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Ancient Okinawan Martial Arts Volume 2
Ancient Okinawan Martial Arts Volume 2
by Patrick McCarthy
Edition: Paperback
14 used & new from CDN$ 31.67

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ancient but Not Irrelevant, March 25 2002
Ancient Okinawan Martial Arts: Koryu Uchinadi; volume one, ISBN 0-8048-2093-7, and volume two, work well separately but best when taken together. I will review volume two here separately from volume one so that one might make a better decision when it comes to purchasing.
For both the novice and advanced Karate-ka this volume will prove to be an indispensable reference. It contains a brief outline of Karate-do master Kenwa Mabuni's life, details on the influence of Southern Chinese fighting systems (particularly White Crane and Monk Fist styles and their use of Qin Na), and the process which led to the transformation of Karate into a system of Bodo. Of special note in reference to this is the minutes of a meeting featuring Karate-do notables which is reproduced in this volume.
For those practicing Goju-ryu Karate-do take special note of this volume for the text "An Outline of Karate-do" by O'Sensei Chojun Miyagi is contained in full in this volume. Those practicing Kyokushinkai and Isshin-ryu will also find this text of interest. Those in Shotokan-ryu will be surprised to read of the controversy that arose between O'Sensei Funakoshi and controversial Choki Motobu.
If what you want is Okinawan Karate-do technique none surpasses The Essence of Okinawan Karate-do by Shoshin Nagamine, ISBN 0-8048-2110-0 which compliments volume one. If what you are interested in is more specifically the history of Okinawan Karate-do and Kobudo get this book along with Patrick McCarthy's Bubishi: the Bible of Karate, ISBN 0-8048-2015-5.

Ancient Okinawan Martial Arts Volume 1
Ancient Okinawan Martial Arts Volume 1
by Patrick McCarthy
Edition: Paperback
16 used & new from CDN$ 3.40

5.0 out of 5 stars Karate Weapons, March 25 2002
Ancient Okinawan Martial Arts: Koryu Uchinadi; volume one and volume two, ISBN 0-8048-3147-5, work well separately but best when taken together. I will review volume one here separately from volume two so that one might make a better decision when it comes to purchasing.
This volume deals with Kobudo (or the art of Karate weapons), widely considered an advanced topic in Karate-do. As such I would not recommend it to the novice Karate-ka. But I would definitely recommend it to those who wish to get a better grasp of Karate-do-- especially an Okinawan variety, to those looking to a different perspective on Kata, and to those studying Isshin-ryu Karate-do.
For those looking for a different perspective on Kata this volume is for you since it illustrates techniques solely through Kata. Six weapons Kata are described here which is not bad considering that most book an Karate rarely even describe one Kata. As for those studying Isshin-ryu Karate-do, you'll be interested in this book since it features a text written by O'Sensei Shimabuku's teacher Taira Shinken.
This book contains six Kata, as mentioned: three for the Bo and one for Sai, Tuifa (or Tonfa), and Nunchaku each as well as instructions on how to make a Bo. For those looking for an introduction to weapons this is an excellent book. If what you want is Okinawan Karate-do technique none surpasses The Essence of Okinawan Karate-do by Shoshin Nagamine, ISBN 0-8048-2110-0 which compliments this book. If what you are interested in is more specifically the history of Okinawan Karate-do and Kobudo get volume two along with Patrick McCarthy's Bubishi: the Bible of Karate, ISBN 0-8048-2015-5.

The Essence of Okinawan Karate-Do
The Essence of Okinawan Karate-Do
by Shoshin Nagamine
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 17.52
39 used & new from CDN$ 9.49

5.0 out of 5 stars The True Essence, March 25 2002
The Essence of Okinawan Karate-do by Shoshin Nagamine is, in my estimation, the best book on Karate-do for the price. It lays out for the reader the philosophy and technique of Matsubayashi-ryu. If you are a beginner this is a good book to learn form. If you are already a practitioner of Karate-do then this book will serve as a good reference, particularly in terms of Kata for 19 are given here.
This book begins with a history of Karate-do and the changes made to it with its introduction into Japan. Isshin-ryu practitioners will be interested in the histories of two of O'Sensei Shimabuku's teachers: Chotoku Kyan and Choki Motobu. Of interest to the practitioners of both Shotokan-ryu and Isshin-ryu will be the explanation of Okinawan techniques. For those that go from Shotokan-ryu to Isshin-ryu will find it helpful in the subtlety with which the stances are executed will make obvious the "how and why" in the higher stances in Isshin-ryu. Practitioners from both schools will find the section on Kata of interest in that four of the eight Isshin-ryu Kata are here in a varied form and 13 Shotokan Kata are here also in a varied form. The last chapter of the the book outlines the art of Kobujutsu which will be familiar to those in Isshin-ryu but rather new to Shotokan practitioners.
If one is an avid Karate-ka and is looking for a historical and thorough grounding in their art I would strongly recommend this book along with Patrick McCarthy's translation of the Bubishi: the Bible of Karate, ISBN 0-8048-2015-5.

