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Eugene A Jewett "Eugene A Jewett" (Alexandria, Va. United States)

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Myths Of Rich And Poor: Why We're Better Off Than We Think
Myths Of Rich And Poor: Why We're Better Off Than We Think
by Michael W. Cox
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 13.14
33 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars this book holds up over time, July 15 2004
Michael Cox, of the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank and Richard Alm, a journalist by way of the university of Kansas, wrote this book five years ago prior to the 2000 presidential election. It addressed the same issues that we're dealing with today in 2004: how well off is the electorate and the definition of "real income"; the issues of downsizing or job exportation, an offshoot of the economic condition called creative destruction; the trade deficit as a sign of national economic strength or weakness; and how income mobility between the earning quintiles is alive and well in America i.e those who start poor don't remain poor, they can move up quickly. In fact, no one "oppresses them", the caveat of Marxist class warfare ideology. Isn't it amazing that students are still being taught the efficacy of Marxism in our universities by professors who act as hand-maidens for the Denmocratic Party (which has fallen off the proverbial cliff to the Left)?
You might suppose that the leaders of the Democratic Party, the one's who talk about the "two America's" and the wealth division that separates them might avail themselves of the realities extant in the country today, but no, they'll probably go down to defeat by a far larger margin than the current polling indicates due to their hard headed need to fight yesterdays wars. In fact, the workers of the world never did unite so the political Left has had to export a whole new working class of illegal immigrants to serve their mythology and win elections. Keeping that in mind, this book addresses the continuing progress of these very immigrants.
For starters (in 1997) the richest 1% of earners earned 17% of the income, but paid 35% of the taxes. Today they pay closer to 40%. By contrast, the bottom 50% of earners earned 14% of the income, but paid only 4% of the income taxes. To flesh this out, the top 25% of wage earners paid 82% of income taxes while earning far less of a percentage of the income. You'll also learn here that the percentage of Americans owning any household appliance you can name has increased markedly in the past 30 years. That passage of time has also yielded an additional benefit by requiring fewer hours of labor with regard to providing sufficient income for those purchases.
The book shows how America, with its rule of law protecting personal property rights, is the most successful economy in world history (and it's pulling away from the rest.) It highlights how we're immeasurabley better off than our forefathers - for easy reference, see Julian Simon and Stephen Moore's book "It's getting better all the time: 100 trends over the last 100 years." There you can see that longevity increases yearly which is a a pretty good ongoing indicator of the direction of our quality of life.
When Virginia Postrel of Reason magazine says that "no honest debate can ignore this book", she hits the nail on the head because the neo-communist left-wing in America doesn't want an honest debate. While facts don't win arguments a democracy via a constitutional republic, as imperfect as it is, is still the best political system available on the planet. Read "Myth's of the Rich and Poor" to find out why.
This is a terrific book for getting your head on straight when it comes to the realities by which all of us live. Buy a copy for your children and discuss it with them; they won't learn about it in school.

Shut Up and Sing: How Elites from Hollywood, Politics, and the UN Are Subverting America
Shut Up and Sing: How Elites from Hollywood, Politics, and the UN Are Subverting America
by Laura Ingraham
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 22.00
30 used & new from CDN$ 0.28

