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Alan Dean Foster (prescott, az)
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Meg: A Novel of Deep Terror
Meg: A Novel of Deep Terror
by Steve Alten
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
20 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

1.0 out of 5 stars From the deep rises...hysterical laughter, Nov. 20 2007
I've been diving with white sharks (South Australia) and seen them soaring (South Africa) and this book is an insult to sharks everywhere. Not to mention dedicated authors. I do keep a copy around, though. When I'm teaching a writing class or seminar and need an example of bad scribing, I can just flip to any page in MEG for a couple of juicy examples. Richard Ellis's review is too kind.

The only thing more depressing than trying to plow through this benthic gobbler is reading the positive reviews on Amazon, many of which are by themselves sufficient to make one weep for the future of literacy in this country.

Traditional & Contemporary Music From South Seas
Traditional & Contemporary Music From South Seas
Offered by Vanderbilt CA
Price: CDN$ 44.95
3 used & new from CDN$ 39.95

4.0 out of 5 stars Best of its kind, June 23 2004
I'm always leery of groups that claim to blend traditional music and instruments with "contemporary" influences. You tend to end up with amateurishly bad compositions, or riffs on traditional folk tunes with drums and electric guitar added. But Te Vaka is the real thing. Ranging from heart-warming to exhilharating, with some irresistible drum work that virtually demands you get up and dance, all of Te Vaka's work reaches back to the roots of Polynesian music while combining it with modern sensibilities. I highly recommend all three of their CD's as well as their exciting and informative video (live performance recorded in Samoa). A fourth CD is now out.
Maybe you can't afford a trip to the South Seas, but you can afford these CD's.

Brainwashed: How Universities Indoctrinate Americas Youth
Brainwashed: How Universities Indoctrinate Americas Youth
by Ben Shapiro
Edition: Hardcover
24 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Your UCLA, or mine...., June 10 2004
I spent five years at UCLA, during the "radical" '60's (1964-1969) and came away with two degrees: Political Science (*gasp*) and cinema (double *gasp*). As I recall my time there:
The English and American Lit professors taught English and American Lit.
The History professors taught history.
The film history and criticism professors taught film history and criticism.
Etc.
No one tried to brainwash me. Tests were based on reasonable and factual interpretation of the material. The Daily Bruin (for which I also did some writing) was generally alert and occasionally hysterical. My favorite comment came in the History of WWII, taught by the marvelous Prof. DeWeerd, who had been in China at the end of that conflict and told us that "The only person the Chinese people hate worse than Mao Tse-tung is Chiang Kai-shek"...not exactly a liberal observation.
I listened to everything I could, drew it all in, and then made my own decisions (which included becoming a writer). Them that can be brainwashed, will be, whether by university instructors, Rush Limbaugh, or TV. Them that cannot will keep civilization going.

Victory at Sea
Victory at Sea
Price: CDN$ 9.49
21 used & new from CDN$ 8.47

3.0 out of 5 stars Yes, but...., Feb. 20 2004
This review is from: Victory at Sea (Audio CD)
In addition to this release, purists might want to hunt for RCA Red Seal CD #6660-2. This earlier CD of Victory at Sea boasts a different printed insert, 14 tracks instead of the 13 on #60963 (some different) and in different order. They are: 1)Song of the High Seas 2)The Pacific Boils Over 3)Fire on the Waters 4)Guadacanal March 5)Peleliu 6)Theme of the Fast Carriers 7)Hard Work and Horseplay 8)Mare Nostrum 9)Beneath the Southern Cross 10)Mediterranean March 11)Allies on the March 12D-Day...and finishing more appropriately with 13)The Sound of Victory 14)Victory at Sea.
This CD says "Recorded in December 1957 and February 1959 in Manhattan Center", "Reissue editon" and "Digitally remastered"...but goes on to state "The analog recording for this compact disc was made before noise-reduction methods such as Dolby were available. In the digital remastering, some effort to minimize the inherent tape hiss was made; RADICAL METHODS HAVE NOT BEEN USED IN ORDER TO PRESERVE THE FULL-FREQUENCY CONTENT OF THE ORIGINAL RECORDINGS (caps. mine).
Good luck, all, finding a copy.

Smithsonian Atlas Of Amazon
Smithsonian Atlas Of Amazon
by M Goulding
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 28.84
27 used & new from CDN$ 14.62

3.0 out of 5 stars Good effort, but far from comprehensive, Dec 2 2003
While thorough in some areas, such as its discussion of sedimentation and flow volume river by river, this atlas of the Amazon is sorely lacking in others. Some examples: while major tributaries are named, many large ones that are minor only by Amazonian standards are never named. Despite the fact that many maps cover significant mountainous areas, including the Andes, none of the maps are colored to show altitude, which would greatly help the reader in visualizing the direction and rate of riverine flow.
Too few cities are shown on the maps, and then only on some. Cities that are mentioned as being in a map area are sometimes not shown on the relevant map at all. Other items significant to an atlas are completely omitted. Areas used for cattle ranching, rice growing, etc., are mentioned, but there are no maps that delineate them. Such areas are only shown as "deforested". Important roads, such as Pucallpa-Lima, are not labeled. Important proposed roads are referred to, but their routes are not shown. With the exception of Macchu Picchu, important archeological sites are mentioned but not shown. Contentious oil discoveries are discussed, but their locations are not shown on any maps, nor are the relevant pipelines. On page 213, protected-reserved areas are shown via three separate maps, but the areas are not combined, which would give a clearer picture of how much of the region being discussed (Rio Negro) is actually under some form of protection.
Writing tends to the repetitious. Despite the biological diversity of the Amazon basin, virtually no photos of indigenous wildlife are included. Some photos look like low-rez digital shots that have been enlarged too much. A couple are notably blurry.
A useful reference book to be sure, but far from definitive.

