years, and the rise and fall of one of the most evil political and ideological regimes of the 20th century, Nazism. As a pastor, mentor and teacher, he helped train people to minister while he himself ministered to souls (from troubled children to blue collar congregations to intellectual elites to seminarians to fellow prisoners). As a German, he struggled to remain faithful to his nation while opposing the evil ideology of the Nazis from the earliest days in every way he could both at home and abroad. To say he lived in tumultuous times is gross understatement.

Any version of Bonhoeffer's life or any assessment of his theology that doesn't take into account the complexities of his ecclesiastical and historical-political context is going to paint a warped caricature. To a certain extent, because of the incompleteness of his own work (he died too young to have fully developed his own theological ideas) and the unevenness of the sources (there are only patchy details about certain parts of his life and work, and of course his own letters and the reports of his family and friends won't give a full-orbed picture), any biography will, at least at some points, be a project in interpretation rather than objective reporting. In fact, because of the incompleteness of Bonhoeffer's theology, it has made him an easy project for both liberals and conservatives to adopt and, reading him in light of their own contemporary debates, mold to fit their own agendas and argue for their own side. This has been done too frequently to the point that there are two Bonhoeffers out their and they often don't sound much like one another. Even though Metaxas will no doubt be accused of claiming Bonhoeffer for the "conservatives" and "evangelicals", he provides some balance to the image that liberals have tried to paint of Bonhoeffer, even if the balance comes in the form of a pendulum swing possibly slightly too far in the other direction.

But Metaxas certainly is right to reclaim Bonhoeffer as a personal disciple of Christ, one who loved God, believed his Word, followed Christ personally and lovingly shepherded his church. Too often liberals have tried to claim Bonhoeffer and his "religionless Christianity" as supporting their godless Christianity. They simply attempt to coopt the heroic Bonhoeffer in their project to maintain the ethic of the man Jesus even as they empty Jesus of his moral authority as God incarnate, the central pillar in their attempt to make Christian morality relevant to a secular scientific age that has rejected notions of the supernatural. But Bonhoeffer was a follower of the Jesus of divine revelation and a passionate student of Scripture. He preached the gospel of the cross and faced his imprisonment with courage and his execution by the Gestapo with the hope of the resurrection because his faith rested in the resurrected and sovereign Lord Jesus.

There are minor issues with editing in perhaps 6 or 8 places. Little typos (doubled words, misspellings, etc.) which make it look like final editing might have been rushed, especially toward the end of the book. Also, in the final pages, Metaxas makes a dramatic point that the text which Bishop George Bell, a friend of Bonhoeffer and fellow worker in the ecumenical movement and anti-Nazi efforts of the Confessing Church, used for his sermon at Bonhoeffer's memorial service in London was none other than one from the Sermon on the Mount, the passage from Matthew that forms the basis of Bonhoeffer's great book, The Cost of Discipleship. However, the passage isn't from the Sermon on the Mount but from Jesus' commissioning of his disciples in Matthew 10 as he sends them out to preach the kingdom. This is a slip-up to be sure, but nothing to diminish this engaging biography which, in most places, moves along at the pace of a good novel.

This biography has done for me what all good biographies ought to do: it has made me appreciate the person of Bonhoeffer more than I previously did, it has made me feel like I know him much better than I did, and it has sparked in me the desire to know him better through other biographies and through his own works. I highly recommend it to all and I'd give it 4.5 stars.

Why Our Church Switched to the ESV
Why Our Church Switched to the ESV
Price: CDN$ 4.10

4.0 out of 5 stars Why switch Bible translations?, June 16 2014
When I was in Bible college (quite some time ago now), I switched away from using the NIV largely due to four factors. Firstly, I took 8 semesters of Greek and (regrettably, only) one of Hebrew, but that was enough to demonstrate to me that the NIV was so very often doing as much interpretation as it was translation. Secondly, as I was studying passages and books of the Bible and was turning to the best of the commentaries, I found that the commentators were spending a goodish bit of time explaining why the NIV doesn't translate a particular passage all that well and what it ought really to be saying. Third, as I was doing my own translation and sentence diagramming work, I was coming to the same conclusions. And forth, in my preaching and teaching (I stayed on to teach for a year) I didn't like the fact that I was having to "unteach" so many passages from the NIV before going on to explain what they really say. I switched for a time to the NASB, which is a helpful version for serious study but which is a pretty clunky translation for everyday reading. For many people, including children, reading the NASB is a bit like eating 3/4 inch gravel in chalk dust sauce. Then I switched to the NKJV which was better but still not ideal (for a few reasons). Then the ESV showed up during my time in church ministry and I found it to be the best balance of accurate translation and readability thus far.

