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Stefohnee "stef" (Redmond, WA United States)

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The Kitchen Detective: A Culinary Sleuth Solves Common Cooking Mysteries with 125 Foolproof Recipes.
The Kitchen Detective: A Culinary Sleuth Solves Common Cooking Mysteries with 125 Foolproof Recipes.
by Editors Of Cooks Illustrated
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 22.02
25 used & new from CDN$ 2.11

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On par with my dog-eared copy of 'Joy of Cooking', March 1 2004
I almost didn't buy this book after wondering if it would just end up being another issue of Cook's Illustrated (the magazine founded by Kimball), but decided to go ahead and get it, and I'm really glad I did! After only having owned this book for a week, it's already my favorite cookbook. I don't know if it's my New England sensibilities or just the high quality of the recipes that I've come to expect from Kimball & Co., but I'm amazed at how many of the recipes in this cookbook I want to make. Usually when I buy a cookbook, many of the recipes are either too time-consuming, too complicated, or they require expensive or hard-to-find ingredients. As he tests different recipes to come up with a perfected version, Kimball makes note of any strange ingredients or bizarre preparation methods, favoring simpler and more straightforward methods that will save cooks time and result in recipes just as delicious as any that require hours in the kitchen.
The book is divided into sections - soups, meats, dessert, and includes many helpful sidebars with interesting information about such things as the rise of Kraft Mac & Cheese or his most-used kitchen tools. Overall, this book is more than just recipes, though the recipes are all really great. The author goes through the trial and error process for you, reports on his results, and analyzes why some recipes failed and others succeeded, and gives you the knowledge you'll need to know what makes some recipes work and others turn out badly.
My only complaint about this book is Kimball's overuse of the phrase 'marriage' when referring to the combination of two ingredients, tastes, textures, etc. Someone get this man a list of synonyms.

Epson Stylus C60 Ink Jet Printer
Epson Stylus C60 Ink Jet Printer

4.0 out of 5 stars The little printer that could, June 25 2003
This is a pretty decent printer. I've had it for 2 years now and it hasn't given up yet, through term papers and lab reports and printing out all kinds of random things. It even did a great job for t-shirt transfers. It's pretty speedy compared to similarly-priced inkjet printers. Couldn't really ask for more, unless you want to spend the money on a laserjet.

No Title Available

5.0 out of 5 stars No problems in the last 3 years, June 25 2003
This phone is rugged. I swear, I've lost count of how many times I've dropped it on the floor and been pleasantly surprised that nothing broke or cracked. A few of my friends have newer, shinier phones with all kinds of special features like super breakoffable antennas that have snapped in half multiple times. I've never had a problem with my internal antenna - it depends on where you are. If I'm in the middle of the woods, reception isn't great. If I'm in the city, I can converse with someone on the other side of the country and convince them that I'm on a landline.
My only complaint is that the paint started chipping after about a year. But in the 3 years I've owned it, only a tiny spot has lost its paint, and I bought a leather cover for it, anyway, so no one can even tell.

Copco Strata Satin Finish Stainless Steel Whistling Teakettle
Copco Strata Satin Finish Stainless Steel Whistling Teakettle
Price: CDN$ 22.19

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Rusty!, June 25 2003
The only redeeming feature of this kettle is how fast it will boil water.
It's a bad sign when the owner's manual includes instructions on how to get rid of the rust spots that will develop on the inside of the teakettle if you don't dry it between each and every use. I drink a lot of tea and coffee, so that's really just not practical.
It's impossible to get water into this thing because the handle is rigid and does not move from side to side like most good teakettles.
The whistle is so noisy and piercing that it feels like my ears are going to bleed every time it goes off.
Oh, and did I mention the rust spot? I only got my money's worth because I got 4 free coffee mugs with this kettle when I bought it. There's nothing worse than having to throw out what seems from the outside to be a perfectly good thing.
Spend more on something that will last a lifetime.

No Title Available

4.0 out of 5 stars Heavier advertising is balanced out by great recipes, June 21 2003
It's no news that magazines today are typically more than 50% advertisements. But I think the tasty recipes and absolutely beautiful photos in Gourmet make up for it. Plus, some of the high-end ads are pretty dazzling, too - though I could never afford half the things they're trying to sell me.
I'd give it 4 stars instead of 5 because of the lengthy travel articles included in each issue. They *are* writing about the good eats they find along the way during their travel, but I wish they would just pick a location and feature recipes from that area rather than try to sell me on travelling somewhere exotic. I *wish* I could, but if I wanted advice on that, I'd buy a magazine about travelling, or eating while travelling, or one of the many magazines that I'm sure exist dedicated exclusively to eating great food while on the go in City X. However, like I said - I'm blinded by the great-looking food that, surprisingly, is made quite accessible to the everyday cook even though some people might be scared away by the term 'gourmet'.