Symphony No. 4
Symphony No. 4
Price: CDN$ 15.94
17 used & new from CDN$ 12.73

5.0 out of 5 stars As exuberant as anything you haven't heard, Sept. 25 2003
This review is from: Symphony No. 4 (Audio CD)
If you don't like Braga-Santos's 3rd and 4th symphonies, all I can say is that you must be immune to the joy that classical music can bestow. Full of brilliantine orchestration and sheer musical craftsmanship, the 4th deserves not just to be played, but to be a standard. The fourth movement contains, in additional to the chorale-like coda discussed by other reviewers, not one but two memorable and stirring melodies. Perhaps labeling Braga-Santos the Portugese Tchakovski might help. Anything to get his symphonies 2 thru 4 played.
Crystalline performance by the orchestra that, for all its success, only hints at what a major ensemble could do with this piece.

Balto
Balto
DVD ~ Kevin Bacon
Price: CDN$ 11.93
23 used & new from CDN$ 9.95

4.0 out of 5 stars Fine, uplifting kid fare, Nov. 30 2002
This review is from: Balto (DVD)
Excellent animated film based on a true story. Particularly fine James Horner score. Only mis-step is the unnecessary live-action tag that jerks the viewer (particularly children) out of the fantasy Alaskan world that the animation so painstakingly creates. The tag could have been done just as well (and worked better) as a piece of animation.

Masters of Art: Bernini
Masters of Art: Bernini
by Charles Scribner
Edition: Hardcover
17 used & new from CDN$ 10.77

3.0 out of 5 stars Tough call between the Scribner and the Wittkower, Nov. 19 2002
I have the two main American books on Bernini; the Scribner and the Wittkower, plus the Scala edition by Maurizio Fagiolo from their "Great Masters of Art" series. Each book has something to commend it. Scribner's prose is by far the most passionate, easiest to read, and most informative for the general reader. The Wittkower is a bit dry and academic while the English translation of the Fagiolo is poorly done and shorter on material than either of the other two (understandable, since it's a shorter book).
On the other hand, the Wittkower contains far more photographic material than the other two. While many are in b&w, they still form the best record of Bernini's work to be had in book form. I don't know what Scribner's editors were thinking when they planned their edition (save money?). Inexplicably, it contains hardly any photographic close-ups or details of Bernini's work. For example, the Scribner's contains one full-length color plate of Pluto and Proserpine. The Wittkower has a full-length b&w plus seven different close-ups. The Scribner has one full-length color plate of the Ludovica Albertoni. The Wittkower has a full-length color plate, a close-up color plate, and five b&w close-ups. And how is anyone supposed to properly appreciately Bernini's multi-story Baldacchino in St. Peter's without close-ups?
Having seen a majority of Bernini's originals in person, I believe it is impossible to properly study or appreciate Bernini without the availability of the close-ups that really magnify his skill and genius, I would recommend buying the Wittkower over the Scribner. The Fagiolo has a good mix of photographs and is cheapest of all, but may only be available in Italy.

Masters of Art: Bernini
Masters of Art: Bernini
by Charles Scribner
Edition: Hardcover
17 used & new from CDN$ 10.77

3.0 out of 5 stars Tough call between the Scribner and the Wittkower, Nov. 19 2002
I have the two main American books on Bernini; the Scribner and the Wittkower, plus the Scala edition by Maurizio Fagiolo from their "Great Masters of Art" series. Each book has something to commend it. Scribner's prose is by far the most passionate, easiest to read, and most informative for the general reader. The Wittkower is a bit dry and academic while the English translation of the Fagiolo is poorly done and shorter on material than either of the other two (understandable, since it's a shorter book).
On the other hand, the Wittkower contains far more photographic material than the other two. While many are in b&w, they still form the best record of Bernini's work to be had in book form. I don't know what Scribner's editors were thinking when they planned their edition (save money?). Inexplicably, it contains hardly any photographic close-ups or details of Bernini's work. For example, the Scribner's contains one full-length color plate of Pluto and Proserpine. The Wittkower has a full-length b&w plus seven different close-ups. The Scribner has one full-length color plate of the Ludovica Albertoni. The Wittkower has a full-length color plate, a close-up color plate, and five b&w close-ups. And how is anyone supposed to properly appreciately Bernini's multi-story Baldacchino in St. Peter's without close-ups?
Since it is impossible to properly study or appreciate Bernini without the availability of the close-ups that really magnify his skill and genius, I would recommend buying the Wittkower over the Scribner. The Fagiolo has a good mix of photographs and is cheapest of all, but may only be available in Italy.

Realm of the Incas
Realm of the Incas
by Max Milligan
Edition: Hardcover
12 used & new from CDN$ 18.32

4.0 out of 5 stars Been There, Seen That, Book captures all, June 28 2002
This review is from: Realm of the Incas (Hardcover)
Wonderful succession of photographs of Inca country accompanied by very personal observations by the photographer, whose love for the region shines through in his text as well as his pictures. Though not a photographer myself, I particular enjoyed some of his comments on how and where certain shots were taken. I can vouch for the accuracy of the depictions, which provide a fine overview of one of the more fascinating parts of the planet.

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