This little book by Kevin DeYoung is so short and to the point that if I make this review any longer, I'll just be restating his arguments in my own words. I am grateful for this little booklet and commend it as very useful. Don't worry if you are a faithful NIV (or other translation) user. DeYoung still holds to the belief that the best Bible is the one you actually read. God can and does work through many translations. However, when it came time to pick a "pew" and preaching Bible for our church, we went with the ESV for many of the reasons DeYoung points out. The ESV attempts to be a readable and essentially literal translation rather than doing so much interpretation.

This leads me to an additional reason I switched to the ESV, but was not part of my Bible school experience. If God chose to state certain things in an ambiguous way, or in a way which could legitimately be understood in more than one sense and still fit the context of the passage, the book and the Scriptures overall, who is a committee of translators to decide what God meant (or didn't mean)? If the author was supernatural, why should His book conform to our "only one true interpretation of any given text" model? [And no, I'm not saying all interpretations are legitimate.] Read this even if you don't think its relevant to your situation and even if you already use the ESV but couldn't tell someone else why.

Sabbath as Resistance: Saying No in the Culture of Now
Sabbath as Resistance: Saying No in the Culture of Now
by Walter Brueggemann
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 17.55
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Resisting the god of consumerism & the liturgy of busyness, June 3 2014
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There are some truly great insights in this book. The theme of Sabbath as Resistance to the break-neck pace of life and unending pursuit of material wealth and achievement is a message the church of our day (particularly the North American church) needs to take to heart. This book is (thankfully) not a legalistic volume of "thou shalt nots", nor does it spiritualize away the meaning of Sabbath rest - it really means resting from our labours. The Sabbath is a call to resist the dehumanizing gods of perpetual frenzy and to actively trust God rather than the unceasing work of our hands and the limits of our credit cards, to provide our needs.

Keeping Sabbath rest is a powerful witness in the midst of a culture that never seems to slow down and that is always working, always buying, always acquiring, always on the go - what the author calls a culture or economy of "acquisitiveness". Brueggemann looks primarily to Exodus, Deuteronomy, Isaiah, and Amos to argue that Sabbath is resistance to anxiety, coercion, exclusivism and multitasking. There are many great insights into the frenetic and destructive nature of our daily lives and into the balance and perspective that Sabbath provides. Brueggemann contrasts the Mosaic command of Sabbath rest with the command of Pharaoh and the gods of Egypt to unceasing labour and ever-increasing production. He further draws the parallel between YHWH's example of rest, which was to be imitated by humanity, with that of the pagan gods who always demand bigger, stronger, faster, more, etc., because they are insecure and must force others down to elevate themselves. As YHWH called Israel out of a culture of slavery to the system of unending forced labour to build the Egyptian empire, so God still calls his people out of the materialistic cultural ethos of the day to rest and trust to his provision of their needs. Arguing from Deut., Isaiah and Amos, Brueggemann calls the reader to covenant "neighbourliness" rather than commoditization of people, with the ensuing enmity, constant competition, inhumanity, violence, etc., that entails. Brueggemann calls the church to reject the acquisitive nature of our culture and economy (constantly producing and acquiring more) and to return to the practice of Sabbath rest as a way of imaging YHWH and resisting the modern gods of materialism, power, violence and coercion which would enslave everyone. I agree with much of what the author has to say here, even if I think he presents a rather unbalanced picture since without an accompanying theology of work one could walk away with an unbiblical and perpetually negative view of labour, work ethic, competition, etc. Our current culture also has an unbiblical view of rest, exchanging it for leisure/pleasure, often striving frenetically so that we can waste time on empty time wasters. Hopefully this will not be the only work one reads on Sabbath. I believe that this is a much needed message for a church that is often very confused about Sabbath observance, if not completely ignorant of it. While this is certainly not all that needs to be said about the Sabbath, it is definitely valuable and often prophetic (imagine calling church families to forgo Sunday sports for worship and rest with God's people!...that's enough to get you thrown naked into a pit).