5.0 out of 5 stars She's a rarity, she sees the world clearly, July 15 2004
In this book, one better than I had expectations for, Laura Ingraham excoriates the Elites, a term she uses to describe those who are anti-Capitalist, anti-private property rights, anti-family formation, and commensurately anti-socialization of family values infused into the child by the family. She's also against minority rights vs majority rights, and firmly against transferring our legal system to the auspices of the UN and the World Court.
She explains how America, Western Europe, and the Middle-east ended up with so many of their Elites hating American values while concommitantly arrogating to themselves the mantle of a superior virtue, one more compassionate than the one adopted by their enemies; those who believe in the worth of the founding father's and the fairness and efficacy or the constitution of the USA.
After she catalogues the existence and operation of each of these "vertical markets" of venomous propoaganda, she expounds on how to turn the tide back to where people are once again taught the virtues of American exceptionalism, indeed are taught the foundations of our Constitution, our Bill of Rights, our Declaration of Independence, and the importance of our Ratification Debates and the Federalist Papers that informed them.
She begins by elucidating the motivations of those who abhor American exceptionalism: those in Hollywood and their newest hero, Michael Moore. She follows by recounting their tactics and goals which include the usual anti-capitalist themes: anti-war, anti-religion, anti-private property, and anti-family.
She explains their open border immigration policies by which, in true Marxist fashion, they hope to import a whole new working class whose values they can mold toward socialism. She highlights their elitist stranglehold on academia, and their severe wrenching to the Left of class content, their bizarre theories which have kindled a rewriting of history with a neo-communist bias, and their hugely biased reading texts.
She next outlines the perfidy, calumny and corruption of the UN with a call for its reform. Then she avers why these neo-communist elites are losing ground; and I might add, not a moment to soon.
Laura Ingraham has the capacity granted to a small minority of people, the ability to see the world as it is and not as how they would like it to be. Ronald Reagan had this ability as did Margaret Thatcher and Winston Churchill. In addition she and they are (and were) honest, uncorruptable individuals. With Laura, you can sense her frustration as she sometimes lashes out at those on the point of her criticism, but this is a characteristic that has been honed beyond the limits by the Martin Sheen, Danny Glover, Harry Belafonte, and the rest of the neo-communist crowd. Why? You need not wonder any longer. Laura tells you and she does an excellent job of it.
Those who pick at her conclusions are whistling past the graveyard. The whole debate is about to change, stay tuned!

Vietnam: The Necessary War: A Reinterpretation of America's Most Disastrous Military Conflict
Vietnam: The Necessary War: A Reinterpretation of America's Most Disastrous Military Conflict
by Michael Lind
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 26.60
26 used & new from CDN$ 1.76

5.0 out of 5 stars Thank God for the information revolution, June 6 2004
In this most balanced historical rendering of the reasons, causes and effects of the long war in Indochina, Lind provides extensively nuanced opinions and facts. Published in 1999, it has the factual gravitas that goes with being a beneficiary of the West's access to the post-communism Soviet archives, which became available after the fall of the wall and the implosion of its, as Ronald Reagan would accurately say, Marxist-evil empire. These considerable facts reveal the calumny, continuing even today, of the hard left-wing socialist utopians in America to distort the realities of the Indochina war of the 1940's-1970's to the American people in a successful attempt to miss portray the entire Cold War effort, particularly the battle for Vietnam. Lind makes clear how the Communist regime in the USSR (who provided comprehensive air defenses for Hanoi unseen since Nazi Germany's defense of Berlin in WWII), aided by the Communist's in Beijing, (who provided the crucial assistance of +/- 317,000 Maoist Communist soldiers to Ho Chi Minh's Communist thugs, who in turn used them copiously in logistical support efforts for the war), were the difference in stifling America's military intervention which focused on stopping the spread of Communism in the greater southeastern Asian land mass. That the American and European Left not only denied this now overwhelming reality, but successfully portrayed it as a civil war with Ho Chi Minh as merely a "leader of his people", calls them to task for perpetrating a barbarous falsehood for which they've yet to apologize.
Lind illustrates the importance of remembering that this was the first foreign war fought on television, which made it easier for the overwhelmingly Left-wing press in America to mischaracterize the war by engaging in a grossly fraudulent display of the fallacy of inductive logic, where a specific event is elevated to create the misperception that it represents the "whole"; think the Tet offensive in February 1968. Interestingly enough, this same upside-down one-sidedness of the western press is ongoing today in the reporting of the current war in Iraq.
Lind covers in detail the origins of the Cold War (really WW III) where the West, while involved in a siege in Western Europe with the Soviets, was compelled to fight proxy wars in other parts of the world, specifically in the Asian theatre. In fact, Lind breaks the Cold War into two wars separated by the Tet offensive in 1968 and the Russian invasion of Afghanistan in 1979. He remonstrates on Russian adventurisn in Africa, Central America, and Afghanistan in the face of America's lack of resolve to fight the Cold War in foreign lands after Tet.
He also points out that without the loss of China to Maoist Communism we would never have had to face the conflict in Korea or the subsequent one in Indochina. Of note, we still haven't had to lay down American lives to protect Taiwan, but the jury is still out on whether or not the Red Chinese will get crazy enough to start a conflict with us there.
Lind also points out the need to keep weaker more militarily dependent nations on our side by citing a "bandwagon effect" where, like female elephant seals in a harem flock to the newly dominant male who has vanquished the previous alpha-male of the flock. This was on international display in the 1970's. For those who are economically ignorant, there is not enough room here to explain why this is important. If you don't understand it then do your military history homework, something undemanded in academia today.
Lind comments at length on why those in America, both pro and anti-war, seem to be that way due to historical geographical positioning. It's a fascinating discourse and one that by itself makes this a great book. Not only does his commentary dwell on why some go to war while others are restrained, but it also calls into question why those who don't cannot change their minds, even in the face of an overwhelming necessity to pay closer attention. The whole discussion is a paradigm for why all great cultures throughout history have imploded from within due to a moral rot at the core. Sometimes it happens slowly, other times over a much long period, but it always seems to happen. It makes one ponder, what is it in the minds of men...? I'm sure Shakespeare understood this seemingly elusive concept as he seemed to capture about every other theme on human nature that one could imagine.
In the end, Lind makes his case for why Vietnam was a war of necessity for America. Again, this is a wonderfully nuanced book just chock full of interesting facts and insights, but it won't change the minds of those "true believer's" in socialism as the ideal system for operating societies in what we today call western civilization. Indeed, these Marxist-socialist utopians in the west hate capitalism so much that they continue to root against America's capitalist system both domestically and internationally. This is consistent with their opposition against any country abroad (think Israel) that seems to be a successful arm of it. What makes this book a timely read, is the one-sided reporting (the kind that consistently occurred during the Indochina war) of events occurring in Iraq. The marginalization of beheading an American citizen on worldwide television with the fraternity hell-week hazing of Iraqi killers held prisoner in the Abu Ghraib prison (the site of some of Saddam's many brutal torture cells) being just one example. By the same token, the Communist's in Vietnam regularly beheaded village chiefs and their South Vietnamese followers, and then put their heads on pikes in the conquered villages in a successful attempt to intimidate and cow the inhabitants.
For an understanding of why countries go to war in the first place, this is a great and timely book. You won't hear its salient points discussed any where in academia, Hollywood, the major print media, or on the major networks including PBS/NPR, or CNN. If you're a budding intellectual, this is a book for you.

