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Rosemary Thornton "Niece of Murder Victim, Addie Hoyt Fargo" (Norfolk, VA)
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House in the Mail
House in the Mail
by Rosemary Wells
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 20.40
15 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

2.0 out of 5 stars A cute story, but filled with misinformation, July 3 2004
This review is from: House in the Mail (Hardcover)
This book is not entirely accurate from a historical perspective. While I was THRILLED to see a child's book about Sears homes, I was so disappointed to see that the book missed a golden opportunity to teach parents and children a little more about these awesome old mail-order houses.
The book states that Dad "...wrote a check out to Sears, Roebuck and Company for $2500..." Further, it says that this was their "whole life savings."
This family is already in trouble, because Sears kit homes did not include masonry, plaster, labor costs, excavation expense or heating, plumbing and electrical equipment. Nor did the house include ALL appliances as is inferred in Homer's conversation with his sister.
Pa brought home a "big fat catalog" (presumably a Sears Modern Homes catalog), but in fact, these catalogs were about 125 pages long. Hardly big and nothing close to fat. Small point, I know, but stay with me.
The book also states that the house would be put together "with a barrel of nails." Actually, the average Sears home contained 750 pounds of nails in widely varying sizes. They were shipped in 50 and 100-pound kegs, not in a single barrel. (That'd be SOME barrel.)
After the house arrived, it took "three trips in Grandad's truck" to haul the house from the train depot to the building site. The average Sears home had 30,000 pieces. That's going to take a LOT more than three trips.
The floor plan, pictured in the book is the Sears Honor-Bilt home - "The Walton." But the house pictured on the cover (and inside the book) is "The Avalon." Pretty confusing.
Further the book states that the house had a second floor. Neither the Avalon or the Walton had a second floor.
Perhaps most disappointing are the drawings of the interior trim and the door hinge. Sears never used "bull's eye" trim in their homes (as is pictured in the book) and their door hinges were often quite distinctive because they were half-mortised, half-surface mount. Showing one of these distincitive hinges could have done so much to teach folks how to spot Sears homes!
The book states that 22 doors were hung on brass hinges. Neither the Avalon or the Walton had anything close to 22 doors. And Sears homes did not have brass hinges, but plated steel.
Homer took the "leftover scraps of wood" and built a new treehouse in the woods. Considering that this house came as a "put-together kit" (pre-cut), there would be very, very few scraps of wood "leftover." In 1919, Sears claimed that someone assembling one of their pre-cut homes could "hang their saw on nail all day..."
About "The House in the Mail," - let me say again - it's cute, interesting, appealing and dear. But there are some informational errors.
A story should have its facts straight, even if the facts are not the central part of the story. On the plus side, Ms. Wells' love of children shines through the pages of this book.
I love Sears homes and spent four years researching them in order to write my book, "The Houses That Sears Built." 95% of the Sears homes in this country remain undiscovered. "The House in the Mail" could have helped remedy that problem...

Don't Call That Man!: A Survival Guide to Letting Go
Don't Call That Man!: A Survival Guide to Letting Go
by Rhonda Findling
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 10.11
78 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Simple and short little book, but..., Aug. 16 2003
I really, really liked it. When I purchased it, I didn't expect much, as it appears to have been self-published. (Not that there's anything wrong with that - but I've read some self-published titles that are so amatuerish.)
However...
This book was well written, well edited and was a fast, easy read. I used it as a reference work and returned to it again and again whilst emerging from a nasty little affair with an ambivalent, pathetic, emotionally-immature man that *I* was clinging to.
It also makes a LOT of sense. So much of the book really hit home with me. It doesn't dive too deep into the psycho-babble - but hits the high points of why you're clinging to that LOSER!
I'm a professional, successful smart woman and I was also a LOSER-Magnet. Reading this book helped me break old cycles and old patterns and demand respect from these men. DAYS after reading this book (and letting the LOSER go), I met a really nice man that pursues ME and treats me very well. Who knows where this relationship will go (if anywhere), but I know that we don't get into nice relationships unless we let the old bad relationships go.
I highly recommend "Don't Call That Man." It's a great book for a LOT of reasons.

Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles
Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles
by Anthony Swofford
Edition: Hardcover
65 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Wow - is this what we're teaching our young men?, Aug. 16 2003
Great book. I could not put it down. Very compelling read for 101 reasons. I discussed this book with a friend who is a Marine officer and he got very disturbed in hearing about it. Some "he-man" code of honor, I suppose, beckons Marines to keep quiet about the dark side of this aspect of military life.
If 25% of "Jarhead's" comments are true, the Marines need to completely revamp their training programs. While the book was an interesting read, it was also pretty disturbing to think that our tax dollars are TRAINING men to be belligerent, intolerant, angry and reckless.

Somewhere in Time
Somewhere in Time
Price: CDN$ 8.12
42 used & new from CDN$ 3.71

5.0 out of 5 stars This music brought tears to my eyes, Aug. 16 2003
This review is from: Somewhere in Time (Audio CD)
I was in the Music Store, looking for a CD to soothe my soul. I'm a music NUT and I found this CD. I remembered the movie (having stumbled upon it, as well), and I immediately purchased this CD.
In the car, I put the CD on and tears came to my eyes. There can be no more beautiful music on this earth. I listened to it for the next several hours and felt so peaceful and so stirred.
This is an incredible CD. Wish I'd found it months ago, but that's okay. I *did* find it and will thoroughly enjoy it.

Josh Groban
Josh Groban
Price: CDN$ 10.00
78 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Wow., May 16 2003
This review is from: Josh Groban (Audio CD)
I am a fan of a wide variety of music. I own no TV and I love music, so I always have the CD player on.
That being said, I have probably listened to this CD from Josh Groban hundreds of times. It is fantastic. I keep hoping he'll release a new CD soon, because I'll snap it up the second it hits the market.
Only one of the songs on this CD is a popular hit on the top 40 list, which surprises me, because IT is not even his BEST song.
This is a CD full of great songs. Every one is a winner. I love it!

Home
Home
Price: CDN$ 5.00
34 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!!!, Dec 6 2002
This review is from: Home (Audio CD)
I've always been a fan of bluegrass and this album (you call it CD, I call it album) has a lovely bluegrass/folk influence.
It contains the two mega hits "Long Time Gone" and "Landslide" but I suspect many more of these songs will make it to the Top 40 before long.
I've listened to it over and over and am still thoroughly enjoying it. The music, the lyrics, the intrumentation, the sound quality, the singing, etc., it's all top notch.
If you enjoy bluegrass and folk music, you're gonna LOVE this album. The dobro, mandolin, etc., very much in evidence throughout the album. LOVE IT!

Home
Home
Price: CDN$ 5.00
34 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!!!, Dec 6 2002
This review is from: Home (Audio CD)
I've always been a fan of bluegrass and this album (you call it CD, I call it album) has a lovely bluegrass/folk influence.
It contains the two mega hits "Long Time Gone" and "Landslide" but I suspect many more of these songs will make it to the Top 40 before long.
I've listened to it over and over and am still thoroughly enjoying it. The music, the lyrics, the intrumentation, the sound quality, the singing, etc., it's all top notch.
If you enjoy bluegrass and folk music, you're gonna LOVE this album. The dobro, mandolin, etc., very much in evidence throughout the album. LOVE IT!

Set This Circus Down
Set This Circus Down
Price: CDN$ 4.85
50 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars And I'm not even that big a Tim McGraw fan..., Oct. 1 2002
This review is from: Set This Circus Down (Audio CD)
But I sure do like this CD. "I Don't Know Why They Say Grown Men Don't Cry" is my #1 favorite song. Freshly divorced, sitting in my little apartment, I'd listen to this song over and over and over. Sometimes, I'd dance with my imaginary "friend" in the Living Room and feel calmed and comforted. Very soothing song and a lovely message. And performed so nicely.
However - "Angry All The Time" should have been performed by a woman. This song makes no sense sung by a man. Just no sense. That's the only reason I took a star away from this CD.