However, as Brueggemann expands on this theme, it becomes increasingly clear that he views the wealthy and powerful captains of industry, banking elite, free-market capitalists, etc., as the ones who most resemble Pharaoh and the slave-driving Egyptian gods. While he is certainly correct that very often these groups are guilty of fostering a culture of acquisitiveness and greedily demanding unending production, he fails to balance the picture with the fact that there are consumers out there who, just as greedily, continue to purchase and acquire. If modern capitalist producers are the present day Pharaohs, then modern consumers are willingly enslaved because we want the leeks and onions that Pharaoh hands out. Also, while it is wrong to steal, it is not wrong to gain wealth trough lawful trade. Brueggemann seems to look for regulations to limit the acquisitiveness of our modern society and apparently hopes redistribution of wealth will mitigate materialism, care for the needy and bring about neighbourliness as a replacement the dehumanizing commoditization of people. This seems to me to be a big blind spot in his diagnosis of the problem as well as his prescription of a solution. While he recognizes the place of Sabbath, of rest, and of trusting God to provide (in the teachings of both the the OT and NT), he seems to want government to regulate how much the wealthy classes can accumulate, how much industry is allowed to expect from labour, and hopes to thereby curb greed. But government seems to me to be the worst offender of all when it comes to commoditizing people and fostering greed. For all his talk of resistance to the traditional power structures of our society, the author seems too trusting of the biggest traditional power holder of all, socialist and redistributionist governments and their multi-layered bureaucracy of regulators. Brueggemann sees capitalism as the equivalent of Pharaonic Egypt, but it could be more accurately argued that modern socialist and centralist governments (rather than the so-called free market which actually doesn't currently exist), are the more consistent and direct comparison. Brueggemann rightly identifies covetousness as the opposite spirit to the spirit of Sabbath rest. However, more than once he speaks of those in power and those with affluence as the ones perennially guilty of covetousness and of commoditization of life and thereby trampling the rights of the needy. This is not a fair picture of the outworking of the sin of covetousness. Sometimes the very passages he quotes to argue his point, that those in power covetously prey on the poor and needy and commoditize people and creation, prove that covetousness is actually a sin that all people, regardless of socio-economic standing, are guilty of. In presenting the covetousness inherent in an acquisitive economy which tramples the "rights of the needy" Brueggemann quotes Jeremiah 6:13 and argues that the prophet is accusing the "urban leadership", "from priest to prophet", of preying on and dealing falsely with the rural agrarian populations. Jeremiah shows that it was very often the civic/spiritual leadership that, in their greed and covetousness, preyed on the people. The problem is that Brueggemann speaks as though it is only leadership and the affluent who covet, whereas Jeremiah 6:13 plainly says, "From the least to the greatest of them, everyone is greedy for unjust gain; and from prophet to priest, everyone deals falsely." Note the double use of "everyone". In many places which Brueggemann sees the leaders, the power holders, and the affluent as the greedy and covetous ones, the Bible sees all people as guilty of the sins of greed and covetousness. The command against covetousness and the command to keep the Sabbath were given for everyone because these are areas of sin toward which everyone is prone - "from the least of them to the greatest, everyone is greedy for unjust gain". One recalls the Israelites in their wilderness wandering, greedily remembering the onions and leeks of Egypt and wanting to trade their freedom for slavery once again because they were dissatisfied with mannah and quail. This was not the sin of the leaders but of the people. Also, once in the land, it was not just the leaders who forgot that the houses they did not build and the fields and orchards they did not plant were all a gift from God. In their complacent comfort, the whole nation forgot what God had done for them and simply accumulated and basked in their wealth, turned to idols, ignoring the wellbeing of their neighbours as they had first forgotten the mercy of God. Both in their dissatisfaction in the wilderness and in their over-stuffed comfort of the promised land, all the people fell into covetousness and greed. The sins of greed, covetousness, and lack of faith in God's ability to provide are not sins which reside only in socio-economic structures but live first and foremost in the selfish and sinful human heart. It is just as covetous and greedy for the government to look to the resources of the wealthy and want to tax them exorbitantly and redistribute the wealth as it is for wealthy captains of industry to set up unsafe factories and fill them with child labour to increase their profit margin. The poor man who plans how he can confiscate and redistribute the wealth of the "haves" is just as greedy as the rich industrialist who plans how he can increase his profit margin by abuse of the "have nots". Both men selfishly bow to the god of mammon in the liturgy of covetousness. Failing to acknowledge this leaves Brueggemann unbalanced in his critique.