Pro Basketball Scouting Report 1990-91
Pro Basketball Scouting Report 1990-91
by Rick Barry
Edition: Paperback
9 used & new from CDN$ 27.35

5.0 out of 5 stars Rick at his incisive best, April 26 2004
Rick Barry wrote eight books covering eight NBA seasons, basically for general managers and coaches. They provide scouting reports by one of the games 50 greatest players. Written in B-Ball jargon Barry provides readers with a keen insight into athletic talent and its application or mis-application whichever the case.
After perusing all eight books, I looked up the first five players drafted in every year back into the late seventies. Lo, I found that unless your team had one of the first three players taken in the entire draft your team did not win the NBA title. Furthermore I concluded that, after 13 years of holding season tickets for the Bullets, the teams that won most often have 8-9 good players vs those that lose who have only 3-4 good players. But, the pivotal player who carries the team must be present for ultimate success to be realized.
To draw a comparison, I learned years ago that there were one million high school football players. These reduced to 70,000 college players and then condensed further to 1200 NFL players. These remaining players averaged 3-4 years in the league, but the top 100-125 played for 10-15 years. The team who had the most of these head-and-shoulders better players won the championship. I believe this model holds true in all sports at all levels. It fits with a basis tenet of chaos theory and also with Mike Hart's book "the 100: A Ranking of the 100 most influential people in history." Thus I maintain that it's a model for how free markets and their unfettered, spontaneous ordering arrange civilizations. This leads into why western civilization has succeeded in raising living standards more for the common man in contrast to command and control economies.

Too bad Rick B. and Jordan Cohn stopped after the '97 season. It was great stuff for contemplative fans.