Unforgettable (Rm)
Unforgettable (Rm)
Offered by Aux 33 Tours
Price: CDN$ 9.99
6 used & new from CDN$ 6.74

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The sound quality is so disappointing, Sept. 20 2002
This review is from: Unforgettable (Rm) (Audio CD)
This is a great combination of Nat's songs and I love them all! However, like a previous reviewer wrote, the sound quality is so poor. Like listening to a 78 rpm. Tinny and scratchy. I have another Cole CD and the contrast in sound quality between the two is striking (and oh so disappointing).
I don't have that great an ear for subtle nuances but this is a BIG difference - between the well done CD and the scratchy "The Unforgettable Nat King Cole."
That aside, I discovered Nat King Cole's music while recovering from a hellish divorce.
Every melodic note that floated from Nat's beautiful voice felt like the angels themselves were comforting and healing my shattered heart. Sometimes, I closed my eyes and saw the notes as though they were sparkles of light and joy filling my quiet, small apartment. It's easy to do that with this man's songs.
Other times, late at night, when sleep eluded me, I danced slowly and gracefully with my imaginary lover in my arms, allowing Nat's gentle melodies to carry me away to a happier future.
If your heart and soul are broken in too many pieces to count, I recommend any of Nat's songs. They're a healing balm that reaches down into the core of your being...

House in the Mail
House in the Mail
by Rosemary Wells
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 20.40
15 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars A very sweet little story with adorable drawings, but..., May 4 2002
This review is from: House in the Mail (Hardcover)
This book is not entirely accurate from a historical perspective. While I was THRILLED to see a child's book about Sears homes, I was so disappointed to see that the book missed a golden opportunity to teach parents and children a little more about these awesome old mail-order houses.
The book states that Dad "...wrote a check out to Sears, Roebuck and Company for $2500..." Further, it says that this was their "whole life savings."
This family is already in trouble, because Sears kit homes did not include masonry, plaster, labor costs, excavation expense or heating, plumbing and electrical equipment. Nor did the house include ALL appliances as is inferred in Homer's conversation with his sister.
Pa brought home a "big fat catalog" (presumably a Sears Modern Homes catalog), but in fact, these catalogs were about 125 pages long. Hardly big and nothing close to fat. Small point, I know, but stay with me.
The book also states that the house would be put together "with a barrel of nails." Actually, the average Sears home contained 750 pounds of nails in widely varying sizes. They were shipped in 50 and 100-pound kegs, not in a single barrel. (That'd be SOME barrel.)
After the house arrived, it took "three trips in Grandad's truck" to haul the house from the train depot to the building site. The average Sears home had 30,000 pieces. That's going to take a LOT more than three trips.
The floor plan, pictured in the book is the Sears Honor-Bilt home - "The Walton." But the house pictured on the cover (and inside the book) is "The Avalon." Pretty confusing.
Further the book states that the house had a second floor. Neither the Avalon or the Walton had a second floor.
Perhaps most disappointing are the drawings of the interior trim and the door hinge. Sears never used "bull's eye" trim in their homes (as is pictured in the book) and their door hinges were often quite distinctive because they were half-mortised, half-surface mount. Showing one of these distincitive hinges could have done so much to teach folks how to spot Sears homes!
The book states that 22 doors were hung on brass hinges. Neither the Avalon or the Walton had anything close to 22 doors. And Sears homes did not have brass hinges, but plated steel.
Homer took the "leftover scraps of wood" and built a new treehouse in the woods. Considering that this house came as a "put-together kit" (pre-cut), there would be very, very few scraps of wood "leftover." In 1919, Sears claimed that someone assembling one of their pre-cut homes could "hang their saw on nail all day..."
About "The House in the Mail," - let me say again - it's cute, interesting, appealing and dear. But there are some informational errors.
A story should have its facts straight, even if the facts are not the central part of the story. On the plus side, Ms. Wells' love of children shines through the pages of this book.
I love Sears homes and spent two years researching them in order to write my book, "The Houses That Sears Built." 95% of the Sears homes in this country remain undiscovered. "The House in the Mail" could have helped remedy that problem...

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