So, some very good wisdom here, even though this is neither a fulsome description of what the Sabbath is (worship is barely mentioned), nor a wholistic diagnosis of the sins against the Sabbath we see in Scripture or in today's church [*It ought to be noted that the author did not intend this work to be a complete theology or praxis of Sabbath]. Neither is this a balanced prescription of how obedience to Sabbath keeping ought to look. Because the author focusses on disobedience to Sabbath rest on a communal, institutional and cultural scale (which admittedly is worthy of examination), he leans toward macro, socio-economic and regulated solutions. But greed and covetousness are fundamental to the fallen human condition and such sins, like all sin, will only be fought through the gospel of Jesus Christ and the triumph over and freedom from sin accomplished there. Brueggemann doesn't very clearly point us to the cross for individual redemption and without that there can be no true community renewal or institutional reformation. Any solution to Sabbath disobedience must begin with covenant faithfulness flowing from a grateful community of the redeemed. Turning from the gods of the age necessarily involves turning to Christ. Perhaps (hopefully) this is assumed by the author, but in a book like this (albeit brief), it needs to be clearly spelled out as the foundation which provides the basis to all else he says. While gleaning from and being informed by Jewish Sabbath practice is certainly not inconsistent with theology intended for the church, it is not clear (to this reader at least) how Brueggemann's view of Sabbath is transformed by the Christ event (or if it isn't, why not). Separated from the ultimate Sabbath rest that the Messiah brings and toward which the weekly Sabbath points, keeping Sabbath is just a work of human effort which will itself morph into an idol just as destructive as mammon. Keeping all this in mind, the church would benefit from, as part of a holistic understanding of the fourth commandment, viewing Sabbath as resistance to the false gods and the self-reliant and materialistic mindset of our age. Recommended with caveats.

Dumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling
Dumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling
by John Gatto
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 10.80
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4.0 out of 5 stars Dumb and dumber in the public schools, May 27 2014
This was a very insightful and strongly worded polemic outlining the many faults and evils of the compulsory, monopoly government school system, written by someone who spent most of his career in that system. While packed with good insight, this book is much stronger on diagnosing the ills than on prescribing the cure. Still, I highly recommend to anyone interested in the state of North American public education today, and especially to parents who don't want their children learning to passively and unquestioningly do whatever it is that the almighty state tells them to do but instead who want their kids to grow up thinking for themselves with healthy curiosity and imagination.

Conviction to Lead, The: 25 Principles for Leadership That Matters
Conviction to Lead, The: 25 Principles for Leadership That Matters
by Albert Mohler
Edition: Hardcover
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5.0 out of 5 stars The place to start for leadership wisdom, May 20 2014
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This book is very, very good. Most books on leadership are all about methods and management, and while the author admits those things are important and he speaks to them in this volume, Al Mohler very correctly explains that solid and effective leadership begins and ends with the leaders convictions. For leadership to truly seek and result in the success of the cause or organization being lead, that leadership must be based upon, nurtured through, and be measured against the truth-based convictions of the leader(s). If leading your organization or movement doesn't start with, persevere in and point toward firmly held convictions which are themselves based solidly in reality and in transcendental or "timeless" truths, no amount of pragmatic methods or strategic management will matter. While this book would benefit any leader at any level, it is particularly beneficial to those at the very top of their organizations and also those in some form of Christian ministry or endeavor as Mohler's biblical Christian worldview is the basis for his own firmly held convictions and comes out in all he writes. The reader benefits from Mohler's own experience as a successful leader in a few different contexts as well as from the wisdom he has gleaned from his own prodigious and varied reading. This book is (thankfully) devoid of corporate-speak, pop-culture and self-improvement jargon and is written clearly and argued plainly, making it accessible for anyone, including those for whom this is their first entry into leadership literature. This book will remain as relevant and timeless as the truths it is based upon. Very highly recommended.