Rick Barry's Pro Basketball Bible 1994-1995: Player Ratings and In-Depth Analysis of More Than 400 NBA Players and Draft Picks
Rick Barry's Pro Basketball Bible 1994-1995: Player Ratings and In-Depth Analysis of More Than 400 NBA Players and Draft Picks
by Rick Barry
Edition: Paperback
11 used & new from CDN$ 3.40

5.0 out of 5 stars On free markets an winning teams, April 26 2004
Rick Barry wrote eight books covering eight NBA seasons, basically for general managers and coaches. They provide scouting reports by one of the games 50 greatest players. Written in B-Ball jargon Barry provides readers with a keen insight into athletic talent and its application or mis-application whichever the case.
After perusing all eight books, I looked up the first five players drafted in every year back into the late seventies. Lo, I found that unless your team had one of the first three players taken in the entire draft your team did not win the NBA title. Furthermore I concluded that, after 13 years of holding season tickets for the Bullets, the teams that won most often have 8-9 good players vs those that lose who have only 3-4 good players. But, the pivotal player who carries the team must be present for ultimate success to be realized.
To draw a comparison, I learned years ago that there were one million high school football players. These reduced to 70,000 college players and then condensed further to 1200 NFL players. These remaining players averaged 3-4 years in the league, but the top 100-125 played for 10-15 years. The team who had the most of these head-and-shoulders better players won the championship. I believe this model holds true in all sports at all levels. It fits with a basis tenet of chaos theory and also with Mike Hart's book "the 100: A Ranking of the 100 most influential people in history." Thus I maintain that it's a model for how free markets and their unfettered, spontaneous ordering arrange civilizations. This leads into why western civilization has succeeded in raising living standards more for the common man in contrast to command and control economies.
Too bad Rick B. and Jordan Cohn stopped after the '97 season. It was great stuff for contemplative fans.

Constant Battles: The Myth of the Peaceful, Noble Savage
Constant Battles: The Myth of the Peaceful, Noble Savage
by Steven Le Blanc
Edition: Hardcover
11 used & new from CDN$ 17.40

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very good book, April 15 2004
Steven LeBlanc of Harvard makes a great case against the popular mythology that pre-historical man somehow lived at peace with his environment while simultaneously using only what he needed to live and no more; that is, without overusing the resources of his surrounding environment. He cites his vast experience as an archeologist to show that man has always been at war with other men, and has always "trashed" the environment. The myth has heretofore been that man only became warlike with the rise of capitalism which is supposed to have made men exploitative toward other men while concommitantly making him a despoiler of the environment in pursuit of greater profits; profits being a dirty word. BTW, anyone reading "Genome" by Ridley would be disabused of these notion immediately. However.........
If you're an anti-politically-correctness guy like myself, you'll howl with laughter at these ridiculous theories of those in archeology who are slaves to funding at the government trough where these theories of history predominate; to purposely push a political agenda advocating international one-world socialism. This book should be required as a grouping of books to be studied along with "Genome", "no bone unturned" by Benedict, "the skeptical environmentalist" by Lomborg, "Bias" by Bernard Goldberg, and countless others which handily refute the distortions fomented on unsuspecting students by teachers with a far-left neo-communist agenda.
If you're interested in how man evolved from monkeys, and made it out of Africa, you'll also love this book. Read Jane Goodall's books on the chimps in Gombi, and anything by Franz DeWall. Utterly fascinating!

The Alchemy of Finance
The Alchemy of Finance
by George Soros
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 18.80
38 used & new from CDN$ 14.84

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good book for a comodities trader, April 15 2004
This review is from: The Alchemy of Finance (Paperback)
Soros wrote this book several years ago as a self proclaimed "life's work" about his techniques for trading in the currencies and commodities markets. He became famous for making a billion dollars in one day by shorting the British pound against the dollar and other currencies. More recently, Soros has become famous for his financial backing of neo-communist media-hit organizations, like moveon.com and international A.N.S.W.E.R., due to his pathological and self-acknowledged hatred of G.W. Bush. This seems at odds with the cooler countenance of a financial markets trader such that he is, and a successful one at that, but, it's a funny and inconsistent world, is it not?
Soros demonstrates throughout this somewhat turgid tome a masterful knowledge of the seemingly ceaseless elements of the fundamentals underlying the trading decisions of a fin-mkt operator. His theory of reflexivity, a play on Einsteins theory of relativity, is a commentary on the human capacity to change events by taking actions ahead of perceived expections only to distort the outcomes expected in the first place. Put simply, it's an understanding of how markets actually work in real life, not in the void of an academic lab setting.
When you're capable of making a billion in a day it's easy to gain a messianic complex and there's a bit of that on display in this book. Couple that with Soros' having escaped totalitarianism as a young Jewish boy in Hungary, and you can only marvel at his skill, talent and tenacity.
Being a creature of the fin-mkts myself I thoroughly enjoyed this book, however it would be tedious for almost anyone not consumed by the prospects of i.e. shorting palm oil in Asia while going long soybeans in the west, or someone bent on knowing the open interest represented in the oil tanks of Rotterdam; not something one hears discussed nightly on the news.
For a look into the mind of the money behind the Kerry campaign of 2004, read this book. But, read it dlowly and take copious notes. And, good luck on your foray into currency trading, you'll need it.

Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience, And What Makes Us Human
Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience, And What Makes Us Human
by Matt Ridley
Edition: Hardcover
43 used & new from CDN$ 0.26

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If ever a wiz, a wiz there was, if ever a wiz there was, March 16 2004
Matt Ridley has written a very good book on the origins of human behavior. It's worth reading two or three times just to keep all the information straight, unless you're one who just downloads what you read into your file cabinet of a mind. Well,... not I, this was difficult. In that other reveiwers here have gone into an adequate description of the book I'd like to assume a different tack. Why did Ridley follow up "Genome" with "Nature via Nurture?"
It seems that he's gone to great lengths to establish a postulate that genes are enabling forces that engage nature in some sort of a closed feed-back loop whereby they're switched on and off by yet other genes in response to the influences of outside events. This is fascinating and makes perfect sense. Yet we also learn of genes that govern our ability to pair-bond/ to form loving relationships, genes for agression vs timidity, genes for criminal behavior, genes for fear and courage, for intensity vs calmness, and a myriad of other behavioral traits, abilities and characteristics. Can these traits be changed by outside events?
We find that restraint is the lynchpin of culture, and it's that which separates us from the apes. We also learn that specialization and division of labor are unique to humans relative to animals who have to do everything for themselves. This all has a plausible ring to it does it not? Again and again we're told of all the different ways that genes/nature are coupled with nurture/environment until we become intellectually dizzy with all the permutations of information derived from history, science and societal differences. We learn of the countless ways genes can and do interact. It's a full bucket of information!
Then we get to the twin studies and the hereitability of traits and behavioral characteristics. This is fascinating. Identical twins have a far greater incidence of hereitible traits than fraternal twins. And, even if they've been separated at birth they show remarkable similarities in every way when they're reintroduced 35 years later, even when brought up in entirely different surroundings. Somehow the environmental side of the equation failed to switch those genes on and off in a way that would have radically changed their behavior in the interim. However, it's not politically correct to say this. After all, political correctness has always been the province of those on the Left who have made the claim that the perfect socialist man will result if inflenced with the proper environmental stimuli, from birth or otherwise. Ridley points out that this form of societal organization has resulted in gulags and mass murder, but that logic hasn't seemed to have affected the collective worldveiws of those who have what the author Thomas Sowell refers to as "the vision of the annointed." In any event, Ridley brings all of these competing theories into play while nudging his premise toward the middle of the political road. He does it well!
The book "Taboo", by a track and field guy whose name escapes me, goes into great length on the dominance that some racial groups have in certain sports and in certain track and field events. Thomas Sowell has written repeatedly about how different nationalities have become adept at different tasks or trades in different areas of the world. And, J.Philip Rushton has written extensively on this subject in his book, "race, evolution and behavior." Whether one agrees with these gentlemen or not their work deserves discussion. While Ridley eschews this radioactive info he does go into the work of Jane Goodall with the Chimps in Gombi. I believe that Ridley is acutely aware of this point of view, but that he's doesn't want to be pegged as a radical in favor of genetic determinism (and I don't believe that he is a radical). However, he knows that when one goes too far in favor of "nurture" as a deciding behavioral factor that one can be caricatured and more easily dismissed by the political enemies of ones position.
I'm hopeful that research will soon tell us what it is that makes it so common for humans to blind themselves from accepting new information into their old theories of how the world works; to tell us, how a man might change his belief system and subsequently his behavior patterns. When this feedback loop is established mankind will take a quantum leap forward. Ridley is a magnificent narrator in this endeavor and I look forward to his continuing tale with eager anticipation. The excitement is evident as new information flows into this on-going debate, and I agree with Ridley as he says, "it's the most profound intellectual moment in the history of mankind", truly a magic time to be alive!