Bible Of Karate Bubishi
Bible Of Karate Bubishi
by Editors Periplus
Edition: Paperback
17 used & new from CDN$ 17.84

5.0 out of 5 stars True Chapter and Verse, March 25 2002
Bible of Karate: Bubishi translated by Patrick McCarthy is an indispensable volume for the avid Karate-ka. A novice to Karate-do might do well to put off getting this volume until a more stable grounding in the art in attained. Otherwise, I say get it.
It contains no detailed explanation of technique but the section on the history and philosophy alone would make buying this book more than worth it's price. Those practicing Goju-ryu, Isshin-ryu, or Kyokushinkai varieties of Karate-do will find the origins of Kata, such as Sanchin and Seisan, given here most interesting. If technique is what you're looking for then get The Essence of Okinawan Karate-do by Shoshin Nagamine, ISBN 0-8048-2110-0, along with this book and you won't go wrong.
The Bible of Karate: Bubishi contains the descriptions of Chinese medicine, vital point striking, and strategy that informed the techniques of the Okinawan Masters. In and of themselves these explanations are inadequate introductions to these subjects. But that together as a book, that it became a volume treasured by the Okinawan Masters is of immense importance in that it give us helpful clues to the subjects these Karate-ka concerned themselves with and which they felt to be of vital importance to the advancement of their technique.
If what you are interested in is more specifically the history of Okinawan Karate-do and Kobudo get this book along with Patrick McCarthy's two volume Ancient Okinawan Martial Arts: Koryu Uchinadi; ISBN 0-8048-2093-7 volume one, ISBN 0-8048-3147-5 volume two.

Karate School
Karate School
by Mas Oyama
Edition: Paperback
15 used & new from CDN$ 17.81

5.0 out of 5 stars Get Schooled, March 19 2002
This review is from: Karate School (Paperback)
Karate School by Masutatsu "Mas" Oyama (previously published as Mas Oyama's Complete Karate Course) is an excellent introduction to Karate. Like Hidetaka Nishiyama and Richard C. Brown's Karate: the Art of "Empty Hand" Fighting, ISBN 0-8048-1668-9, it gives the reader clear and well illustrated instruction on the execution of fundamental techniques. Also like Nishiyama and Brown's book it includes entire sections are devoted to Kumite and the application of Karate in everyday situations. But unlike Nishiyama and Brown's book which, at least, has rather thin expositions of Karate history and philosophy, Oyama simply leaves them out altogether. In place of these what we are treated to are a detailed section on breathing techniques, an entire chapter on Tameshiwari, and Oyama's suggestions for modernizing Karate competition and its scoring system.
I would, of course, recommend this book for its thoroughness in detailing the fundamentals, its section on breathing techniques, and for what really distinguishes this book from Nishiyama and Brown's book, its chapter on Kata. While this chapter is not as heavy on the significance and importance of Kata it does give step-by-step explanations for five Kata. As with Nishiyama and Brown's book I would recommend supplementing this book with one that explains the historical and philosophical underpinnings of the art such as Robin L. Rielly's Complete Shotokan Karate, ISBN 0-8048-2108-9.

Karate School
Karate School
by Mas Oyama
Edition: Paperback
15 used & new from CDN$ 17.81

5.0 out of 5 stars Get Schooled, March 19 2002
This review is from: Karate School (Paperback)
Karate School by Masutatsu "Mas" Oyama (previously published as Mas Oyama's Complete Karate Course) is an excellent introduction to Karate. Like Hidetaka Nishiyama and Richard C. Brown's Karate: the Art of "Empty Hand" Fighting, ISBN 0-8048-1668-9, it gives the reader clear and well illustrated instruction on the execution of fundamental techniques. Also like Nishiyama and Brown's book it includes entire sections to Kumite and the application of Karate in everyday situations. But unlike Nishiyama and Brown's book which, at least, has rather thin expositions of Karate history and philosophy, Oyama simply leaves them out altogether. In place of these what we are treated to are a detailed section on breathing techniques, an entire chapter on Tameshiwari, and Oyama's suggestions for modernizing Karate competition and its scoring system.
I would, of course, recommend this book for its thoroughness in detailing the fundamentals, its section on breathing techniques, and for what really distinguishes this book from Nishiyama and Brown's book, its chapter on Kata. While this chapter is not as heavy on the significance and importance of Kata it does give step-by-step explanations for five Kata. As with Nishiyama and Brown's book I would recommend supplementing this book with one that explains the historical and philosophical underpinnings of the art such as Robin L. Rielly's Complete Shotokan Karate, ISBN 0-8048-2108-9.

