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Derik Martel (Quebec City, QC, Canada)
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The Automatic Millionaire: Canadian Edition: A Powerful One-Step Plan to Live and Finish Rich
The Automatic Millionaire: Canadian Edition: A Powerful One-Step Plan to Live and Finish Rich
by David Bach
Edition: Paperback
17 used & new from CDN$ 5.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Great while missing a few things, May 25 2010
I noticed that a lot of people criticized this book in their reviews because of the lack of formulas, tables and significant examples sometimes, and I too felt that David Bach could have added some, but this book is still a great one.
I think the basic idea behind the book is not to overwhelm the readers with numbers, graphs and tables like some other books but to show you how you can build wealth and succeed in life following a few basic steps and a proven general approach towards money.
If you want to be picky with number crunching grab a calculator and do the maths yourself. This book was just meant to show you how to become an automatic millionaire, not a CFA!

Briefly, I'd say that it's great book for beginners in the subject but also a good motivational reading for people with already a certain knowledge in personal finance. It might lack a bit of details and numbers for some, but I still think it worth reading for about anybody.

Intelligent Investor: The Classic Text on Value Investing
Intelligent Investor: The Classic Text on Value Investing
by Benjamin Graham
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 27.27
35 used & new from CDN$ 20.66

2 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good read, but still ..., April 25 2010
Some people consider this book to be some sort of "Bible for investing" but after reading it I certainly don't.
First, this book is really long, and I mean REALLY long to read, and especially considering what knowledge you acquire from spending so many hours reading it. You can find all of what is said in these hundreds of pages in about any book on personal finance that has been written in recent years, and that is about 150 pages long.
Second, I had a hard time sometimes reading and following what was said since the style of writing is kind of hard to read and because there is so much emphasis on technical stuff and financial data that, in my view, doesn't bring that much to the book.
I think this book is worth reading since it's a classic, or if you're interested in what was going on in this field in the 40s, but other than that, I would not recommend it.
Don't count on this book to teach you how to organize your financial life or helping you achieve financial goals or anything, if you thought about reading for this book for some reason like that, forget it, read something else.

Fair Trade For All: How Trade Can Promote Development
Fair Trade For All: How Trade Can Promote Development
by Joseph E. Stiglitz
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 14.40
25 used & new from CDN$ 0.39

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointing but some of it is still interesting, April 25 2010
About 40 pages of the entire book are interesting i.e. the section about how and why Asia had great success developing its economy and how and why Latin America failed. The rest of the 200+ pages are all about ethics and stuff like that, not what you want to read about in an economics book.

The 250 Personal Finance Questions You Should Ask in Your 20s and 30s
The 250 Personal Finance Questions You Should Ask in Your 20s and 30s
by Debby Fowles
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 9.89
28 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

2.0 out of 5 stars Really disappointing, April 13 2010
I must say that I was really disappointed after reading this book. I expected a book that would tell me more about organizing my financial life and taking the right decisions in my 20s to ensure myself a good financial future but this book was everything but that.
Most of the 250 questions are totally pointless and useless, like that whole part about filing for bankruptcy. I thought this book would help me achieve financial success, why talk about bankruptcy then??!!
And the few questions that are meaningful are really not sufficiently developed. I mean how can you explain why to choose stocks over bonds and talk about mutual funds, all in 7 or 8 lines?!
So finally I don't recommend this book at all, and I suggest that if you're interested in personal finances for people of a young age, or just looking for a beginner's book on the subject, that you read "Rich by 30" by Lesley Scorgie, or "The wealthy barber" by David Chilton. I read both and they really are good books that could be qualified as "must reads"

Rich by Thirty: A Young Adult's Guide to Financial Success
Rich by Thirty: A Young Adult's Guide to Financial Success
by Lesley Scorgie
Edition: Hardcover
17 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must-read book for people 16 to 25, Feb. 25 2010
I'm a 21 year old business student and already possessed some knowledge about money, finances, investing and stuff like that before reading Rich By Thirty but I must say that I'm glad I still read it.
I think this book really is a great introduction to investing for young people who don't know a lot about the subject, but was also for me a good reminder of what I already knew since it puts everything together in a way that's easy to understand and that really makes sense.
This book also turned out to be a great motivation for me, putting the emphasis on ALL the benefits of investing a part of your income at a young age, and not only focusing on money and financial data. (I had an appointment with my banker a couple days after finishing the book to look at some investment options for me)
The book also contains a lot of examples adapted for people of different ages, backgrounds and financial goals.
Overall, it's a really great book for anyone aged between 16 and 25, no matter how much you think you know about investing, and I can't believe this book hasn't made it's way in our high school classes already.

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