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Reviews Written by
Tanja L. Walker "Tanja L. Walker" (Norman, OK USA)
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Night Divides The Day: The Music of the Doors
Night Divides The Day: The Music of the Doors
Offered by thebookcommunity_ca
Price: CDN$ 47.18
2 used & new from CDN$ 28.69

5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome mix of genres; this really worked!, Feb. 11 2003
I love George Winston, and I love the Doors. So when I saw that George Winston had done the music of the Doors on solo piano, I had to buy the CD. I bought it 10 days ago, and it has been playing in my Durango's CD player ever since. It is that incredible. The music is recognizably the Doors, yet Winston puts his own mark on it, from the jazzy style of "People are Strange," to the haunting and beautiful "The Crystal Ship." It's certainly not elevator music; this is piano music that demands to not just be heard, but really listened to, just as the original Doors music did over 30 years ago, but in an entirely new way. Don't pass this one up!

What Should I Do with My Life?: The True Story of People Who Answered the Ultimate Question
What Should I Do with My Life?: The True Story of People Who Answered the Ultimate Question
by Po Bronson
Edition: Hardcover
67 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars Insightful stories helped me, Feb. 7 2003
A friend sent me this book, knowing that I, like many of the people Po interviewed, am asking that "What should I do with my life?" question. Some of the people, he talked to, admittedly, were kind of whiny, like the woman who dropped out of medical school because she discovered she would have to--gasp!--work with sick people. On the other hand, I found many of the stories inspiring and helpful, and they guided me back toward two of the career goals I had wanted to pursue in the first place--writing and the ministry. Now I'm taking more decisive steps in both those directions. Po worries in his book that he might be interfering in some of his interviewees' lives, but isn't that the whole point of the book? This isn't objective journalism, and he shouldn't try to make it such. I think he did a fine job, and he certainly helped me. Thanks, Po.

Where Is God When It Hurts Red Cross Spec Ed.
Where Is God When It Hurts Red Cross Spec Ed.
by Philip Yancey
Edition: Paperback
49 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Didn't answer "Why," but still helpful, Feb. 7 2003
What frustrated me was that Philip Yancy didn't even even try to answer the question "Why does God allow suffering?" Maybe there is no answer that we can discern, but we can try. At least he helps us find meaning in our suffering, which is definitely a step in the right direction. He also explains the value of physical pain--he probably could have extended the analogy to psychological pain; if we didn't feel psychological pain, we would just go about doing whatever we felt like to other people without thought of the consequences.

I also appreciated the detail Mr. Yancy went into to discuss how people can approach those in pain, realizing there is no one right way, but there are certainly wrong ways! God does not send us pain because we are "bad," or to send judgement on us! I would definitely recommend this book for someone in pain, particularly physical pain, such as cancer or a chronic illness, as well as to their loved ones.

Stages Of Faith
Stages Of Faith
by James Fowler
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 15.16
44 used & new from CDN$ 4.87

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Slow start, but interesting look at faith development, Jan. 28 2003
This review is from: Stages Of Faith (Paperback)
I have to admit, I found the first part of this book to be rather dull reading, and if I wasn't reading this for research on a book I'm co-writing with a friend, I might have given up! But I stuck it out, and I'm glad I did. Fowler is clever in giving a mock symposium to introduce the development theories of Erickson, Piaget, and Kohlberg. And once he actually gets into his stages of faith development, the book really gets interesting. He provides interesting examples of people at different stages of faith development, and importantly, he does not judge people at the different stages--it would be easy to assume people are "better," or "more faithful" at higher stages. This book helped me understand where I am in my faith development, and helped me see ways I can grow in my own faith. This is not, however, a casual read. It takes quite a bit of concentration, and at times, I found Fowler a little hard to follow, especially at the beginning and the end. Still, I recommend it for anyone who wants to understand their faith journey, whatever faith journey they may be on.

No Man Is an Island
No Man Is an Island
by Thomas Merton
Edition: Paperback
39 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Difficult but deep, Jan. 24 2003
This review is from: No Man Is an Island (Paperback)
I guess I have been spoiled by more modern writers, who seem to be simpler to read than Thomas Merton was. Still, I got a lot out of this book, especially his essays on suffering, charity, sincerity. mercy and solitude. He had many good quotes along the way that led me to some good introspection -- not mere bumper sticker theology. This is a book that needs to be read slowly, with a journal to record the thoughts that come along as you read it -- something I unfortunately did not do, and I regret that. I will probably have to read this book again when I have more quiet time to really absorb its meaning.