A Neglected Grace: Family Worship in the Christian Home
A Neglected Grace: Family Worship in the Christian Home
by Jason Helopoulos
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 14.19
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Your family and church will be happier and richer for this book, May 13 2014
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This is a really solid case for and practical introduction to the largely lost practice of family worship. I appreciated the author's focus on family worship as a gracious gift God has given to Christian families and the church, a "means of grace", rather than another duty to heap upon already busy families which weighs them down. Helopoulos makes a biblical case for family worship, then speaks of the practical benefits and rich spiritual blessings it brings to family life. He goes on to describe what family worship in the home can look like - mainly Scripture reading with some simple exposition and questions to promote understanding, prayer and singing Psalms, theologically-rich hymns, and God-honouring praise songs (along with some additional and optional elements that some families may want to incorporate). Also valuable is the author's discussion on the tone such times ought to take, calling families to joyful, reverent, regular and consistent worship. The section on what family worship is not is very important and every family seeking to make family worship a practice in their home would do well to keep these cautions in mind and be careful never to let this gracious gift of God degenerate into disciplinarian brow-beating, pet-doctrine soap-boxing, mere moralism, or an idol in and of itself, where family becomes the focus. Family worship, like private and corporate worship, must be Godward-focused and must never become a tool for parental guilt-tripping or emotional and behavioural manipulation, nor should it ever just become a casual family time which has some loose Christian association or vague biblical orientation.

The author includes some good testimonies and stories from families who have made family worship a regular practice. I also appreciated the very pastoral approach to encouraging families who are trying to begin this practice in their home. Helopoulos advises starting slow, small and keeping it simple and short. And when the inevitable days come where it gets missed, rather than feeling like a failure, he encourages families to just pick it right back up instead of beating themselves up. It is first and foremost grace after all, which means it is primarily a gift God gives to families, not a duty he demands of them. Yes, family worship is both commanded and exampled in Scripture, but so is Baptism, Communion, corporate worship, and loving your spouse and children, and the commands for these other things are only properly obeyed when they themselves are seen as gracious gifts from the hands of a loving Father, and when we do them out of love and joy, delighting in them, not chafing under them.

I highly recommend this book to all families and to pastors looking to recover this once common Christian practice.

A History of the World in 6 Glasses
A History of the World in 6 Glasses
by Tom Standage
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 17.04
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting...ish, but pretty wooden, and the premise is cool, but a stretch, March 7 2014
This book was ok. You can get the gist of the book by reading the last paragraph of each chapter. There was some interesting history here but the premise - that these six drinks were somehow instrumental in directing the flow of historical progress - is a bit tenuous. These drinks were certainly linked to historical shifts and changes, but the author makes them out to sound considerably more of a key factor then they likely were. The first half of the book is about three alcoholic drinks (beer, wine and spirits) and the second half about three caffeinated drinks (coffee, tea and Coke). I would say the second half (or 2/3) was more engaging. Overall, clear, straight forward, but uninspired writing. Good reading if you are sitting in an airport. 2 3/4 stars.

Death by Living: Life Is Meant to Be Spent
Death by Living: Life Is Meant to Be Spent
by N D Wilson
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 19.99
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5.0 out of 5 stars Life is meant to be spent..., Jan. 27 2014
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In this follow up book to his Notes from the Tilt-a-Whirl, N.D. Wilson reminds us that we are all characters in a grand story and most of us are not nearly as important in the grand scheme as we often like to think we are (you don't have to read Tilt-a-Whirl first as each book stands alone). But while we don't get to pick the role we play, we do get to choose how we will play that role. Will you be a hero or a villain, a noble or a petty character? Will you act as if everything is about you or will you open your eyes to see your bit part but choose to play it to the full? Will you be thankful for the part you play or will you go through life bitter and wishing yourself into the lead role of your own little imaginary universe? When you exit the stage, will others say that you played your role whole-heartedly, half-heartedly or hard-heartedly?