The Vandal's Crown: How Rebel Currency Traders Overthrew the World's Central Banks
The Vandal's Crown: How Rebel Currency Traders Overthrew the World's Central Banks
by Gregory J. Millman
Edition: Hardcover
29 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars A book everyone needs to read, Feb. 10 2004
Talk about a book that everyone should read, but no one will, this is it. A terrific, plain language explanation of the origins of money and how understanding money leads to political sophistication and concommitant societal benefits.
This book makes many cogent arguments that deal with war and external defense, interior political and civil stabilty, the societal need for a stable currency, the need for a rule of law to protect private property rights, and the implications of the velocity and movements of global currency trading. It does a great job of explaning financial derivitives, options, inflation, debasement of the currency via political corruption, and financial globalization of trade and currencies.
It contains a marvelous retelling of history thru the eyes of a currency sophisticate, one who incorporates a history of revolutions, and the subsequent rebuildings of the societies that gain prominence in their aftermath.
The backdrop for this fascinating tale is the rise of the micro-chip, the story of the digital revolution. This running-wild tale illustrates how technology has outstripped the ability of dictators to throttle it, and how society has commensurately reaped the benefits. It's a paradigm for the future and deserves to be more widely understood. It has shaken up the strangle hold of one political philosophy ruling the media, and in the future it will reform tort law and academia. It's all here for those willing to study it.
Read it!

No Bone Unturned: The Adventures of a Top Smithsonian Forensic Scientist and the Legal Battle for America's Oldest Skeletons
No Bone Unturned: The Adventures of a Top Smithsonian Forensic Scientist and the Legal Battle for America's Oldest Skeletons
by Jeff Benedict
Edition: Hardcover
22 used & new from CDN$ 0.70

4.0 out of 5 stars In this story, Owsley makes his bones, Feb. 10 2004
This book is about Dr. Douglas Owsley, a curator for the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and America's foremost authority on skeletal remains. He has handled more than 10,000 human skeletons, and is by by far the most knowledgeable scientist in his field in America. This book deals first with his life and its origins, and secondly with his legal battles against the Clinton-Gore White House over custody of the remains of a 9200 year old skeleton found along the Columbia river in Washington state and now known as "kennewick Man."
It was reported just the other day, February 4th - 2004, that an appeals court decided that scientists could now study the bones of "Kennewick Man." A three-judge panel agreed with a lower court that these human remains were not impacted by the federal grave-protection laws because there is no evidence connecting them to any existing indian tribe. The reasons for this legal battle are clearly political. The instrument of force used by the Clinton-Gore administration, the Army Corps of Engineers, initially agreed with the objections of American indian tribes in the area who protested that the bones were sacred tribal relics and thus subject to burial on tribal lands. In that capacity the Corps took them into custody. This book is focused largely on the now successful quest of a determined group of scientists to gain access to the bones that they might be studied, allowing all of us to more accurately understand our history as a nation. One might ponder why a goup of indians would have a problem with this?
Jeff Benedict, an investigative journalist, does a wonderful job of uncovering this story, one which casts the Clinton administration in the craven and corrupt fashion by which it deserves to be remembered. It also depicts Owsley and seven other of America's leading scientists as brave and dogged men of principle, the kind who have historically championed the fights of a civil society against its dictatorial elites.
One merely has to trace the origins of these laws, in this case alleging that American Indians were the first inhabitants of America givng them special claims, to the Democratic Party's creation of yet another example of their multiple victim groups to whom they, once installed, grant huge welfare money in return for large campaign contributions; a perpetual money machine of campaign corruption, a closed feedback loop thru they wish to perpetuate their existance, and which they wish to keep intact at all costs. One can only marvel at the audacity of Al Gore and his minions as they direct the Corp of Engineers, in defiance of congress, to drop tons of rocks on the burial site of Kennewick Man that they might inhibit futher study.
This is indeed a terrific and well told story and men like Owsley and his crew deserve far more mention than they will ever get.

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