I Am Sam - Music From and Inspired By the
I Am Sam - Music From and Inspired By the
Price: CDN$ 12.07
40 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars What a great collection of Beatles covers, Jan. 20 2003
When I first heard this collection of Beatles covers, I had to get this album for myself. I am so glad I did. All of these songs, from "Two of Us" to "Revolution" to "Let it Be" are both faithful to the original Beatles, yet have a modern twist all their own, carrying a stamp of the artists who recorded them for this album. I have listened to it over and over again and have not gotten tired of it. Now, I just need to see the movie . . .

The Lake of Dead Languages
The Lake of Dead Languages
by Carol Goodman
Edition: Hardcover
39 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars Engrossing tale, well written, Jan. 15 2003
I really enjoyed this deeply crafted and well-written debut novel by Carol Goodman. She serves up a plethora of plot twists and really delves into the many jealousies, rituals, and secrets of private school life. It is interesting too, and believable, how history repeats itself in each generation. Unlike some other reviewers, I did not find the ending silly, though perhaps it was a tad bit contrived. Like other readers, I did guess the identity and motive of the person behind the persecution of Jane fairly early on (though I did get thrown a curve ball about 2/3 of the way through), but that did not detract me from reading the story, as there were so many other secrets to be revealed, some of which were total surprises. This is a great novel for cold winter evenings by the fire with a warm blanket and a hot cup of tea.

Gift For All People
Gift For All People
by Max Lucado
Edition: Hardcover
62 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars A nice, inspirational read, Jan. 13 2003
This review is from: Gift For All People (Hardcover)
I bought this as a gift for myself, and this is my first introduction to the adult works of Max Lucado. (I have several of his children's books, and my children and I have thoroughly enjoyed them.) Overall, I found the little essays in this book well-written and inspirational. I would tell myself I would just read "one or two" as a nightly devotional, and end up reading five or six! His descriptions of God's grace and love for us are beyond compare. I did, however, find his descriptions of Christ's death on the cross almost too gleefully lurid. I appreciate the need to explain just how much Christ sacrificed for us, but I wonder if perhaps Mr. Lucado goes into too much detail? I definitely would not recommend this book for someone under 16 for that reason. Still, this is a great, inspirational book and a great introduction to Lucado's work.

The Boy Next Door: A Novel
The Boy Next Door: A Novel
by Meg Cabot
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 13.36
74 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars I loved this book!, Jan. 10 2003
"The Boy Next Door" was absolutely one of the funniest, cutest books I've read in quite some time! I really enjoyed the format of having the book entirely written through emails, and unlike some other reviewers, I found I got to know the characters quite well by how they wrote and responded to their emails. The interplay between Mel and John, between Mel and her co-workers, and the various family members, all were priceless! They were all larger than life, without being over-the-top. Nadine was the perfect best friend, and I loved that she was a size 16! All the pieces and subplots fit well together, and even when I could see how certain things would end up, I still enjoyed watching the pieces come together. This was a light, fun read, and very, very enjoyable. I caan't wait to see what else Meggin Cabot comes up with next!

Islam Unveiled: Disturbing Que
Islam Unveiled: Disturbing Que
by Robert Spencer
Edition: Hardcover
31 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars A sobering look at Islamic fundamentalism, Jan. 1 2003
After reading "Islam Unveiled," I have little doubt that Islamic fundamentalism is indeed a threat, both to those marginalized within the system (e.g. women), and those who live outside the system within Islamic countries. Spencer coherently points out the many ways in which the Koran is used to justify ill treatment of women and of those who are not Muslim. He also explains how Muslims took over Christian lands 400 years before the Crusades -- which, of course does not justify the Crusades, but does put the Crusades in a new context.

That said, I had to question why he thinks only MUSLIM fundamentalists are dangerous. He holds up Christianity as a pillar of light in the founding of Western secularism (making me wonder if Spencer is perhaps European). The problem is not in the Muslim faith itself, but in the literal reading so many Muslims give it. The same is true in Christianity--why is he so quick to gloss over the fact that for so many years, Southern Christians used the Bible to condone and endorse slavery? What about the fundamentalist churches, and the Catholics, that use a literal reading of the Bible to keep women who have God-given talents to preach and teach from doing so, and in some cases keep them subservient in their homes? What about the laws, inspired by a literal, non-contextual reading, of the Bible, that actively discriminates against 10 percent of our population, that is gays and lesbians? Certainly things are much better here than in Muslim countries, but we suffer here, too, from the abuses of fundamentalism. And unlike Spencer, I believe that as more Muslims are exposed to Western thought, they will begin to read the Koran in a more liberal, contextual light, as many Christians and Jews have learned to read their scriptures.

In short, I think the threat Spencer spells out is real, but while it is strongest from Muslim fundamentalists, it is not only from the Muslim fundamentalists. I recommend reading "The Battle for God" for a further discussion of fundamentalism in all three monotheistic faiths (though that doesn't really get into the threats of fundamentalism in general, either).

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