Karate the Art of "Empty-Hand" Fighting
Karate the Art of "Empty-Hand" Fighting
by Hidetaka Nishiyama
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 22.36
36 used & new from CDN$ 16.16

4.0 out of 5 stars Fundamental Shotokan Karate, March 16 2002
Karate: the Art of "Empty Hand" Fighting by Hidetaka Nishiyama and Richard C. Brown is the perfect starter book for any one wishing to learn Shotokan Karate. It describes all the stances, punches, strikes, blocks, and kicks. An explanation of the application of Karate techniques in self-defense situations is given. Briefly outlined is the history and principles of the art but what is indispensable in the book are the recommended schedules for the different training situations which make this book a perfect guide for the student and helpful manual for the instructor. After learning what is in this book I would suggest moving on to one of the books by Robin L. Rielly; either Complete Shotokan Karate, ISBN 0-8048-2108-9, or The Secrets of Shotokan Karate, ISBN 0-8048-3229-3. My only wish is that the chapters on Kumite and Kata would be expanded but that is why I recommend the two books above as well.

Secrets of Shotokan Karate
Secrets of Shotokan Karate
by Robin L. Rielly
Edition: Paperback
19 used & new from CDN$ 2.54

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shotokan Revealed, March 16 2002
The Secrets of Shotokan Karate by Robin L. Rielly Is a must have for those who want to get the most out Shotokan-ryu. Together with mister Rielly's Complete Shotokan Karate, ISBN 0-8048-2108-9, no more thorough grounding in Shotokan-ryu can be had. But if what you are looking for is a book for the beginner to learn the fundamentals I would suggest getting Hidetaka Nishiyama and Richard C. Brown's Karate: the Art of "Empty Hand" Fighting, ISBN 0-8048-1668-9.
The Secrets of Shotokan Karate details the methods for generating balance, stability, force, and speed. Explained are the principles of distancing, timing, hip and stance shifting, and strategy. Of special interest is the section on hip shifting for it is one of the more subtle connections Karate has with the Chinese arts of Taijiquan and Kung Fu. Separate chapters are devoted to Kumite and Kata. The chapter on Kumite includes helpful drills for mastering this aspect of the art. The chapter on Kata is especially enlightening in explaining what is meant by the "hidden meaning of Kata". Included in the Kata chapter is a detailed step-by-step explanation of Kanku Dai and its applications.
This book takes the Karate-ka from a mere practitioners of an exercise to the mastery of the techniques and principles required for the making of a martial artist.

Complete Shotokan Karate: History, Philosophy, and Practice
Complete Shotokan Karate: History, Philosophy, and Practice
by Robert Rielly
Edition: Paperback
21 used & new from CDN$ 3.73

5.0 out of 5 stars Complete is Right, March 16 2002
Complete Shotokan Karate by Robin L. Rielly is the most complete reference for the Shotokan practitioner and a must have for the Karate-ka in general. In fact, this volume is two texts in one. But if what you are looking for is a book for the beginner to learn the fundamentals I would suggest getting Hidetaka Nishiyama and Richard C. Brown's Karate: the Art of "Empty Hand" Fighting, ISBN 0-8048-1668-9.
The first part is indispensable for the Karate-ka. It gives a very detailed (that is to the extent possible) history of Karate-do, including its possible origins in India and Greece, as well as its arrival in Japan and introduction into the US. It then supplements this information with genealogical trees for the development of the four major styles of Karate-do (Shotokan-ryu, Goju-ryu, Wado-ryu, and Shinto-ryu). It also outlines the origins of Isshin-ryu, Kyokushinkai, and Kobayashi-ryu. It then describes the feudal legacy of the Samurai and its influence on Karate-do. Many Karate-do maxims are analysis in this light giving the Karate-ka a more solid grounding in the philosophical aspects of the art.
In the second part of the book whole sections are devoted to the thorough explanation of etiquette, Kumite, and Kata. This is the part of the book that is geared soley to the Shotokan practitioner. I found the section on Kata to be the most indispensable. It lists the names and origins of the most popular of Shotokan kata dividing those that originated in the Shorin-ryu from those that originate in the Shorei-ryu traditions. But my fondness foe this section (and this book as a whole) springs from the complete and thoroughly illustrated step-by-step explanations of nine Shotokan Kata. Included are Tekki Shodan, Bassai Dai, Nijushiho, and Sochin.
Topping of the book is an appendix describing the belts and ranking system and what judges look for in applicants for rank promotion. I recommend it for all Karate-ka regardless of style.

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