Like Tilt-a-Whirl, this book is part personal memoir, part family history, part philosophical reflection, part stream-of-consciousness (sort of) theological meditation, but it is 100% gratitude to God for life, for his gracious working in and through the lives and circumstances that touch each one of us, and a challenge to strip away the lenses we all strap on over our eyes which too often make life mundane and render our hearts ungrateful. I found myself laughing out loud at places where Wilson is recollecting a family trip to Europe with several small children on one hand, and nearly at the point of tears when he recalls a white-knuckled drive through a mountain blizzard through which his wife and children slept peacefully as he slid all over the road between snow banks and guard rails, firing prayers heavenward which alternated between profound gratitude for his family and intense pleas for their safe journey through the storm (I identified with both scenarios).

I found this book a little more jump-aroundy than Tilt-a-Whirl, something which will make it a tad difficult for some readers to follow in places as the author jumps back and forth between thoughts and themes. Also, there is more of Wilson's own experience here than the last book and a little less clarity in places about what point he is making. But if you enjoy well turned phrases springing from a heart of thanks, and if poetic meditations which turn the everyday into the eternally significant float your boat, you won't be disappointed. If you don't enjoy those things, your reading habits need to get out more. Either way, you will benefit from this book.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen
by Peter J. Leithart
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 14.50
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Jane Austen 101, Jan. 27 2014
This review is from: Jane Austen (Paperback)
This is a brief, solid, interesting introduction to the life and personality of Jane Austen. It is meant as an "encounter" as the series title suggests, so don't look here for a thorough, minutely detailed biography. This book sets out to introduce the reader to "Jenny" Austen, and that it does quite capably. The reader will come away knowing a good deal about Austen's personality, her family, friends, life experiences, historical and cultural context, her writing career (which began at a very young age), her faith and her very good sense of humour, as well as how she was received and thought of by her contemporaries. For those wanting more detailed info, the footnotes point the reader to a gold mine of other sources. Recommended.

Between Heaven And Hell: A Dialog Somewhere Beyond Death, JFK, C.S. Lewis  and  Aldous Huxley
Between Heaven And Hell: A Dialog Somewhere Beyond Death, JFK, C.S. Lewis and Aldous Huxley
by Peter Kreeft
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 19.72
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4.0 out of 5 stars Christian theism vs. Christian humanism and pseudoChristian pantheism, Jan. 1 2014
3.5 stars. I have wanted to read this book for years as I think the premise is good and I am a big Lewis fan. This is a three way conversation in an intermediate place - somewhere between this life and the next - between three very important and influential men shortly after their death within hours of each other (C.S. Lewis, J.F.K. and Aldous Huxley). Fictional conversation is not a favourite genre of mine but it is fairly well done here, particularly in its grasp of the topic of debate and the logic of each position (Christian theism, Christian humanism, and Christian pantheism respectively) and in keeping the pace of conversation going. The "voices" of each of the characters don't sound quite as individual and differentiated as one would expect. It is hard to imagine Lewis quoting his own books in a debate much less quoting himself multiple times. Its not so hard to imagine Aldous Huxley doing so. And the conversation doesn't feel truly like a real conversation, as it is without much reference to the lives the three men very recently vacated. One imagines much more illustration from Lewis, and the "real world" pragmatism of Kennedy backed up by examples from his very recent political career. This conversation feels much more like a formal debate in which all three participants have cordially agreed to self moderate and play fair. Also, it feels more like two separate conversations (Lewis and Kennedy first, then Lewis and Huxley) rather than a true conversation in which all three participate simultaneously. Of course that is to be expected in a Socratic dialogue but I just felt it needed a bit more "real life" feel to make it great. Lewis emerges as the far superior intellect, which I think is quite accurate but which I think would have come across not quite as blatantly with two men he didn't know personally. Neither Lewis nor Huxley have many quotable lines in this conversation, which was not the case for these two accomplished wordsmiths in real life and which makes this not feel like its really them speaking. All this is to say that the author's voice tends to have a levelling effect and make the three conversationalist's voices sound too similar and rather flat. So, while the message is quite a fair representation of the positions of the debaters, the medium doesn't quite ring of accuracy. Still, a reasonably good read that is worthwhile.

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