No Title Available

4.0 out of 5 stars Heavier advertising is balanced out by great recipes, June 21 2003
It's no news that magazines today are typically more than 50% advertisements. But I think the tasty recipes and absolutely beautiful photos in Gourmet make up for it. Plus, some of the high-end ads are pretty dazzling, too - though I could never afford half the things they're trying to sell me.
I'd give it 4 stars instead of 5 because of the lengthy travel articles included in each issue. They *are* writing about the good eats they find along the way during their travel, but I wish they would just pick a location and feature recipes from that area rather than try to sell me on travelling somewhere exotic. I *wish* I could, but if I wanted advice on that, I'd buy a magazine about travelling, or eating while travelling, or one of the many magazines that I'm sure exist dedicated exclusively to eating great food while on the go in City X. However, like I said - I'm blinded by the great-looking food that, surprisingly, is made quite accessible to the everyday cook even though some people might be scared away by the term 'gourmet'.

No Title Available

4.0 out of 5 stars Down-to-earth cooking for those of us who aren't pro chefs, June 21 2003
The editors of Cooking Light know that we don't all have our own show on the Food Network. They know we don't want to spend an hour preparing dinner when we get home from work at night. The recipes are all relatively simple. There are some more complicated ones thrown in, which is good, because sometimes it's fun to make something that requires more skill (and time). My only problem with the magazine is that, lately, they have stopped focusing so much on *cooking* light and started to lean more toward exercise tips and vacation spots. Right now it's bordering on making me want to cancel my subscriptions, but I just like the magazine's recipes too much. If they put any more emphasis on the latest workout routine or exotic 'light eating' in Cancun, however, I might just drop them.

No Title Available

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent grinder!, June 17 2003
This is a great grinder. If you want to grind your own beans for coffee (it's the way to go!) a burr grinder is what you want, and this one is a good choice. You can choose to use the top attachment, which you fill with beans (they trickle down into the grinder, which automatically shuts off when it's done) or you can just put some set amount of beans on top of the grinder, put the lid on, and let it grind until it's done.
The big feature I like about this grinder is that it has lots of different settings. I use a French Press to make my coffee, and the cheap, 1-setting coffee grinder I bought was grinding my beans WAY too thin, resulting in lots of sludge and grit in the bottom of my coffee cup. With this grinder, I can choose a really coarse grind, so my press filters out all the coffee grounds and leaves me with an entire cup of coffee, all of which is liquid.
This thing might seem a bit pricey, but it's worth it, just so you don't have to buy a new $20 coffee grinder every year or so.
In their reviews, some people have said this grinder is messy. Well, it IS grinding coffee beans. You're going to have a lot of powder. The grinder comes with a little brush to clean out the hard-to-reach bits, but you should probably buy a bigger one. A small price to pay for a grinder that can do so much, I say.

Bodum Chambord Coffee Press
Bodum Chambord Coffee Press
Offered by Marvellous Group
Price: CDN$ 39.49
6 used & new from CDN$ 39.49

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best coffee I've ever had, June 17 2003
I previously owned a (much) smaller version of this press, which made an excellent cup of coffee. But that was the problem. It only made a CUP of coffee. I usually have two, and what if others want coffee? It takes a while, going one cup at a time.
Needless to say, I upgraded to this larger press, which makes about 3 times more coffee. It makes the best coffee ever - I could never go back to a junky old drip coffee maker after this. Yeah, it's more work than a drip coffee maker, but really, would you rather have quick, easy coffee that tastes bad, or a delicious cup of coffee that takes 5 minutes more?
Using this is like steeping tea - you boil some water, grind some coffee beans (I hope you're grinding your own coffee beans!) and pour the water over the coffee grounds to let them steep for 4 minutes. Then you push the knob down, which filters delicious coffee into the water and leaves the grounds at the bottom of your pot. Then, voila! You've got about 3 cups of yummy coffee, depending on to what extent you water your cup down with cream and sugar.
If you're one of those people who just CAN'T WAIT for their coffee, you'd be better off getting a typical drip coffee maker. But if you love coffee, and want it to taste as good as it possibly can, you have to buy this press.

The Portable Henry Rollins
The Portable Henry Rollins
by Henry Rollins
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 17.52
43 used & new from CDN$ 5.35

3.0 out of 5 stars Slightly depressing., May 21 2003
Perhaps they should have renamed it "Henry Rollins: His Depressingest Hits".
It's good, but it seems like the stories all lack the depth of many of this other books. They just leave you depressed and angsty. I'd get one of his other books instead (or before) this one.

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